A Sense of Adventure: World Records

This week’s theme:

A Sense of Adventure: World Records

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week:

Since 1955 record-breaking achievements have been noted by Guinness World Records; they list world records both of human achievements and the extremes of the natural world.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

Look at the Guinness World Records website  – explore what the site/book is for, and what extraordinary or unusual records can you find.

The longest fingernails record always fascinated me. Measure your own finger nails with a ruler or tape measure to imagine just *how long* the record holder’s must be! The longest ever fingernails are… Little finger : 179.1 cm; Ring finger : 181.6 cm; Middle finger : 186.6 cm; Index finger : 164.5 cm; Thumb : 197.8 cm.

You can make a record out of practically anything – check out this amazing human mattress dominoes!! How much fun does that look!

 

Activity 2

Try setting your own purple records… bring your stop clocks, tape measures and make fancy score boards to record your record breakers!

How quickly can you say these tongue twisters correctly? How many times can you say them before you slip up?

This man holds the record for reciting Shakespeare the fastest. Pick a short phrase/lyrics to try saying quickly.

How quickly (and slowly) can you do this movement routine: raise your arms, wave, clap, pat your head, raise your arms, wave clap, pat your head. Try and break your own record!

Try setting a purple balancing record… What’s the *longest* time you can balance a book on your head for while properly dancing to Queen? Then, *how many* books can you balance on our head while doing this?

Try setting a Purple speed record… How fast can you dress up in the colours of the rainbow?

This boy holds the record for the fastest clapping – can you rival him? (Try using the settings ‘cog’ on YouTube to slow the video down to 0.25 to watch him in slow-motion)

What records can you come up with yourself to try out?

 

Activity 3

In her era, Viola Smith was known as ‘The Fastest Girl Drummer’. Watch her drumming here).

Try setting some fast (air, or pen) drumming records – think the Star Wars warm-up drumming x loads (see 4:53 minutes into the video here)!!

You could also try breaking some conducting records after watching the video. With your batons, try conducting yourself to make the highest sounds you can, and the lowest notes ever heard!

 

Activity 4

Draw round your feet – colour and decorate. Now measure heel to toe, how long your foot is. The World record for largest feet on a living person is held by Jeison Orlando Rodriguez Hernández, a 22 year old man from Venezuela; his right foot measures 40.55cm and his left foot measures 40.47cm. He needs specially-made large shoes that are made just for him. How much larger than your feet are Jeison’s feet?

 

Activity 5

How many (single) socks you put on one foot in 30 seconds? Challenge people you live with to try it out too!

Create and decorate a score board to write down your results.

 

Activity 6

Watch this video of Richard Fink holding longest vocal note ever (2 minutes 1 second). How long can you do this for/ make the same continuous sound for?

 

Activity 7

Watch this video of the most robots dancing simultaneously. Put on some robotic music and see if you can copy some of the robot’s moves to this music.

 

Activity 8

There used to be a Record Breakers TV show (listen to the theme tune, ‘Dedication’ from 1:05 here). Play imaginary instruments in time with the song.

What does the word ‘Dedication’ mean? Are there any of today’s challenges that you want to practice or try again and try to do better at?

Are there any things in your life that you want to commit more to, and dedicate to being better at? You don’t have to break records, you could just practice a bit more and impress yourself. It could be doing more of your own cooking, making art every day, doing more exercise, finishing that computer game, learning the alphabet, designing your own colouring page. Challenge yourself!

 

Activity 9

Create and decorate a Purple World Records certificate to give to yourself for completing any of any of the above challenges.

 

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventurous People: Paralympians

This week’s theme:

Adventurous People – Paralympians

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week:

The first Summer Paralympic Games was held in Italy in 1960. The first Winter Paralympic Games was held in Sweden in 1976.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

Look at some famous GB Paralympians. Do you recognise them, and can you do some actions for the para sports they’re famous for competing in?

Ellie Simmonds – Swimming

David Weir – Wheelchair Athletics

Hannah Cockcroft – 100m / 800m wheelchair racer

Hollie Arnold – Javelin

Jonnie Peacock – 100m sprinter

Kadeena Cox – Runner / Athlete

Sarah Storey – Cyclist and Swimmer

Vanessa Wallace – Shot Put

Tanni Grey-Thompson – Wheelchair racer

Kelly Gallagher – Visually impaired Alpine Skiier

Lee Pearson – Para-equestrianism/ Dressage

 

Activity 2

Do some actions and movements for some other Summer para sports: para-archery, rowing, power lifting, table tennis, etc. What stretches might you have to do to prepare for playing these sports? What might you have to eat to be fit enough to play these sports?

What other sports are in the Paralympics (Summer) and (Winter)? Which sports are in the Special Olympics? What do you know about these sports – have you ever tried any of them?

 

Activity 3

Every 4 years the Paralympics start with a wonderful Opening Ceremony to welcome to Olympic flame and kick-start the Games. This ceremony is full of dance, music, lighting, props, costumes and song.

Lucy (a friend of Purple Patch) was part of the team who choreographed the Opening Ceremony of the Paralympic Games in London in 2012 (see any of the first 20 minutes here)

Watch Lucy’s video below, sent especially to Purple Patch – Can you follow any of her choreography, and take up her challenge to design your own moves?

Why not take a photo of any of your moves and we’ll show them to Lucy? You can send images to melanie@purplepatcharts.org

 

Activity 4

MATP (Motor Activity Training Program) is non-competitive training run by Special Olympics GB to improve and develop basic motor skills needed before becoming an athlete.

Try a purple version:

  1. Warm-Up Activities – Try some gentle stretches; from the top of your head, move you’re your body wiggling everything in turn until you reach your toes.
  2. Create some Skill Stations with activities that develop skills of Mobility, Dexterity, Striking, and Kicking.

Station 1 Dexterity: Try rolling a small pea shaped paper ball, an egg sized paper ball, and a larger paper ball. How many times can you pick up and throw each up into the air and catch in a row?

Station 2 Mobility: Dash around to collect bright coloured objects that spell out ‘Sport’. Or, collect objects the colours of the Olympic rings (black, yellow, red, green, blue).

Station 3 Striking and Kicking: Listen to these songs Kung Fu Fighting – Carl Douglas, Salt and Pepa – Push It, Get your kicks on Route 66 – Chuck Berry, and use your arms of legs to act out the ‘push/kick’ lyrics. Also, listen to these songs with excellent drumming opportunities. Use your arms or legs (or both) to hit the floor, tabletop, etc in time with the drums to In the Air Tonight – Phil Collins, 7 Nation Army – White Stripes, Superstition – Stevie Wonder, We Will Rock You – Queen, or Less Than Jake.

  1. Conclusion – Try some relaxation activities to cool down – try listening to this calming music and concentrate on your slow, steady breathing. Or, try some relaxing Tai Chi moves such as these.

 

Activity 5

The logo for 2022 Special Olympics World Winter Games is ‘Zilant’ the dragon. The dragon hugs the whole logo which is emblematic of friendship, hospitality, and joy. The dragon encircles the logo as he protects and welcomes all participants and guests of the Games.

Try drawing your own hugging, protective dragon.

Or, take a look at the Paralympic mascots from over the years and design your own!

 

Activity 6

Some people at the Para Olympics hold, use, and succeed with their equipment in different ways to each other.

Sometimes table tennis bats are held in the mouth (see Egypt’s Ibrahim Hamadtou)

Sometimes archery is done without arms (see the USA’s Matt Stutzman)

Sometimes skiing is done with a guide to follow (see Northern Ireland’s Kelly Gallagher with her guide Charlotte Evans)

Sometimes balls are heard and not seen (see Goalball)

Try doing things in different ways, to experience how other people might do things differently to you. Try writing or drawing with your opposing hand. Rather than seeing if a person is close or far away, try listening to hear the sounds they make to work out their distance from you. Be guided to complete an activity by following somebody else who wants you to succeed.

 

Activity 7

Design gold, silver, and bronze medals for these specific Paralympic sports:

Boccia, Goalball, Wheelchair Basketball, Ice Sledge Hockey, Wheelchair Fencing, Wheelchair Rugby, Wheelchair Tennis, Wheelchair curling.

 

Activity 8

Try some of the Mencap and Special Olympics GB virtual challenges (movement, throwing, hitting, kicking). See the challenge cards here or see here for some videos.

Keep score on your own scoreboard!

 

Activity 9

Have a dance to some of these Paralympics/Olympics positive and uplifting songs.

Yes I Can

I am what I am (from 2012 ceremony)

Elbow – A Day Like This

When the going gets tough

Proud – Heather Small

Public Enemy – Harder than you think

One moment in time – Whitney Houston

Bang the Drum – Nelly Furtado and Bryan Adams

Coldplay & British Paraorchestra

 

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

A Spring Adventure

This week’s theme:

A Spring Adventure

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week:

This year, the start of Spring is on 20th March 2021.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

William Blake wrote ‘Songs of Innocence’ in 1789; several of the poems from this collection were written to welcome the Spring.

Read the poem Spring by William Blake or ask someone to read it out to you. Can you make some actions and sounds to go with the different lines?

The poem mentions ‘bird’s delight’, ‘nightingales’, ‘larks’ and a ‘cock crowing’. Open a window, or an outside door and quietly listen to the birds that you can hear. Count how many different birds you hear. Can you identify any of the birdsong, try watching this video.

The poem mentions ‘Little Lamb Here I am’; practice calling out to let people know where you are – try Baaing and Bleating like the sheep heard here.

In the poem, the author can feel the soft wool of the sheep – what’s the softest thing you can find? Can you find anything made of wool?

 

Activity 2

Read the Spring poem ‘Ecchoing Green’ by William Blake or ask someone to read it out to you. Can you make some actions and sounds to go with the different words in bold?

The poem says ‘The sun does arise, And make happy the skies’; create your own ‘Sunrise’ artwork in the ‘pop art’ style of Roy Lichtenstein, using dots and bright colours, and cotton wool for clouds. Or, print out a version to colour in here.

The poem says ‘The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring’ – make some bell sounds of your own by tinkling a felt tip pen inside the sides of a mug – create a bell orchestra with different sized cups making different pitches! Or, listen to ‘Ring My Bell’, have a dance and ding metal cutlery together in time with the song.

Both poems mention the birds of Spring. Watch live video streams of birds feeding here, here, and here. Watch a live stream of goats, lambs and sheep here. Can you move like any of the creatures you’ve seen?

 

Activity 3

Daffodils announce the beginning of the spring and the waking of nature.

Read Wordsworth’s poem about Daffodils. In the poem he describes that Daffodils move by ‘Fluttering and dancing in the breeze’ and ‘Tossing their heads in sprightly dance’ and ‘They stretched in never-ending line’. Dance like a daffodil to this very yellow song while fluttering your arms, tossing your head, and stretching your limbs as far as you can.

 

Activity 4

Seeing spring flowers blooming is often one of the first signs of spring – from snowdrops  to daffodils, tulips to crocus.  Act out the journey of blooming – from a cold and freezing winter, to the weather getting warmer meaning you can break through the soil, start growing your leaves, your stalk will reach higher to the sun, you will flower and bloom and dance your petals around!

Draw different shaped flowers and petal and make a springtime flower show.

 

Activity 5

Try some Spring yoga moves such as flower pose, tree pose,  or butterfly pose. If these are tricky, try some simple chair yoga and when you stretch your arms imagine you’re growing and blooming like a flower. Try stretching whilst enjoying this seasonal song.

 

Activity 6

A field full of thousands of Daffodils looks so beautiful, like a huge blanket of yellow, see here. Find as many yellow items as you can in your house to make a table top ‘daffodil field’.

 

Activity 7

Hanami is the Japanese tradition of celebrating blossom as the first sign of spring.

In Japan as the trees become alive with the color of cherry blossom (which they call ‘Sakura’) the local people all head to their closest park with food and drinks such as tea, they find a perfect spot for sitting down and enjoy a long picnic under the blossom trees. This is called ‘hanami’. Strawberries are the seasonal spring fruit in Japan, making them a popular hanami dessert. Other fruits like oranges and kiwi fruit are also popular in Japan. Once the sun goes down everybody is in for a cherry blossom viewing treat as Sakura are often illuminated with hanging lanterns.

Put down a blanket in your house or garden and have a picnic for your lunch! Draw strawberries, oranges or kiwi! Watch this video all about Hanami! At 2:30 practice pronouncing the Japanese words for ‘cherry blossom, full bloom, cherry blossom viewing, spring, pink, park, picnic, and flower. Try making this lantern too!

Blossom has been nicknamed ‘Natures confetti’ – cut out paper petal shapes to throw into the air like confetti. See how many you can catch in a hat, bowl or net. Repeat until you’re a pro catcher! You could also try making some blossom art work using objects found in your recycling, like this!

 

Activity 8

Across the world spring is seen as a time for new beginnings, happiness and growth. Many countries have their own unique spring traditions and celebrations.

An egg dance is a traditional Easter game in which eggs are laid on the ground and the goal is to dance among them damaging as few as possible. Try this game, but instead of eggs, try dancing to this whilst not stepping on rolled up paired socks scattered on the floor.

 

Activity 9

Cimburijada, which translates to “Festival of Scrambled Eggs,” celebrates the first day of spring in the Bosnian town of Zenica. At the crack of dawn, people gather by the banks of the Bosna river, where a communal meal of scrambled eggs is prepared. Try eating scrambled eggs for lunch, or thinking about your favourite way to cook eggs, or your favourite recipes with eggs in – draw these out!

Decorate some paper or cardboard egg shapes (or print out eggs for colouring in here), cut them out and then cut the egg shapes into large solid pieces. ‘Scramble’ the pieces up into a jigsaw for you to solve! The more eggs you work on at once, the trickier it will be to solve the puzzle!

 

Activity 10

In Mexico, people gather at the enormous Teotihuacán Pyramid to celebrate the spring equinox. People use the morning to climb the 360 steps to the top of the Pyramid. By raising their arms towards the sky and basking in the sun’s warmth, they “soak up” energy for the year. Try counting your footsteps as you dance to your favourite music, can you get anything close to 360 footsteps? Try move number 1 and 2 of the Sun Salutation yoga poses or try the seated Sun Salutations here. You could do them to this relaxing Mexican music.

 

Activity 11

Ladybirds start to appear in Spring.

Make your own paper ladybirds like these here or twirling ladybirds like these here.

Try some of the forward and backwards ‘Little Lady Bug’ line dancing steps. Or, come up with your own Ladybird inspired dance moves along with the country music.

  

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures in Poetry & Rhymes

This week’s theme:

Adventures in Poetry & Rhymes

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week:

A limerick is a five-line verse where the first, second and fifth line rhyme, while the third and fourth lines share a different rhyme.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

Learn some amazing limericks & follow the actions in these videos by Lisa –

Paul the Dog

Nelly the Cat

Jonah the Fish

Murray the Beetle

Fred the Dragon

Can you come up with any of your own where the first, second and fifth line rhyme, while the third and fourth lines share a different rhyme

 

Activity 2

Writer Michael Rosen set an online poetry challenge that we can do too.

Think of a character in the plot of a film, book, TV show. Write a poem as if you were that character in that film/book/TV show. In the poem, write about what you’re thinking, seeing, hearing, experiencing.

For example, could you write a poem as if you were Captain Jack Sparrow on the galleon in Pirates of the Caribbean? Or as if you were Harry Potter on your first day at Hogwarts? Or as if you were Roy Cropper working a shift at Roy’s Rolls on Coronation Street?

 

Activity 3

Read, or have somebody read to you the poem ‘The Jabberwocky’ by Lewis Carrol.

Act it out, come up with actions, practice saying the words or making noises such as ‘snicker-snack’. Try making up some of your own nonsense words.

Draw what you think ‘slithy toves’, a ‘Jubjub bird’, ‘The frumious Bandersnatch’, a ‘vorpal sword’, the ‘Tumtum tree’ and indeed ‘The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame’ might look like, sound like, feel like and smell like.

 

Activity 4

A lot of poems Rhyme. Rhyming is where words sound the same; like cat, mat, fat, drat, hat.

Take a look at, and hear the writer, Spike Milligan read ‘On The Ning Nang Nong’.

Which are the rhyming words? What other words could you make rhyme with ‘Ning’, ‘Nang’, or ‘Nong’? Replace your words into the poem and make up your own nonsense rhyming poem.

 

Can you think of a word that rhymes with purple? If not, make up some rhyming words like Spike Milligan would! Write your new words out and decorate them. Create a glossary of what your made-up words might actually mean. Say the words out loud – say them in different tones, with different emotion; might this affect what you think the words mean?

 

Come up with actions for the different things mentioned in another of Spike Milligan’s rhyming poems, ‘The Land of The Bumbly Boo’ that you can hear him read here. Draw some cats wearing trousers and hats, and anything else from the poem!

 

Activity 5

William Blake’s poem ‘The Tyger’ starts:

Tyger Tyger, burning bright,

In the forests of the night;

What immortal hand or eye,

Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

 

Come up with actions for these 4 lines.

The fiery/burning imagery used throughout the poem conjures the tiger’s aura of danger – Prowl like a tiger. Growl like an angry tiger. Practice rolling your r’s by saying (like Tony the Tiger) ‘They’re Grrrreat!

 

Can you move and prowl like a hunting tiger, and mime catching your meal with claws or jaws? Draw and design lots of your own food items; cut them out and see how many can you catch in your tiger claws or jaws if you throw them into the air.

 

Create an art work of a tiger’s face using symmetry to make both sides of the face, and their stripes, match.

 

Tangerine Dream made the poem’s words into a song. Can you make your own percussion or dance accompaniment to it?

 

Activity 6

Rhythm poetry describes poems that move to a beat.

Read aloud, or ask somebody to read to you ‘Humble Crumble’ by Ian McMillan.

Create body percussion (claps, taps, snaps) to the beats of the poem. Try saying the poem faster and slower but keep to the same beat – does the percussion rhythm change? Move your body to the rhythm of the poem recited quickly and slowly; create body shapes, patterns and movements in time to it.

 

Have a play with rhythm. Listen to different bpms on a Metronome app – can you keep to the rhythm and tap/clap/snap in time? Change the pace of the metronome (faster and slower) can you keep up with the metronome as it changes pace? Can you say the syllables of your name in time with the metronome at different paces?

 

Activity 7

At the beginning of Alice Walker’s poem, ‘A Picture Story For The Curious’ (a poem all about growing up and getting older), the writer states ‘you supply the pictures!’ Can you draw pictures or draw pictures with your body shapes to accompany any of the words in her poem?

 

Activity 8

Make a sound scape for the poem ‘The Sound Collector’ by Roger McGough. Can you create a sound for every line of the poem, and collect the sounds into a big bag like the robber who steals them all? Create a robber’s mask to wear as you act out creeping round to steal the sounds.

Try to create the silence heard at the end of the poem – time how long you can keep silent for.

 

Activity 9

Try some military-style chanting. Use your rhyming skills to fill in some of these blanks, while marching in time and saluting. Act as the sergeant major and to call everybody to ‘Attention!’

I don’t know, but I’ve been told

I don’t know, but I’ve been told

(3 syllable word) are mighty bold! (e.g. “News Readers”)

(3 syllable word) are mighty bold!

Sound off. One, two

Sound off. Three, four

Out of (3 syllable word) we grew (e.g. “Purple Patch”)

Out of (3 syllable word) we grew

We’re a rough and ready crew

We’re a rough and ready crew

Sound off. One, two

Sound off. Three, four

I don’t know, but I’ve been told

I don’t know, but I’ve been told

(3 syllable word) is good as gold (e.g. “Santa Claus”)

(3 syllable word) is good as gold

Sound off. One, two

Sound off. Three, four

(3 syllable word) is really grand (e.g. “Exercise”)

(3 syllable word) is really grand

Marching in the mud and sand

Marching in the mud and sand

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures at Purple Patch

 

For the next 3 weeks our Purple Patch Zoom sessions will be filled with fun accessible activities that will help us gather information that evaluates Purple Patch. This means all of our participants will be able to give their opinions and thoughts on what we do and how they feel about it. We’ve designed a host of fun accessible evaluation activities with support from Tom Bailey and Lloyds Bank Foundation which will be keeping us very busy.

While we’re busy carrying out this big evaluation project in our programmes we’ll be taking a 3 week break from posting our normal Purple Patch daily activities here on our website. In the meantime, check out some of these other wonderful activities below & we’ll be back on Monday 15th March!

 

Purple Colouring In:

Revisit our Colouring Pages. Are there any you’ve missed? Are there any you’d like to try again? There will be 3 special ones over the next 3 weeks linked to giving your own thoughts and opinions.

 

Purple Videos:

Check out these videos created by Purple Patch staff during the first lockdown in 2020.  You can try yoga and storytelling with Grace, movement with Chemaine, pen drumming with James, a theme tune quiz with Jessica, art with Lorna, Lola and Ailsa, drama games with Anna, and dance tutorials with Jess!

 

Art:

Mindful Art Online is a bi-weekly Zoom session that you can join from the comfort of your own home and peacefully draw along with Lorna and Lola. The sessions run on Mondays at 10am and 7pm on Thursdays. More information here.

The Art Doctors have created 15 wonderful (and at times very silly!) videos that you can join in with at home  – check out their Youtube Playlist filled with them!

Try a guided 5 Minute art Meditation with videos from The National Gallery.

 

Music:

Brush up on your Makaton, and try learning some new signs to some of your favourite songs, with Singing Hands.

Have fun with visual song making at the Chrome Music Lab.

Opera North have created 5 sound journeys to be listened to on headphones whilst walking.

 

Creative ideas & activities:

Learning Disability England have a list of things to get involved with online.

Mindwell have lots of creative resources and activities.

Mencap’s have written a guide on Ways to Keep Busy.

Arts and Minds have created a ‘Ways to Wellbeing’ resource packed with ideas to keep you busy and well.

 

Online activities:

The Leep1 Facebook group is the hub for Leep 1’s activities. Anyone with a learning disability can request to become a member of the group and access the classes and sessions they host via Zoom and Facebook Live. The group offers a safe and supportive place for members to stay connected and learn skills during the pandemic and so far it has been a huge success. More information about the Facebook Group and the online activities Leep 1 offer can be found here.

Love2meetU are offering lots of different online activities from quizzes to karaoke, relaxation to social clubs all for free until April. See their Facebook page for info on how to get involved.

 

Drama:

Dramatize theatre company have loads of great online Video Activities.

 

Sport/Movement:

Mencap’s Virtual Challenge week has passed, but you can still do the activities (movement, throwing, hitting and kicking) set by Mencap and Special Olympics GB.

Get moving! Try doing some exercise that gets your blood pumping a little bit, getting oxygen all around your body and to your brain. Try this workout to music, or there’s a 10 minute workout you could follow here. Or you could jog on the spot, or step up and down on your bottom couple of steps of your staircase.

Try dressing up for your workout, like in this superhero inspired workout! Kapow!

Try seated, lower intensity ‘Love To Move’ workouts here, here, and here.

If you’re feeling up to it, have a more strenuous Baked Beans workout here.

Try some stretching exercises here. Or chair Pilates here.

 

Singing:

Opera North are running ‘From Couch to Chorus: Sing into Spring’ a 4 week course for those who want to give singing a go.  Starting on Wednesday 24 February you’ll get to learn how to sing a harmonic line from the comfort of your own home, and on mute(!), get to sing along with pre-recorded videos of our very own Chorus of Opera North, and learn extracts from world-famous operas. From Couch to Chorus: Sing into Spring is a joyful and welcoming place for all, whether you already love to sing or have never uttered a note. Over 2000 people took part in the festive edition, and 90% said it improved their wellbeing! Here’s a special welcome video from the vocal coach on the course, Jenny.  More info here.

 

Also:

Check out activities linked by Through the Maze.

Adventures through time – The 1920s

This week’s theme:

Adventures through time – The 1920s

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week:

The ‘Roaring’ 1920s were one hundred years ago and life was different back then.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

The British Broadcasting Company (BBC) was founded in 1922 to provide a radio service across the nation.

Pretend to be a radio presenter: Everyone takes a turn in introducing one other person on Zoom. Try interviewing each other for a radio show – what questions could you ask to create good dialogue? Use whatever is available to act as a microphone…something circular would fit with the style at the time. Try to use an old fashioned, ‘posh’ clipped BBC voice; try doing some ‘How Now Brown Cow’ pronunciation to practice!

 

Activity 2

The Charleston was composed to accompany the Charleston dance. Try doing some of the movements, you could do the foot movements with your hands and arms too. Lots of fun arm movements here.

The Charleston is a fun, cheeky dance. Look at the upper body and facial expressions at 1:50 here. Can you recreate cheeky facial expressions?

The Great Gatsby was a book written by F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1925. The book featured socialites, flappers (women who flaunted their disdain for what was then considered acceptable behaviour), glamour, and the glitz of the 1920s era. Recreate the razzle dazzle of a 1920s party… Dress to the nines in some bling, pearl beads, or fringing and try out your new Charleston moves! Pour yourself a water cocktail, and party like a flapper to this or this music.

 

Activity 3

The famous and popular classical piece, ‘The Lark Ascending’ was composed by Ralph Vaughan Williams and was first performed in 1920/1921. The Lark Ascending was inspired by a poem of the same name written by George Meredith, which tells the tale of a skylark singing an impossibly beautiful, almost heavenly, song.

The composition is a ‘pastoral’ one – i.e. one about the British countryside – you can imagine the birds ascending through the sky. Soar your body, face, arms, and hands with the swell of the music. What animals can you visualise in the countryside – act out them appearing and moving in the scene, birds soaring in the sky.

What instruments can you hear – mime playing them.

The piece is contemplative slow music – what do you think about, feel, or see when you hear the music. Is classical music like this upsetting or relaxing? Listening to it has been described as the feeling of waking up on a beautiful new morning and rising out of bed – act out how that may feel.

Could you do a mindfulness activity with this music, such as mindful drawing?

Create some skylark art work like this or this or this or this.

 

Activity 4

‘Show Boat’ is a musical from the late 1920s, it follows the lives of the performers, stagehands and dock workers on the ‘Cotton Blossom’, a Mississippi River show boat.

Make a river boat by making the actions and sounds of the paddleboat wheels spinning, and the steam puttering. You could even try your best ‘Proud Mary’ dance actions and Roll of the River with Tina Turner!

Listen to one of the songs from the musical, – Ol’ Man River (this version is from the later film). Come up with actions for the lyrics:

There’s an old man called the Mississippi. That’s the old man I don’t like to be!

What does he care if the world’s got troubles? What does he care if the land ain’t free?

Old man river, That old man river

He must know sumpin’. But don’t say nuthin’,

He just keeps rollin’. He keeps on rollin’ along.

He don’t plant taters, He don’t plant cotton,

And them that plants ’em Is soon forgotten,

But old man river, He just keeps rollin’ along.

You and me, we sweat and strain, Body all achin’ and racked with pain,

Tote that barge! And lift that bale!

Get a little drunk And you lands in jail

But I keeps laughin’. Instead of cryin’

I must keep fightin’. Until I’m dyin’

And old man river, He just keeps rollin’ along

 

Activity 5

The films from this era were mostly silent movies, featuring actors such as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Mary Pickford, Clara Bow, & Laurel and Hardy.

Practice dressing up as, and walking like Charlie Chaplin.

The dialogue, or change of location/time in silent films that could not be communicated by actors was put on-screen via screen cards (see the “Open the Door” card (around 1:32) in this Chaplin scene). Create a series of screen cards and act out what happens after the written dialogue.

Since there was no talking, music was often used to show the drama (see this early silent film, to hear the music). Make music of your own to accompany dramatic scenes.

 

Activity 6

The 1920s was called the ‘Jazz age’.  Try some improvisation, jazz style, along to this Louis Armstrong track – pick a trumpet, trombone, clarinet, banjo, drums and to make the sound of and improvise along.

You could so the same to some Bessie Smith songs like this one. Bessie was nicknamed the “Empress of the Blues”, she was the most popular female blues singer of the 1920s; imagine you were in this 1920s bar with her.

 

Activity 7

The 1920s was the start of the Art Deco Era.

Make some poses of art deco figurines like these. Many of the figurines involve fans, balls and globes too – see what you can find in your house to recreate the poses. Put these poses to music from the era (such as this radio show from the 1920s).

Use your body to make the angles, arches and fans of the geometric Art Deco designs.

Lots of seaside resorts feature architecture and art work from the Art Deco period of the 1920s. If you’re interested, you could watch this BBC Iplayer documentary called ‘Art Deco by the sea’. Famously, lots of wonderful advertising posters were made for British seaside resorts. Create an advertisement poster of your own featuring your favourite seaside resort, to entice people to visit it!

 

Activity 8

‘Bauhaus’ was an art and design movement in Germany, famous artist such as Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky worked at the Bauhaus during the 1920s.

Paul Klee once said, “Drawing is taking a line for a walk”. Make a drawing that starts from one end of the paper and slowly and deliberately makes its way on a journey, a walk, across the page. Your line could be in any style organic; geometric; whatever reflects your mood in the moment.

Try talking a line for a walk in the air in front of you using your hand or finger. Where will the walk take you to?

 

Activity 9

The Queen was born in Mayfair, London on 21st April 1926, making her 94 years old, and around at the time of all of this history. Make some regal crowns and tiaras to celebrate her birth, and practice your best regal waves.

 

Activity 10

The stadium at Wembley was built in 300 days, completed at speed in readiness for the 1923 FA cup final between Bolton Wanderers and West Ham United.

That match was known as the ‘White Horse Final’ as Billy, a white horse had to be brought on to the pitch to deal with the overcrowding of the spectators. It was thought that the match would not be played because of the number of spectators inside the stadium that had spilled onto the pitch. That was until mounted police, including Police Constable George Scorey and his white horse, Billy, slowly pushed the crowds back to the sides of the field of play for the FA Cup Final to start.

Act out how to Trot, neigh and control a crowd like Billy.

West Ham United’s song is ‘I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles’ – sing it as a group with floating bubbly motions. Or, learn the BSL signs for the song.

Or, you could come up with footballing actions to act out. Pause the song, call out an action and get people to pose as: scoring a goal, goal celebration, saving a goal, taking a penalty, referee blowing a whistle, winning, losing, header, being given the red card, etc.

 

Activity 11

Try saying some 1920s slang in your best ‘posh’/clipped 1920s accents, and acting out situations when it might be used:

‘And how!’ – agreeing with what somebody has just said, enthusiastically/ use instead of “indeed” – e.g. Voice 1: “This bread is delicious”. Voice 2: “And how!”

“Putting on the Ritz” – to dress fancily or fashionably. Ritzy = fancy, lavish, or elegant.

“Ragamuffin” – somebody who looks bedraggled, messy or dirty (like Chaplain’s ‘The Little Tramp’)

“Wet Blanket” – someone who’s a killjoy/buzzkill, who would ruin a good party. The word “Fire” in the 1920s meant something fun and energetic. To throw a wet blanket over the fire would put out the fun.

“Whoopee” – ‘Making whoopee’ is having a really good time.

“Fried” or “Smoked” or “Zozzled” – to be drunk.

“Cheaters” – reading glasses

“Having the Heebie Jeebies” – shaking from fear, or the unknown – like when watched a horror film from the 1920s (Try scatting along with Louis Armstrong in a song of the same name).

 

Activity 12

The first edition of the Radio Times was in September 1923! Design a front cover for the Radio Times, decorated using things that you’ve learned about today from the 1920s.

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

Adventures to Volcanoes

This week’s theme:

Adventures to Volcanoes

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week:

There are about 1,500 potentially active volcanoes worldwide, about 500 of these have erupted over the years.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

A volcano is an opening in the Earth’s surface (or ‘crust’). Usually found in a mountain, the opening allows gas, hot magma and ash to escape from beneath the Earth’s crust.

Volcanoes are often found at meeting points of “tectonic plates”. These plates are broken pieces of the Earth’s surface (or ‘crust’) that fit together just like a jigsaw puzzle. These cracked pieces constantly shift about, and volcanoes form where two of these plates meet and bump up against each other. When this happens it creates friction and pressure, and melted rock (magma) from deep inside the Earth rises up through the opening in the Earth’s surface (or ‘crust’). Eruptions are when that melted rock (magma) and gas shoot up through the opening and spill over, when it does, the magma is now called lava. There are two types of eruptions: Lava can dramatically explode through the opening, shooting debris miles into the air, or it can be effusive, where lava just pours or flows out.

Create a movement piece about volcanoes to remember key words. Create an action for the following words: volcano, earth’s crust, tectonic plate shifting about, build up of friction/pressure, explosive eruptions, effusive eruptions, lava flow, ash cloud, hot hot hot, run away!

 

Activity 2

When a volcano keeps erupting it gets bigger because more and more lava flows over the side. Eventually, the lava cools and it creates another layer of rock. The process repeats itself and the volcano keeps growing. Try this out by adding layers upon layers of clothing on top of each other – can you feel the layers making you bigger?

 

Activity 3

Make some art work using the colours of lava and magma – collect orange and red objects to create table-top lava flow.

Or draw some different shaped volcanoes with colourful lava pouring out, or spewing out. There are two main volcano shapes – Composite Volcanoes, which are cone-shaped with steep slopes, and Shield Volcanoes, which are very wide with gentle slopes. Can you make these shapes with your body too?

 

Activity 4

There are many famous Volcanoes, can you find these ones on a map? Do you already know anything about these countries?

Mt Fuji (Japan)

Mount Vesuvius (Italy)

Krakatoa (Indonesia)

Mount Etna (Italy (Sicily))

Mount St. Helens (United States)

Mauna Loa (Hawaii)- this is the largest active volcano in the world.

Look at some footage from volcano webcams.

 

Activity 5

There’s a horseshoe shaped area in the Pacific Ocean known as the ‘Ring of Fire’. The Ring of Fire maps a string of volcanoes – the ring is dotted with 75% of all active volcanoes on Earth

Have a sing-along/instrument play-along to Johnny Cash’s ‘Ring of Fire’ – come up with some actions too!

 

Activity 6

Volcanoes are classified as active, dormant or extinct. This refers to the amount of volcanic activity. “Active” means there’s regular activity/eruptions, “dormant” means there’s have been eruptions in the past but the volcano is currently quiet, and “extinct” means it’s been so long since the last eruption that it’s unlikely to ever erupt again.

Try a physical activity game, similar to the traffic light game. Active = green = move about quickly, erupt like crazy, be loud. Dormant = Amber = Get Ready, start to gently rumble. Extinct = red = freeze still. Ask somebody to shout these out to you; can you remember which word means which action?

 

Activity 7

With support, try making a mini eruption using the acid in citrus fruit juice, and watch the beautiful bubbly ‘eruption’. You’ll need bicarb of soda, washing up liquid, a drop of food colouring, and try it out with different citrus fruits – lemons, limes, oranges, grapefruits. What do you predict will happen? You could try it with vinegar rather than citrus juice too, what do you think will happen? Test your hypotheses.

Or, try out the hypotheses by making a simple bottle volcano. You’ll need: 1/4 cup vinegar, 2 Tablespoons baking soda, Empty and clean 12 oz. plastic water bottle, Funnel. Use a funnel to put the baking soda into the bottle. When you’re ready for it to erupt, add in the vinegar and watch the lava ooze out. The idea is to get the vinegar in as quickly as possible.

If you want a bigger eruption, you can use more vinegar and baking soda or even a larger bottle. Also, you can add some dish soap and or red/orange food colouring into the bottle before you pour in the vinegar for extra spectacle. This is all probably best done in a washing up bowl as it’s likely to spill!

 

Activity 8

Katia Krafft (1942-1991) was a French volcanologists (somebody who studies Volcanoes), she regularly braved boiling hot lava flows and active eruptions. She often went into erupting volcanoes to study them and to take pictures and videos. Watch some footage here.

It took a lot of bravery to get so close to something so dangerous. Practice your power poses to help make you feel brave and courageous.

 

Activity 9

When volcanologists hear news that a volcano is going to erupt they rush to it and scramble to the crater to watch the lava. To do this very dangerous thing they have to wear protective silver suits and helmets so that they can withstand the heat from the molten lava (which was more than 1000 degrees hot). Make your own tinfoil hat and shoe coverings to set off on your expedition to the summit of a volcano!

 

Activity 10

Make yourself a dried rice/pea/lentil shaker in a plastic tub, or learn some simple body percussion, and play it along in time to this song about Volcanos.

 

Activity 11

The loudest sound in recorded history was made by a volcano called Krakatau (Indonesia). When Krakatau erupted in 1883 it released 200 megatrons of energy – that’s a HUGE ‘Boom’!

Practice conducting loud and quiet sounds, get out your conductor’s baton and make small gently motions at the quiet start of this classical song, as the volume increases, make larger motions with your baton.

 

Activity 12

Play a game of ‘the floor is lava’. Imagine the floor in your house is made of lava. If you step onto the floor you’ll burn your feet. Create some stepping stones (marked out places on the floor) for you to jump between, making sure you don’t land anywhere else and into the lava! What happens when you move your stepping stones further apart? What if the floor is lava all morning – will you remember not to step into the lava as you go about your day?

 

Activity 13

Make a bubbling lava artwork with straws and watered down red, orange and yellow paint.

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures in Storytelling

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week:

National Storytelling Week runs from 30th January to 6th February.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

Name an author who is known for their fabulous storytelling. What do you think makes a great story? What are some different types of story?

Stories belong to everyone…what’s your story? Tell what happened in your week. Or your story of the best thing that’s ever happened to you. Or the story of your favourite holiday. Etc.

 

Activity 2

Come up with 3 element stories…

Try creating a story below, following 1. 2. and 3. Then mix things up to create nonsense stories by matching any 3 elements!

 

#1 Is trapped in #2 by #3.

 

#1. A sheriff  #2. A saloon  #3. A gang of outlaws

#1. A robot  #2. A Space Prison  #3. An alien invasion

#1. A prince  #2. A Dark Forest  #3. A wicked sorceress

#1. A fairy    #2. A bottle  #3. A wicked stepmother

#1. An astronaut   #2. A Space Ship  #3. Bad Weather Conditions

 

Can you add any of your own?

Can you draw the 3 elements in panels like a comic strip?

 

Activity 3

Act out these stories from different cultures around the world (can you find them on a map?) Make and create props. Wear costumes. Do actions. Make sounds.

 

USA – Paul Bunyan (a tall tale).

Many years ago, Paul Bunyan was born in the northeastern American state of Maine. His mother and father were shocked when they first saw the boy. Paul was so large at birth that five large birds had to carry him to his parents. When the boy was only a few weeks old, he weighed more than forty-five kilograms.

As a child, Paul was always hungry. His parents needed ten cows to supply milk for his meals. Before long, he ate fifty eggs and ten containers of potatoes every day. He could eat 50 pancakes in one minute.

Young Paul grew so big that his parents did not know what to do with him. Once, Paul rolled over so much in his sleep that he caused an earthquake. This angered people in the town where his parents lived. So, the government told his mother and father they would have to move him somewhere else.

Paul’s father built a wooden cradle — a traditional bed for a baby. His parents put the cradle in waters along the coast of Maine. However, every time Paul rolled over, huge waves covered all the coastal towns. So his parents brought their son back on land. They took him into the woods. This is where he grew up.

As a boy, Paul helped his father cut down trees. In those days, much of North America was filled with thick, green forests. Paul Bunyan could clear large wooded areas with a single stroke of his large, sharp axe. Paul had the strength of many men. He also was extremely fast. He could turn off a light and then jump into his bed before the room got dark.

Maine is very cold for much of the year. One day, it started to snow. The snow covered Paul’s home and a nearby forest. However, this snow was very unusual. It was blue. The blue snow kept falling until the forest was covered. Paul put on his snowshoes and went out to see the unusual sight. As he walked, Paul discovered an animal stuck in the snow. It was a baby ox. Paul decided to take the ox home with him. He put the animal near the fireplace. After the ox got warmer, his hair remained blue.

Paul decided to keep the blue ox and named him Babe. Babe grew very big very quickly.

In time, Paul and Babe the Blue Ox left Maine, and moved west to look for work in other forests. Along the way, Paul dug out the Great Lakes to provide drinking water for Babe. They settled in a camp near the Onion River in the state of Minnesota.

Paul’s camp was the largest in the country. The camp was so large that a man had to have one week’s supply of food when walking from one side of the camp to the other.

Paul Bunyan and Babe left their mark on many areas. Some people say they were responsible for creating Puget Sound in the western state of Washington. Others say Paul Bunyan and Babe cleared the trees from the states of North Dakota and South Dakota. Others say he dug the Grand Canyon with his axe.

Whatever happened to Paul Bunyan? There are lots of stories. Some people say he was last seen in Alaska, or even the Arctic Circle. Another tradition says he still returns to Minnesota every summer.

(Can you continue the Paul Bunyan story – what tall tales can you come up with him to do next? Where would he go on holiday – how would he fit on an aeroplane?)

 

Australia – The First Sunrise. The First Sunrise takes place long ago when the earth was dark. The animals struggled to find food and had to crawl on the ground to avoid heavy clouds that hung low to the ground. The magpies got all of the animals to work together to raise the sky. They grab sticks and push it up and up until the sky breaks open above the mountains. A warm light pours out over all the land, and the magpies break out in song. In the story, every day is a celebration of this first beautiful sunrise, and that’s what makes the magpies sing so beautifully.

(You could also sing/do actions to ‘Morning Has Broken’ by Cat Stevens).

 

Spain – The Magic Mirror.

The King of Granada is looking for a wife, but there is one stipulation: whoever wants to be his wife must look into a magic mirror that judges the goodness of her character, and will show as many blemishes on the mirror as she has made mistakes in her life. All of the women, at first eager to marry the king, refuse to look into the mirror. Only one comes forward: a lowly shepherdess. Upon being challenged by the magic mirror, the shepherdess says that she is not afraid because everyone makes mistakes and can be forgiven. After she looks into the mirror, the king reveals that there was no magic mirror, but that he was instead testing their confidence in themselves.

(Can you look in a mirror and say one positive thing about what you see?)

 

China – The Island of the Sun.

Two brothers, one greedy and one generous, inherit their father’s farmland after he dies. The greedy brother takes it all, leaving his younger brother with only a basket and a knife. The young, kind brother is approached by a huge bird who flies him to the Island of the Sun where he can take one piece of gold. He buys a comfortable life with his gold, but his brother becomes jealous and wants a chance at the gold, so he lures the bird in by acting poor. At the Island of the Sun he is promised one gold coin, but he greedily takes more. Soon he discovers the bird has left him there to burn in the sun.

 

Somalia – The Lion with the Red.

This is a story about accepting people for who they are and respecting their beliefs when they are different to yours. In a small village in Somalia, people raised lions as their guardians. One day a lion with red eyes was born and named Bahdoon. Bahdoon is banished from the pride for his strange eyes, and he grows up alone, admiring the brave lions of his pride from afar. When the village is attacked by a dragon, Bahdoon watches his pride losing but is afraid to join in. After multiple nights of attacks he cannot stand to see the suffering anymore, so he joins the fight. Bahdoon is the only lion that can defeat the dragon, and once he does his pride accepts him again, realizing that he should never have been treated differently.

 

Activity 4

Create and tell a sensory story. Use sounds (voice, instrument, sound effects, Foley), textures, touches, tastes, smells, sights (colours, lights, bubbles).

 

Or try telling an existing story with sensory things you can find at home – take the Paul Bunyan story above. At the correct parts of the story can you touch feathers, smell potatoes, taste milk, small maple syrup for pancakes, create rumbling earthquake sounds, touch wooden items and soft bedding items, touch water, touch/smell woodland leaves, play woodland sound effects, find bright green woodland fabrics, turn torches off quickly, etc etc.

 

Activity 5

Telling stories gives us the opportunity to express emotion and to use our imaginations with a freedom no other medium can offer.

Play an imagination game – This is not a pen, it’s a …

Act out these different emotions that are often found in stories: happiness, love, sadness, fear, struggle, curiosity, triumph. What others can you think of?

 

Activity 6

Stories are full of characters to like and dislike! Can you explore some character traits? – Dress up as different characters and act them out! You could try: Honest, Brave, Silly, Strong, Bossy, Funny, Greedy, Selfish, Adventurous, Mean, Kind, Sad.

Who would be your perfect character – how would they move – how would they sound? Try drawing them!

 

Activity 7

Look at some traditional beginnings and endings of stories. Can you pick one beginning, one ending and fill in the middle by enthusiastically saying ‘AND THEN’ or ‘WHEN SUDDENLY’ (with dramatic noises/percussion, or actions) and follow it with a suggestion for the next part of story?

 

Beginnings:

It was a dark and stormy night …

Once upon a time in a land far, far away…

It was a beautiful summer’s day…

It was the night before Christmas…

In Korean, a typical fairy tale begins: “Once, in the old days…”

In Catalan, spoken in the north-east of Spain, a story may start with, “Once upon a time in a corner of the world where everybody had a nose…”

Polish fairy tales often begin, “Beyond seven mountains, beyond seven forests…”

Some Indian stories start with “Beyond seven rivers and seven seas…”

 

Endings:

Then I woke up and realised it was all a dream.

So everyone was pleased, and lived happily ever after.

German fairytales typically end: “And if they didn’t die, they’re still alive today.”

 

Activity 8

Listen to some of the ‘tunes with a tale’ below, and hear how stories can be told through music. What stories about Purple Patch might you like to tell and pass on in song form? Create your own story songs/raps/rhythmical or body percussion poems.

‘Fast Car’ by Tracy Chapman; “One Piece At A Time” by Jonny Cash; ‘Papa was a rolling stone’ by The Temptations; ‘David’s Last Summer’ by Pulp; “Copacabana” by Barry Manilow.

 

Activity 9

Listen to, and interact with this video of Grace storytelling, recorded in Summer 2020.

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

A sense of Adventure: Gameshows

This week’s theme:

A sense of Adventure: Gameshows

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week:

In the USA the 29th January is National Puzzle Day, to celebrate we’re going to imagine we’re on Gameshows and Quiz Shows!

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

Do you have a sparkly outfit to act as a games show host? How many Game shows and Quiz shows can you name? Can you remember any Gameshow catchphrases? Can you make the family fortunes ‘incorrect answer’ noise? Can you act out playing stringed instruments to The Chase theme tune, or clocks to the Countdown theme tune? Try a theme tune quiz. Make some buzzer sounds that you’ll make when you want to give your answer for the rest of the session. Draw/make yourself  a trophy to hold up when you successfully compete the following rounds…

 

Activity 2

Would I Lie To You

On this show people have to work out which statement is true and which is false. What do these words mean?

(A) Try a fact or fiction quiz… make yourself paddles to hold up that say ‘Fact’ and ‘Fiction’.

  1. Madonna’s real name is Madonna.
  2. Prince Harry is taller than Prince William.
  3. M&Ms stands for ‘Melanie & Melanie’.
  4. Idina Menzel sings ‘let it go’ 20 times in ‘Let It Go’ from Frozen.
  5. The unicorn is the national animal of Scotland.
  6. There are 5 different senses.

Try writing some fact/fiction questions of your own relating to things you know, or have learned over the past year at Purple Patch.

 

(B) Try a true or false quiz. One of these 3 answers is true, which is it…

  1. What does ABBA stand for? Is it:

(a) All Breakfasts (are) Better (with) Alpen

(b) Agnetha, Björn, Benny, Anni

(c) A Brilliant Band Alright

  1. Which of these is a real character in Harry Potter? Is it:

(a) Luna Lovegood

(b) Harry Spotter

(c) Rob Weasle

  1. Which of these is not a real fruit? Is it:

(a) Dewberry

(b) Ugli Fruit

(c) Silver fruit

  1. Which one of these does Rick Astley say he’s never going to do? Is it:

(a) Never Gonna Give you up

(b) Never Gonna Make your tea

(c) Never Gonna Drive you home

Come up with some of your own!

 

Answers – a1: Fact a2; Fiction a3: Fiction a4: Fiction, a5: Fact a6: Fact. B1: (b) Agnetha, Björn, Benny, Anni. B2: (a) Luna Lovegood. B3: (c) Silver fruit. B4: (a) Never Gonna Give you up.

 

Activity 3

Taskmaster

On this show competitors have to complete ridiculous tasks (like drawing a picture of a horse while riding a horse). Have a go at some of these silly tasks, or come up with your own…

What’s the silliest thing you can find to balance on your head?

How long can you blow a raspberry for?

Can you say your name backwards?

Can you say some tongue twisters quickly? Try these!

What’s the funniest dance you can do to your favourite song?

 

Activity 4

The Cube is a TV gameshow where people have to complete deceptively simple physical tasks.

Try out some physical tasks – Can you move to the other side of the room with a pen/book/cushion balanced on your head? Which is easiest/hardest?

Can you rub your tummy and pat your head at the same time?

Can you rotate one arm forwards while the other is rotating backwards?

Can you wiggle your nose? Can you wiggle your ears?

Can you use body percussion to play a song?

Now, come up with some physical challenges of your own.

 

Activity 5

Win Lose or Draw – was a drawing game, a bit like Pictionary.

Can you draw any these clues without using any words? Can anybody in your house work out what you’ve drawn?

Place: Disneyland, New York

Book: The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, The Big Friendly Giant, Black Beauty

Song: Walking on Sunshine, Roar, Shake It Off,

Superheroes: Spiderman, Ironman, Batgirl

Film: Toy Story

TV Show: Coronation Street, Britain’s Got Talent

Come up with ones of your own!

 

Activity 6

Supermarket Sweep

Instead of dashing round a supermarket, can you dash around their house to bring back the following shopping list:

A blue object

A soft object

A metal object

A paper object

A gold object

A tiny object.

Add some more things of your own to the shopping list!

 

Activity 7

Countdown

Can you do things before the Countdown clock runs down?

How many fruits you shout out before the clock finishes? Try and top your total by trying to name as many animated films as you can before the next clock runs down.

Keep going with different categories (ideas: ice cream flavours, pizza toppings, characters on your favourite soap, friends at Purple Patch, etc).

 

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

 

Adventures in Black History

This week’s theme:

Adventures in Black History

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week:

The 18th of January is Martin Luther King Day, celebrating the life and achievements of Martin Luther King Jr., an influential American civil rights leader. He is most well-known for his campaigns to end racial segregation, and for racial equality in the United States.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

Martin Luther King Jr was an influential American civil rights leader. Our civil rights are something that we want to protect as they make sure that we all get treated fairly, and make sure that we get to live our lives without discrimination (unfairness) or repression (being held back). Dr King was specifically interested in the rights of Black people to be treated kindly and fairly.

 

Dr King did a lot of work to try and stop racism in the United States. Racism is where someone treats another person differently because their skin colour is not the same as theirs, they speak a different language or have different religious beliefs, for example. This is unfair, we shouldn’t behave differently to another person based on the colour of their skin or culture, but it still happens a lot. Nobody is better than anybody else just because of the colour of their skin. We also shouldn’t make assumptions about somebody based on their colour or culture, this is sometimes called ‘racial discrimination’.

 

To explore fairness and discrimination, make a list or draw all of all the things you like doing. Think of the emotions you would feel if you were stopped from doing those things because somebody else didn’t like your hairstyle, shoes, or hair colour. Act out the emotions.

 

Play a game of Fair or Not Fair – which of these statements do people think is fair (come up with an action or noise) or unfair (come up with a noise or action):

  • Drivers who drive too fast are given speeding tickets.
  • Purple staff get to mute anybody on zoom for not wearing the right coloured clothes.
  • Men get paid more than women for the same piece of work.
  • You get the blame for something you didn’t do.
  • Somebody pushes in front of you in the queue at the shops.
  • The bus driver allows you to use your pass on the bus and doesn’t make you pay.

Come up with your own suggestions of things that are fair / not fair.

 

Activity 2

MLK sought to end the racial segregation (something that keeps people apart and makes things separate) of Black and white people. It used to be the case that Black people weren’t allowed to eat in restaurants designated for white people, had to sit in different parts of the bus to the white people, had to use separate water fountains, etc.

 

Read, or ask somebody read to you the story ‘Why Frogs and Snakes Never Play Together’ about how people can sometimes pass on unjust fears, assumptions, and discriminations to others and create segregation. Try writing your own ending to the story in which the snakes and frogs remain friends.

 

Activity 3

Dr King made an iconic speech in 1963 entitled ‘I have a dream’. In the speech he spoke about the necessity for change, and the potential for hope in American society.

The change Dr King was looking for was for Black Americans to have equal rights as everybody else (i.e. fairness for Black people) and freedom from segregation and discrimination, and he hoped for the end of racism in the United States.

 

Come up with your own hopes, dreams and wishes:

I have a Dream…

For myself:

For my community:

For the world:

You could draw the hopes on speech bubbles or thought bubbles and hold them up next to your head as if they were your dreams.

 

Activity 4

On Martin Luther King day, Americans are encouraged to give some of their time on this day as volunteers for good causes.

Volunteer to do something for good today, either for your friends at Purple Patch, your friends/family at home, or for the world. Think back to your kindness resolutions from week 16, can you volunteer to make any more of those come true?

 

Activity 5

Being different to other people in a group isn’t a bad thing. Other people being a bit different to us isn’t something that’s wrong and is never a reason for us to pick on them for. We all have the right to be happy whatever we look like. We’re all unique and different and do things in our own ways – it’s what makes us special.

 

Think of different ways to complete tasks; we all do them slightly differently and all of those different ways are right. How many different ways can you think of to travel from one side of the room to the other – you could wheel in a wheelchair, sprint, hop, moon-walk, etc – give them all a go. How many different ways can you write your name on a piece of paper? How many different ways can you greet somebody? How many different ways can you draw a flower? Try them all! Come up with your own!

 

Activity 6

Another influential Black person is Harriet Tubman. Harriet Tubman was an African American woman who escaped slavery and then helped nearly 300 other slaves escape to freedom too.

Slavery is where people are owned by other people who then control where they live and what they do, including making the slave work for them. Slaves are not free to do what they like. what do you think that would be like? How would it make you feel?

 

Harriet Tubman was born into slavery in the USA, but in 1849 she made a stunning escape. Later she returned to guide nearly 300 other slaves to freedom along the Underground Railroad.

The Underground Railroad was a network of helpful people, safe houses (called ‘stations’) and secret routes, tunnels and back roads to help slaves escape. The people that helped the slaves escape were called ‘conductors’. Slaves would move from station to station at night, hiding in the woods or sneaking onto trains until they finally reached the north and freedom.

 

Mark out different areas on your floor that create a route (this could be done with masking tape, or areas numbered with post-it notes, for example). Move between these destinations along your route by hopping or jumping or moving ‘station-to-station’. Have somebody hide objects (such as balled up socks) in these places that you can help rescue, pick up, collect and take with you on your journey ‘North’ to the final destination on your route.

 

Activity 7

Harriet Tubman once said, “Always remember you have within you the strength, the patience and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world”.

 

Reach into the sky with your arms as tall as you can when listening to this song.

 

Slaves escaping on the Underground Railroad could use the stars to help them navigate. The North Star was used to find north. Repeat activity 1, but instead of jumping station-to-station, cut out stars from card and paper, decorate or colour them and place them on the floor. Move between the stars and follow them on your journey across your room in the direction of the biggest star at the end, the North star.

 

The North Star can be found in the sky by looking for the constellation (group of stars) known as the Big and Little Dippers. The North Star is the star at the end of the “handle” of the Little Dipper (also referred to as a ‘Ladle’). Play a game of ‘This Is Not A Ladle’ with a ladle or big spoon as a prop to act out your suggestion. This is not a ladle, it’s an arrow pointing my way home. This is not a ladle, it’s a microphone! This is not a ladle it’s an oar to paddle my boat to India.

 

Try and learn the directions on a compass: north, south, east, and west? Typically these have been remembered by saying ‘Never Eat Shredded Wheat’ – can you come up with your own Mnemonics (using the first letter of each word)? Write them down, illustrate them.

 

Activity 8

The journeys that the slaves took were difficult, and Harriet’s great task to guide people to freedom was a huge and brave challenge.

 

Create a lantern like Harriet’s which she used to guide people along their path to freedom. You could either make a  paper lantern using this template and cutting along the lines. Or shine a torch under a jar or bottle filled with water and glitter.

 

Act out walking a path holding your lantern up to find the North Star. Listen to the song, ‘Follow the Drinking Gourd’ here as you walk your path, the “drinking gourd” alludes to the hollowed out vegetable used by slaves as a water dipper (like a cup). Used here it is a code name for the Big Dipper star formation, which points to the North as a reminder that if people ever got lost they should walk in the direction of the North Star.

 

Activity 9

Cut out lots of stars (from paper, card, or magazines), and attaching them to string, make a garland of stars to stretch across your room to represent the route of the Underground Railroad. i.e. the distance between were the slaves were escaping in the South, to where Harriet successfully transported them to, e.g. Pennsylvania in the North, which was a free state.

 

Activity 10

Harriet Tubman used disguises to avoid getting caught on her journeys. She dressed as a man, old woman or middle class free African American. Make your own disguise by wearing unusual clothing, or making yourself a mask.

 

Activity 11

Songs were used in everyday life by slaves. Singing served many purposes such as providing rhythm for repetitive manual work, inspiration and motivation. Songs were used as tools to remember and communicate since the majority of slaves could not read. Make repetitive rhythms with your body (clapping, tapping, stomping) in time to this song.

 

Harriet Tubman and other slaves also used songs as a strategy to communicate. Coded songs contained code words giving directions on how to escape also known as ‘signal songs’ or where to meet known as ‘map songs’. For example, if a slave heard ‘Sweet Chariot’ they would know they had to get ready to escape as people were coming to take them to freedom…i.e. The Underground Railroad (sweet chariot) is coming south (swing low) to take the slave to the north or freedom (carry me home). This was one of Tubman’s favourite songs. Listen to the song here and join in singing, or do actions every time you hear ‘Coming for to carry me home’.

 

Activity 12

One of the reasons Harriet is special is due to how she repeatedly risked her own life to rescue and help many other people. Her story is an inspiring message of hope, strength, and generosity. Harriet has been compared to a bird soaring across the night sky, fluttering back down to the ground to help others fly too. Make a bird from a bun case like this, soaring in the sky.

 

Activity 13

To make sure they didn’t get lost on their journey to freedom, people kept an eye out for freedom quilts on their routes. These quilts were made by kind people who wanted to help others escape, and the quilts contained secret codes and symbols, such as specific patterns that meant ‘you should begin to pack for the journey’ and ‘you should get ready to escape’, or used as ways to alert people towards food, the way north, and danger. Because quilts were such an American tradition, they could be hung on porches or displayed on fences without attracting much attention.

 

Draw a large grid and in each square draw a different pattern or symbol, what would your patterns and symbols mean?

Cut squares and triangles from different coloured or textured materials; glue them down in your own quilt pattern.

 

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

Adventurous News – This Week in History

This week’s theme:

Adventurous News – This Week in History

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week: This week was a very busy week in the past. In the news there was molasses, top hats, museum openings, lottery draws, batman, famous number ones, opera conducting, and Mickey Mouse!!

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

On January 15, 1919 two million gallons of molasses flooded Boston Massachusetts in the “Great Molasses Flood” when a storage tank burst. 21 people sadly drowned and 150 were injured.

Create a movement piece – Imagine walking in sticky molasses and getting stuck to the floor, you wouldn’t get anywhere in a hurry! Imagine swimming in molasses, slow and thick. Imagine licking it off your arms. Imagine getting stuck to things. Imagine your fingers sticking together, then your hands, then your arms. What if your arm got stuck to your hair – to release it you’ll have to use your other arm, then that’ll get stuck in your hair. Put your movements to create a sticky dance to ‘Stuck in the middle with you’, ‘Sugar sugar’, ‘Sugartime’, or this song about Molasses.

 

Activity 2

It was reported in the news on January 15 1797 that a top hat caused quite a stir… Haberdasher (hat maker) John Hetherington, on this day, appeared in court after he had stepped out onto the streets of London wearing the first ever top hat. It caused a sensation. So much so that a crowd formed and Hetherington was eventually arrested and given a summons for disturbing the public peace. In court he was found guilty of wearing a hat that “calculated to frighten timid people”, and disturbing the peace, and was fined £50. The arresting officer told the court that nobody had seen anything like it before: “He had such a tall and shiny construction on his head that it must have terrified nervous people. The sight of this construction was so overstated that various women fainted, children began to cry and dogs started to bark. One child broke his arm among all the jostling.”

The next day, The Times newspaper reported: “Hetherington’s hat points to a significant advance in the transformation of dress. Sooner or later, everyone will accept this headwear. We believe that both the court and the police made a mistake here.” The newspaper was right. The top hat, which went by several names including Toppers, Chimney Pots, and Stove Pipes, grew in popularity, finally achieving the ultimate stamp of respectability in 1850 when Prince Albert, no less, began to wear one, giving the headgear the royal seal of approval. There was no going back after that . . .

Act out the pandemonium and shock seen when the top hat was first worn. Make and wear your own top hat. Or, become a haberdasher for the day and design or make your own outlandish hats that could cause a sensation!

 

Activity 3

The British Museum opened to visitors on January 15th 1759. Fearing damage to the collections by unruly hordes, nobody was admitted without a ticket.

Design a special ticket to a grand opening.

Act out a grand opening, how will you cut the ribbon, what speech will you give, what fine clothes will you be wearing, what nibbles will there be to eat, will you rush to be first in?

 

Activity 4

On 12th January 1966 “Batman”, starring Adam West as Batman, Burt Ward as Robin, and Cesar Romero as The Joker, debuted on TV

Try some of these Batman activities.

Try some of these Joker activities.

 

Activity 5

Search YouTube for these songs that were number 1s during this week in history. How many songs do you recognise? Come up with actions/dance moves for each. Play along with instruments/body percussion to each. Or have a ‘This week in history’ disco!

1956       ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK               – BILL HALEY & HIS COMETS

1958       GREAT BALLS OF FIRE – JERRY LEE LEWIS

1962       THE YOUNG ONES – CLIFF RICHARD & THE SHADOWS

1968       HELLO GOODBYE – BEATLES

1972       I’D LIKE TO TEACH THE WORLD TO SING – NEW SEEKERS

1976       BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY – QUEEN

1979       Y.M.C.A. – VILLAGE PEOPLE

1981       IMAGINE – JOHN LENNON

1982       DON’T YOU WANT ME – HUMAN LEAGUE

1986       WEST END GIRLS – PET SHOP BOYS

1987       REET PETITE – JACKIE WILSON

1989       ESPECIALLY FOR YOU – KYLIE MINOGUE & JASON DONOVAN

1993       I WILL ALWAYS LOVE YOU – WHITNEY HOUSTON

1995       COTTON EYE JOE – REDNEX

1997       2 BECOME 1 – SPICE GIRLS

1999       TRAGEDY – STEPS

2002       GOTTA GET THRU THIS – DANIEL BEDINGFIELD

2010       BAD ROMANCE – LADY GAGA

2014       TIMBER – PITBULL FT. KESHA

2016       LOVE YOURSELF – JUSTIN BIEBER

2018       PERFECT – ED SHEERAN

 

Activity 6

In 1976 Sarah Caldwell became the 1st woman to conduct at NYC Metropolitan Opera House as she led orchestra in a performance of “La Traviata”

Listen to some classical music and try some conducting – when the music goes faster and slower, louder and quieter, make bigger and smaller actions with your conductor’s baton.

Try acting out some operatic terms – try making the face needed to sing with a ‘Soprano’ voice  then try making high pitched sounds. Then try bass voices – opposite of soprano – a deep voice, can you say, ho ho ho, and  ‘ooooh’ in your deepenst voice.

The plot of La Traviata takes place in Paris in the late 1950’s. Violetta Valéry, a young courtesan, famous in the Parisian high society, throws a party in her home. Act out throwing a high-class party – what posh outfit will you wear, what will you be served, how would you act and dance – (try some of the deportment, grace and elocution tips and tricks from Orient Express Week Activity 3). Try acting out your party scene to music from the Opera.

 

Activity 7

The first “Mickey Mouse” comic strip appeared on January 13, 1930. Create some cartoon characters of your own to appear in your own comic strip. What colours will they be, what will they be called, what will they resemble? What story can you tell with your character that will  fit into just 4 or 5 panels?

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures in Kindness

This week’s theme:

Adventures in Kindness

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week: Kindness is “contagious” – research shows that people are more likely to do kind acts when they see others being kind as well. Kindness can also create contagious feelings of joy.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

Think about who you’d like to thank for everything they did to help & support you, or for making you happy, last year? Make a thank you card/poster/art/poem/letter for them.

 

Activity 2

Create some New Year Resolution about kindness, friendship and gratitude. You could write them down/make an illustrated sign to bring out throughout the year to remind yourself and check how you’re doing with them!

Make a certificate to be a member of the 2021 Purple Kindness Club. The club’s motto could be the resolution you decided on.

 

Activity 3

Draw a jar to ‘store’ positive words in. write down your positive words that you could come back to and remind yourself of at a later date when you need a boost. If you find it hard to think of something positive, try making a jar like this that makes you think about a positive word starting with the initials of people you know.

 

Activity 4

Have you filled a bucket today? We all contribute to the happiness of others by the things that we do and say towards them. We are either filling or emptying their “happiness buckets” at all times, while also affecting our own happiness in so doing. Draw and fill buckets with happy objects, happy thoughts, things you know others like. Top each other people’s buckets up throughout the day. Does somebody you know like dinosaurs – draw one in their bucket. Does somebody love ABBA – sing them a song and then pop ABBA in their bucket, etc.

 

Activity 5

There’s tonnes of famous friendships where the pair look out for each other and are kind to each other…

Activity 5a:

Pooh, Piglet & Eeyore are kind to each other, especially when one of them isn’t feeling too great. Draw the things that you’d ordinarily do to help cheer up a friend who was feeling a bit sad. You could then send or show the picture to that person to let them know you’re thinking about them.

Activity 5b:

Timon & Pumbaa sing ‘Hakuna Matata’ together to symbolise their no worries philosophy that binds them together. Try playing along to the song with shakers and body percussion. Or come up with some actions for key words.

Activity 5c:

All of the characters in Toy Story are constantly helping each other out and being kind each other – learn the Makaton signs to the chorus of ‘You’ve Got A Friend In Me’.

Activity 5d:

Bill and Ted’s friendship stays true in all of their adventures, from Ancient Greece to the wild West, because they adhere to the motto: “Be excellent to each other”. Be excellent by recreating the best air guitar solos you can manage!

Activity 5e:

There’s lots of kindness on show in the TV show, ‘Friends’ – Come up with actions for the chorus to ‘I’ll be there for you’:

I’ll be there for you (When the rain starts to pour)

I’ll be there for you (Like I’ve been there before)

I’ll be there for you (‘Cause you’re there for me too)

Make a ‘band’ to recreate the rest of the song – you’ll need to play guitar, drums, bass, and do the claps!

Activity 5f:

In the book/film ‘Pollyanna’ the character hangs crystals in the bedroom window of somebody who is feeling a bit grumpy. This act of kindness completely changes the grumpy woman’s mood; she loves the sunlight shining through the crystals and the rainbows that they produce. Create your own window light catcher (would work well with sweet wrappers left over from Christmas chocolate in the gaps!) or make a rainbow with sunlight or torchlight on a CD to bring happy rays of light into your room.

 

Activity 6

The Lion and the Mouse is an ‘Aesops Fable’ about kindness. It’s hard to always be kind. Sometimes you just don’t feel like it! This fable reminds us that it’s best to be nice even when it’s hard or we don’t feel like it because we may need some kindness too someday! The moral of the story is that “No Act of Kindness, No Matter How Small, Is Ever Wasted”. Try acting out the different parts of the tale, as seen here, or coming up with actions or sound effects for it.

You could also act out the poem, ‘Alex the Alley Cat’ By Wes Fessler.

 

Activity 7

Make your own kindness story to act out using this story structure.

 

Activity 8

Although many of us are kind to the people (and pets!) around us, we often forget to be kind to ourselves.  When our thoughts become unkind it can be tricky to turn them around.

For moments like these, the Blurt Foundation has designed a pack of ‘Kind Cards Unkind Days’ – the pack of playing cards all feature a different statement so that when you pick a card at random from the pack you can read something lovely/funny/encouraging that might help you to turn your thoughts around. The cards say things like ‘‘you are even better than a chocolate bar’, ‘imagine that you are flying the batmobile’, and ‘you are shiny like a unicorn’.

Come up with some statements that you can create a card for, decorate them and keep the cards for when you might need them.

 

Activity 9

Be kind to yourself and be kind to your mind by spending a few minutes having a good giggle!

Watch this clip of a contagious smile. Does it spread to you?

Try some laughter yoga.

Watch some comedians online. Watch other people laugh uncontrollably.. Pull funny faces, make funny sounds. Mime funny actions. Throw imaginary custard pies at people in your house. Draw a smile to give to somebody else. Tell jokes. Practice tiny polite laughs and big belly laughs. Laugh like the Joker. Laugh like Mutley.

Try singing along to some funny songs or songs with funny actions (like this).

Try some funny Tongue Twisters! Start with the short, simple tongue twisters – try repeating them over & over, and try saying them faster & faster! Try some more with Anna here.

 

Activity 10

Be kind to yourself – take some quiet calm time for you to relax and be mindful, you could try some mindful drawing like this from Ailsa.  Enjoy your own company, and feel peaceful as you create. There’s no stress, it doesn’t have to be perfect or look like Ailsa’s, create whatever you want, and take as much time as you’d like. You could try mindful doodling too. You could also look at any of these mindful activities.

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures to Lapland

This week’s theme:

Adventures to… Lapland

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week: Lapland is in the North of Finland. It is known for its vast subarctic wilderness, ski resorts and natural phenomena including the midnight sun and the Northern Lights

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

Find Lapland on the map – Lapland is Finland’s northernmost region, it is an area where not many people live and is often covered in snow. It borders Sweden, Norway, Russia and the Baltic Sea. How would you travel there? What would you need for a trip to Lapland, which is in the Arctic circle? Practice walking in snow.

The national costume of Lapland is called gakti, which is primarily bright blue and red and worn with reindeer-skin boots, colourful shawls and hats. Find some blue and red items of clothing to wear as you do these activities.

 

Activity 2

Lapland is the homeland of the indigenous Sami people, (this homeland also extends into neighbouring countries, of Norway, Sweden and Russia). People living in Lapland often speak two languages, Finnish, and the native Northern Sami language. Signs are written in both, so that everybody can understand. People who speak 2 languages are known as ‘bilingual’ Try leaning to say some Sami words, such as numbers or days of the week. Or try the many ways that you can say hello and goodbye in Finnish. Try greeting everybody in your house Finnish. Warning, they’re quite tricky languages, and some of the words require you to roll your tongue (if you need tongue-rolling practice, singing and dancing along to ‘Reet Petite’ is always good fun!)

 

Activity 3

Imagine you live up there in the North of Finland in the subarctic woodland wilderness in temperatures below zero, surrounded by snow and ice.  Wrap up warm, and listen to a song sung in Sami – come up with some gentle snowflake actions to dance along to the music with. Ice makes magnificent frozen shapes – swirling shapescurling shapesjagged shapes and spiky shapes. Draw spikes, swirls, curls and jagged edges in the air with your finger. Can you then draw these same shapes with your whole body, moving in a slow icy dance while listening to the Sami song.

Look at this snowflake poem – can you make it into a song, with a rhythm to beat out or with instruments to play, and with actions for each line?

 

Activity 4

As well as wrapping up warm, you could design yourself a cosy bobble hat. Try dabbing your watery paint with kitchen roll to create the texture of a knitted pattern. Try using white crayon/oil pastel, or rubbing a wax candle to make a wintery design, the paint won’t stick to those white areas and will make a nice resist painted pattern.

 

Activity 5

Make a Lapland forest snow scene like this – if you don’t have white paint to flick, or splash, or finger paint for snow, try a light dusting of icing sugar or flour when things are dry.

 

Activity 6

Because Lapland is so close to the Arctic circle, it experiences many natural phenomena including:

 

The midnight sun –  in the summer the sun in Lapland sometimes never sets and for 73 days each year, the sun is visible round the clock without any darkness. You can even still see the sun at midnight. Act like a bright, cheerful ray of sunshine to be seen all day – how will you show it on your face and in your body – act out the rays stretching and shining all day. Come up with a cheerful sun dance, you could even use torches to cast light. You could dance to a cheerful sunny dance to songs such as this, or this, or this, or this (from 2:14). How many bright yellow items can you find to build a cheerful, bright, sunshiny sun display?

 

Polar nights (also known as ‘Kaamos’) is a mystical period between December and January when the sun does not rise at all, so it is night time for 24 hours a day – throw a sheet or blanket over your head and shoulders to create a dark polar night at any time of day.

 

Sun Dogs and Moon Dogs are phenomenons that happen when sun or moon lights reflects off the ice particles in the air. Make the shapes of sun and moon dogs in the air. Wonder at their beauty!

 

Lapland is one of the best places in the world to view the Northern Lights. The northern lights are a natural light show, and it looks so good in Lapland due to the special winds which ensure that cloud rarely forms and the skies are kept clear.

Using flashing or glowing torches, nightlights, room lights, mobile phones, fairy lights and swishing coloured fabrics, create your own lights show.

Imagine watching the Northern Lights whilst stood in the snow in Lapland. Act out with your arms in the air the swirls of colour filling the night sky – the wisps of  green, the swish of blue, the flash of pinks, the swirls of purples, the bands of yellow, and the twinkle of stars. Sometimes the swirls in the sky look like the skirt of a dancer. Try dancing with some ‘skirtography’, either by wearing a skirt or tucking sheets/teatowels into your waistband to swish and swirl like the night sky colours.

With coloured chalk, cotton wool to smudge, and a cardboard mountain cut-out, create your own Northern Lights artwork.

 

Activity 7

Levi is a tourist resort in Finnish Lapland, it’s best known for its snow filled winter ski slopes.

Try some skiing postures – try bending from side to side on your skis, try the correct arm positions, (bring your dinner trays!), try tucking yourself up and sticking your bum out for the steep downhill slopes, make yourself flat and long when you take your massive jumps, make some ‘snow plough’ v shapes to stop. Use these positions, and try some general skiing actions out when dancing to the Ski Sunday theme tune.

Try perfecting your balance on your skis. Hold a tray (or book) out in front of you and try a slalom (weaving in a zig zag, bending from side to side, heading left then right). Place some balls (or balls of tin foil) on your tray – can you zig zag to the left and right without dropping your balls?

 

Activity 8

Some Lapland holiday resorts also offer ice swimming!! Brrrr!

Set the scene and act out the following steps, with actions and sound effects: Leave your warm house all snug near the fire. Put on your swimming costume. Open the door and step outside into the falling snow. Run like mad through deep snow to reach the ice pool as quick as you can. The whistling icy wind nips at your exposed skin. You get goose bumps over your arms and legs. Take a deep breath. Talk yourself into it. Rub to warm your cold skin up. Count yourself down, 3,2,1. Dive or Jump into the water. Hit the icy water with a splash. The cold takes your breath away. Take some swimming strokes, surrounded by ice and snow. Give us your best ‘brrrrrr!’ Jump out and wrap yourself in a towel. Run back inside and have a warm cup of tea.

Think how you felt on your ice swim. Make a poem to sum it up, using the letters of ICE SWIM to form your poem. For example:

I thought I’d dare myself,

Can’t feel my toes when I dive in,

Every part of me is cold and numb,

Etc.

You could also come up with a poem using your senses: On my ice swim I touched … (what texture was it), I saw … (was it a good sight), I felt … (how did you feel emotionally), I smelled … , I heard (were you scared of what you heard), I tasted (was it a good taste?) etc. For example:

On my ice swim I touched the icy water with the end of my big toe before I jumped it, it felt so so cold.

On my ice swim I heard my friends jump in first making a huge splash, hearing them shudder made me afraid of how cold it would be.

Etc.

 

Activity 9

Check out some traditional folk dancing from Lapland – what story do you think the dance is trying to tell? Can you do any of the actions, moves and steps?

 

Activity 10

Lapland has an very special Ice Hotel. Each year it is rebuilt out of snow and ice, and in spring it simply melts back into the Torne River. Lapland also has a Snow Castle (see the outside and inside of the castle) which is reconstructed every year in January, when it is coldest and stands until mid-April when it begins to melt.

Act out building a castle or hotel from ice blocks, and then imagine sleeping there! What would you do to keep warm – come up with an exercise routine to generate some warmth!

 

Activity 11

The Lapland coat of arms is quite incredible! Come up with a coat of arms for your own country, or for Purple Patch!

 

Activity 12

There are the same number of reindeer in Lapland as there are people.

Watch a video of reindeer running – try and look and move like a graceful reindeer bobbing in the snow with your tail showing. The imprints that a herd of reindeer leave in the snow when they change direction makes a beautiful pattern – try closing your eyes with a pencil in your hand and allow your hand to move and draw, changing direction like the running reindeer – do this for the duration of this music. Open your eyes to see the pattern you’ve created in the snow (your paper)!

The streets of the capital city of Lapland, Rovaniemi, when viewed from the sky are laid out to look like reindeer antlers! Can you spot it? Draw yourself some reindeer antlers to hold above your head, or print these out to colour in.

Only Sami People can herd reindeer and each reindeer herder has his own marking (like shepherds in the UK), which is engraved on the reindeer so they know who it belongs to. Design your own marking that you would like to put on your own herd of reindeer to show that they were yours to look after. Or, find a shape of something around the house that you like the look of that could be your reindeer marking

 

Activity 13

Lapland is the land of the berries! Because there can be days of complete darkness during the winter months, berries tend to flourish in Lapland. There are your classic berries; blueberries, raspberries and cranberries, as well as some unusual berries, such as lingonberries, cloudberries and crowberries. Luckily, in Lapland you are allowed to pick and eat any berries you find!

Use your imagination and draw what you think lingonberries, cloudberries and crowberries look like from their names alone. What shape, size and colour are they? When you’ve finished, check your drawings against what they look like in real life: Cloudberry, Lingonberry and Crowberries.

Make up your own name for an unusual berry then act out finding, picking and eating your berry…does it grow high up or low down… is it rare or are there loads to pick… what will you collect them in… does it have thorns.. how big is it.. how would you pick them (would you use a huge comb like this Crowberry farmer) … is it really juicy/sour/sweet?

 

Homework for over the Christmas break:

In January we want to put out a big ‘thank you’ to all our Purple People, so over the Christmas break have a think about who you would like to thank for helping you over the course of this tricky year. This is going to link in with our Purple New Years Resolution of kindness and gratitude.

You could design thank you cards or posters for special people, you could do some ‘thank you’ colouring in, you could write a poem, you could create your own page for somebody else to colour in.

Bring them with you to the first session back in the new year (w/c 4th January) for our ‘Adventures in Kindness’ theme!

 

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

Adventures Online

This week’s theme:

Adventures Online

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Fact of the week: Being online can help us to communicate, find information, work, do our hobbies, see our friends, and be entertained.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Activity 1

WWW is short for World Wide Web, which is all the different things you can find online. The internet connects them all, and if we could see all the connections, it might look a bit like a spiders’ web!

Try creating a picture of the world wide web: first create a spiders’ web using string to represent all the connections, then draw and add things that you can find on the web. For example, a recipe for your favourite food, an episode of your favourite TV show, an animal you might want to learn more about…the options are endless!

 

Activity 2:

You can access the internet in some buildings around your community, like libraries, cafes, gyms and hotels. Try searching on an online map to find places near you where you could access the internet outside of your house.

 

Activity 3:

Emails are letters that can be sent and received really quickly over the internet! Think of all the ways you can send a written message to someone who isn’t in the same place as you – in the past, people would send messages on carrier pigeons, or send someone to travel and deliver the message on their behalf. Now, we can write a letter and send it in the post, but it is much quicker to email. Send a letter to someone you know and guess how long it will take to arrive. Find out from the recipient of the letter how long it actually took! Then try sending them an email and see how much quicker it is!

 

Activity 4:

Protecting yourself and your things online is a bit like in real life. Draw a big padlock . Think about what you would keep safe in real life; just like you protect your house keys and your purse or wallet, you also want to protect your address and your bank details! What other things can you think of that you would like to protect? Write everything you would keep safe on the padlock – these are all the things you would protect online!

 

Activity 5:

Passwords protect your information, and act like a key! Random words together, a mixture of CAPITAL LETTERS and lowercase letters, numbers (1234…) and symbols (!”£$@?…) can create a strong password.

Write the numbers 1 to 9 on 9 pieces of paper, and put the following symbols on 5 separate pieces of paper: £ ! @ * & . Lay your pieces of paper face down so you can’t see what is written on them. Next, choose 3 objects in your house. To create your password, turn over 2 number cards and 2 symbol cards, then add them to your 3 random objects. For example: objects = flower, chair, pillow; numbers = 1, 6; symbols = &, * could create the password: *flower6chair&pillow1

 

Activity 6:

There are loads of things you can do online. Try creating an acrostic poem with all the things you might do online, or any thoughts you have about the internet:

B

E

I

N

G

 

O

N

L

I

N

E

 

Activity 7:

Work out the clues to find out some key things involved in being digital!

  1. The animal goes ‘squeak squeak!’, but the computer version goes ‘click click’! M _ _ _ _
  2. On a piano, the k_ _ b _ _ _ _ plays the music, but on a computer, the k _ _ b _ _ _ _ writes the words.
  3. Imagine a spider’s home as big as the earth! W _ _ _ _ Wide W _ _
  4. On a camera, you z _ _ _ in to look more closely, but on the internet, Z _ _ _ helps you say hello to your friends!
  5. You can’t search the internet with slime, but you can with G _ _ gle!

 

Activity 8:

At Purple Patch Arts, we’ve been hosting Zoom Discos every month! Going digital can help you be involved in things you might be missing during social distancing measures. Why not have your own personal disco? Play all your favourite songs and have a dance!

If you’d like to join our discos, please contact bronia@purplepatcharts.org / 07725 041801

 

Activity 9:

Some people express their feelings online with emojis – little pictures that show different emotions or activities, like a smiley face! There are so many emojis now that you can even tell a story with them – can you work out what these famous stories/films/books are?

Fairytales:

  1. 🐷🐷🐷

 

  1. ❄️⚪️😴🤧🤪😃🤓😳😑

 

  1. 👦🏻🌱

 

Films:

  1. 🧝🏻‍♂️💍

 

  1. 🦕🦖⛰

 

  1. 👰👰👰👰⚰️

 

Books:

  1. 👩🏼🐇👑❤️

 

  1. 🦁🧙🚪

 

  1. 💨🍃🌿

 

Try it yourself! Tell a story through little emoji pictures and see if someone else can work out what the story is! You could try it with song titles too.

 

Activity 10:

Zoom is a programme that allows you to talk to multiple people over video – just like our Purple Patch Lifelong Programme groups! Imagine you could have a Zoom meeting with anyone in the world – who would you invite? Draw a square for each person and yourself next to each other and draw everyone in their own little square to show your dream Zoom meeting!

 

Activity 11:

Is there anyone on your dream Zoom that you could invite in real life? Why not host a Zoom dinner party or picnic! Set up your own Zoom meeting and send an invitation to anyone you would like to invite with the Zoom meeting ID and password, as well as the time of your Zoom dinner party. Make sure you know who can come along so you know who to expect on your Zoom meeting. The benefit of having a dinner party over Zoom is that you only have to cook for yourself! Why not try having everyone cooking the same meal so you can all eat the same thing together? Or everyone could dress up in fancy clothes, or fancy dress!

 

Activity 12:

Try creating your own Zoom background! Use collage, paint, or drawing to create whatever scene you like; it could be out in space, on the beach, or just a colourful picture. To make it your Zoom background, take a photo of it and make sure it is saved to your computer. When on your next Zoom meeting, click the little arrow next to the video icon and select ‘choose virtual background’. Click the little ‘+’ next to choose virtual background and it should take you to your saved images to choose your background!

 

Activity 13:

Robots represent the combination of physical and digital technology – technology you can see and technology you can’t. Although there have been a lot of advancements in robot technology, they can still be a bit jerky when they move! Try dancing like the robot – make your movements stop and start and be jerky, try only moving one body part at a time, think about how you might walk around, are you a slow robot or a fast robot?

Here are some electronic songs to dance along to:

Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger – Daft Punk

Computer Love – Kraftwerk

Midnight City – M83

 

Activity 14:

Staying safe online can be a little overwhelming, but there are some great resources to help you feel confident and comfortable:

BBC Own It is aimed at young people but has loads of videos, activities, and advice to help anyone feel safe and confident online.

Learn My Way goes right back to basics to help build your confidence in all things digital!

BT Skills for Tomorrow has a bit of everything – from guides on internet shopping, to video call tips for absolute beginners.

 

Activity 15:

These days, lots of music is created using digital programmes, not just with instruments.

Chrome Music Lab lets you try out lots of experiments to create music!

In Song Maker you can create a picture on the grid and see how it sounds musically. Similarly, you can draw pictures in Kandinsky to create music.

In Rhythm you can control how the animals play the drums and percussion instruments.

In Spectogram you can watch the rainbow colours of frequencies that are created by different instruments.

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures in sci-fi

This week’s theme:

Adventures in sci-fi

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Doctor Who has had so many adventures for us to explore that we’ve had to make this topic into a 2-week spectacular so that we can fit it all in! Feel free to use any of the below activities to span over 2 weeks.

 

Fact of the fortnight: The 23rd of November is Doctor Who Day (also known as “Tardis Day”), celebrating the day that Dr Who was first broadcasted on TV in 1963.

 

Activities for the fortnight…

 

Activity 1:

Science fiction (sometimes shortened to sci-fi or SF) is a genre of fiction that deals with imaginative and futuristic ideas such as deep space exploration and time travel. One popular Sci-fi TV series is Doctor Who.

The first Doctor Who episode was on Saturday 23rd November, 1963. Since then, there have been 12 ‘regenerations’ of the Doctor, meaning 13 actors have played the character – here is the most recent Doctor.

Imagine you are the Doctor – how might you act? You have time travelled and been all over space, and you are over 900 years old and you have two hearts! You could dress up in your own ‘Doctor’ outfit – make sure it’s something you can fight aliens in! There’s also some good hats in Doctor Who. And good neckwear too – pose as Tom Baker as Doctor Who in a long scarf or as Doctor Who/Matt Smith with a bow tie.

 

Activity 2:

The universe is filled with many wonders… but also many dangerous alien races! The Doctor has faced countless creatures, take a look at some of these famous Doctor Who villains, creatures and monsters: Cybermen, Daleks, Weeping Angels, Abzorbaloff, Ood, Adipose, and even the Christmas trees can be dangerous on Doctor Who!

Can you do any impressions or act like all of these creatures? Try saying a tongue twister in your best Dalek voice! Try a whisk for a Dalek antennae!

Create your own Doctor Who monster: you could either draw it, model it, or dress up as it yourself! See if you can answer these questions about your monster:

  • Are you a friend (good) or a foe (evil)?
  • What is your special power?
  • What planet are you from?

 

Activity 3:

The Tardis is Doctor Who’s time machine – it stands for: Time And Relative Dimensions In Space. The Tardis is bigger on the inside than on the outside and it looks like a blue police box! Try making your own mini Tardis or decorate a box in your recycling to look like the Tardis.

The opening credits to the TV show feature lots of swirls and outer space imagery. Create the swooshes with your body, or your fingers in space. Draw or paint a backdrop for your Tardis to whoosh past. You could create space imagery by dropping salt onto a still wet painted picture, using a straw to blow wet paint around your page, or use cotton buds to add star drops to your art.

 

Activity 4:

Pretend you are in the Tardis whooshing at speed through space and time while the Doctor Who theme tune plays – remember, it can be quite a bumpy ride, so hold on tight!

The Tardis travels through time (forwards and backwards) to different eras, and it also travels through space, visiting different places in the world and in the universe. Play the theme tune and every time the tune is paused, creak open the door of the Tardis and see where in space and time you’ve travelled to. How would you greet, or what action could you do, for each different place/times you opened the door to?

Some ideas: Doctor Who has visited Victorian London, Victorian Cardiff, Pompei when the volcano erupted, New York, the South Pole, Lake Silencio in Utah. The doctor has travelled back in time to meet artist Vincent Van Gogh, writer William Shakespeare, activist Rosa Parks, Robin Hood, Charles Dickens, and travelled to the 13th Century England to  greet King John.

Perform the theme tune using body percussion, whistling, and homemade instruments.

 

Activity 5:

Doctor Who’s ‘Sonic Screwdriver’ is a very useful tool that can do many things!

Make your own sonic screwdriver by covering a pencil in tin foil. Imagine uses (real, or sci-fi) for your sonic screwdriver. This isn’t just a screwdriver, it … turns aliens pink, makes people bald, cures disease, makes plants grow, makes you talk gibberish, etc. Act out the magical uses.

 

Activity 6:

The 10th Doctor wrote ‘A Journal of Impossible Things’ – a journal of his strange dreams (in reality, the book was comprised of events he’d experienced as the Doctor). River Song (the wife of the Doctor) also kept a diary of her adventures with the Doctor. Write an adventure journal of impossible things. What strange imaginary people and worlds could you capture in your journal – in words or pictures?

Come up with some River Songs, or river sound effects.

Or listen to river sounds and think about the sounds, colours and shapes you might see at the riverside.

Using a piece of cloth such as a scarf, tea towel of pillow case, create a dance to this or this river music. Gently make your scarves rise and fall, like a river slowly swelling with water.

 

Activity 7:

Gallifrey was the home world of the Time Lords. The Time Lords used Gallifreyan language and there were several forms of written Gallifreyan. Circular Gallifreyan can be written using interlocking circles, dots, hexagons and lines. For example, the words ‘Purple Patch Arts’ written in Circular Gallifreyan look like this!! Try your own name here.

Try making your own mysterious language patterns on paper using circles, lines, dots and hexagons. How many sides does a hexagon have? What different objects can you find to make circles and dots with – what circular things can you draw around, what circular things can you dip in paint to make shapes with? Can you use the edge of a box dipped in paint to make straight lines?

Apparently the circles are read anti-clockwise. Try doing or saying things backwards, or moving backwards/anti-clockwise.

When spoken, Old High Gallifreyan sounded musical to human ears. Try speaking in a musical way – can you make a sing-song voice – stretching out certain words, connecting words together, going up and down in a pattern. Can you speak with a high pitched and deep pitched voice. Can you make words hit certain notes. Can your mimic different instruments?

Try different tempos – can you talk slowly, and then as fast as a chipmunk; on YouTube in the settings (the cog within the video) you can mess with ‘playback settings’ to speed up/slow down a song to listen to and sing along with – try it with ‘Dancing Queen’, how odd does it sound at different speeds!

 

Activity 8:

Come up with a dance routine to this 80s classic from The Timelords.

 

Activity 9:

There have been lots of logos for Doctor Who over the years – try designing a new one!

 

Activity 10:

Rewrite a famous story as a sci-fi story! Here are some ideas:

Cinderella – what if the Prince’s ball was on the moon?

Snow White and the Seven Dwarves – what if everyone was a robot?

Goldilocks and the Three Bears – what if the bears were aliens?

Jack and the Beanstalk – What if the beanstalk took Jack to another planet?

You could tell your story as a comic strip on the whiteboard, or act it out in your group.

 

Activity 11:

Is all of this Science Fiction, or Science fact? Take a look at some of these real life news articles about the possibility of life in space, all very recent!

Alien Life on Venus? UFO sightings in Lincolnshire, Are Aliens Trying to Talk to Us?

Imagine an alien came to Earth – what are the most important things you would tell them? What film or television show would you show to an alien to best represent life as a human? What human things would you teach them to do? What advice do you have for them?

Try a science fact/science fiction quiz or come up with your own fact or fiction quiz!

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures on a train – ‘Murder’ on The Orient Express

This week’s theme:

Adventures on a train – ‘Murder’ on The Orient Express

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Fact of the week: Hercule Poirot solved his most famous case on it, Alfred Hitchock’s lady vanished from it and James Bond rode it from Istanbul to London. The Orient Express is full of mystery.

 

Activity 1:

Agatha Christie’s book ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ was first published in January 1934, and features her popular character, the detective Hercule Poirot. Poirot was known for his moustache. Dress yourself up as a detective – draw a waxed moustache to wear! Make some detective props – draw magnifying glasses to hunt for fingerprints.

What’s your Detective name – try out this name generator.

 

Activity 2:

Dress up as suspicious Cluedo style characters/suspect using the props and costume bits found at home.

What will your character be called/what will they do for a living? How will they act – what characteristics do you need to make sure you’re not detected? Do you need to be jumpy and suspicious looking, eager to talk and give away clues and secrets? Or will you be cool, calm, collected and a bit aloof or defensive, perhaps tells fibs to cover their back/conceal their real identity, or in cahoots with other suspects?

For inspiration, in Cluedo the characters are: Mrs. White, Mr. Green, Mrs. Peacock, Professor Plum, Miss Scarlet, and Colonel Mustard.

In ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ the suspects are: M. Bouc (police officer), Dr. Constantine (Doctor), Mary Debenham (governess), Mrs. Hubbard (famous actress), Colonel Arbuthnot (Colonel), Princess Dragomiroff (a Russian princess), Hector McQueen (secretary), Countess Andrenyi (Countess), Count Andrenyi (Count), Cyrus Hardman (American detective), Antonio Foscanelli (Italian chauffer), Greta Ohlsson (Swedish nurse), Hildegarde Schmidt (the Princesses maid), Edward Henry Masterman (personal attendant), Pierre Michel (servant).

 

Activity 3:

Use a mystery plot generator to come up with a mysterious story plot.

Or, come up with a title for a mystery story (some ideas: ‘The adventure of…’ ‘The disappearance of…’ ‘The strange tale of…’ ‘The case of…’ ‘A Full Account of…’ ‘A scandal in…’ ‘The man with the…’, also useful are the adjectives ‘curious’ and ‘remarkable’). you could use a detective book name generator and base your story around that.

Or, simply come up with your mystery story of your very own.

Act out your story, you could play all of the parts.

 

Activity 4:

There has been a long-running television show following the detective work of Agatha Christie’s Poirot. Here is the theme tune – can you come up with some detective themed dance moves to go with it? Here are some ideas: tip-toeing around so no one can hear you, looking at objects through a magnifying glass for clues, writing in a notebook, having an ‘aha!’ moment…

 

Activity 5:

Draw the suspect from this description given to Poirot at the scene:

A person taller than a table but smaller than a door. With a beard that isn’t white. With a scar on their face in the shape of a country. Wearing unusual clothes. Hair concealed under a hat.

Sometimes descriptions given to detectives are vague, meaning we can all have our own unique interpretations of what something looks like. What details would have been important for you to know when drawing your picture so that it could have been more accurate? How would you better describe the person you’ve drawn to detectives?

 

Activity 6:

Someone had given the police a report of a suspicious incident. The report was written on different cards from start to finish but a clumsy inspector dropped them and jumbled them up. What order did the events happen in? Can you also come up with actions for each part of the story?

1: I gave a description of the person I had seen running away.

2: I ran to where I heard the noise coming from and saw a cloaked person dashing away down the train carriage

3: The suspect was caught in the buffet carriage, pockets stuffed with jewels.

4: I found a woman crying, her jewels had been stolen.

5: Poirot investigated the theft.

6: I heard a scream.

 

Activity 7:

You need to get a message to Poirot with clues about the incident, but you don’t want anybody to know you’re sharing information in case it gets into the wrong hands.

Come up for some code words for objects to confuse the enemy. Is a cup now called a sip-ser, a book a paper-flutterer, etc.

Try communicating without speaking using your body language and facial expressions. Can you tell someone how you feel without speaking?

Learn some signs or Makaton that the enemy might not be able to understand.

Try drawing pictures to represent what you want to say.

 

Activity 8:

In the story, the train is forced to stop due to heavy snowfall – this actually happened to the real Orient Express, in 1929, when the train had to stop for 6 days! Imagine you were stuck on the Orient Express for 6 days, what would you do? Write or draw a diary for each day.

 

Activity 9:

Agatha Christie wrote her first book because her sister dared her to! So, we dare you to do something new this week – learn a train fact, research and draw a train, make a comic book, a poem, a play, a song, a written story… try something new!

 

(Answer for Activity 6: The order is 6, 2, 4, 1, 5, 3.)

  

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures on a train – The Orient Express

This week’s theme:

Adventures on a train – The Orient Express

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Fact of the week: The Orient Express was a luxury long-distance passenger train service created in 1883.

 

Activity 1:

Listen to some snippets of train songs – spot the rhythms and patterns, train sounds, clicks, clacks, choos, and ‘all aboard’s in the music that mimics the sounds of train travel: Dolly’s ‘Blue smoke’ (perfect train song!), Marrakesh ExpressJonny CashLocomotionAll Aboard, Boogie Woogie Choo Choo Train, Orient Express.

Create the movement, rhythm, motion and action of the music with your bodies. Create these rhythm sounds with instruments or body percussion.

Try learning the dance moves to ‘The Locomotion’.

 

Activity 2:

The Orient Express is a high-class, luxury train with luxurious sleeping and dining carts, and people to attend to your every want, if you have enough money to travel on it!

Create a luxury train soundscape – your sounds (and accompanying actions) could include:

  • The ‘click clack’ of the train on the track/The ‘whoooosh’ of the steam/The ‘choo choo’ of the train horn
  • The ‘tickets please’ of the conductor/the ‘can I help?’/’let me take that for you’ of the baggage handlers, the ‘would you like ice with that?’ of the waiters.
  • You could use knives and forks against plates to create the sound of the dining cart.
  • Or snores to create the sound of the sleeping cart!
  • Pianist in the entertainment area.

 

Activity 3:

The Orient Express first travelled in 1883. The Orient Express was a showcase of luxury and comfort at a time when travelling was still rough and dangerous.

Make yourself a luxuriously comfortable train seat to travel on – you’re going to need lots of padding, cushions, and with everything you need close at hand.

 

If we’re travelling on a luxury train with high class passengers we’d better brush up on our deportment (the way a person stands and walks), poise (grace and elegance), elocution (clear and expressive speech), good manners, and etiquette (polite behaviour). We don’t want to get kicked off the train for being rude!

Practice your deportment by seeing how far you can travel while sitting/standing up tall and balancing a book or cushion on your head. Can you make it around the room? Can you curtsy and still balance the book?

Practice moving gracefully like a ballet dancer, try to be light and elegant!

Try some elocution techniques with some tongue twisters such as this one. Can you write some tongue twisters of your own?

Practice drinking gracefully with your pinkie out.

 

Activity 4:

The train’s first journey was in 1883, and it travelled from Paris to Constantinople (now called Istanbul), covering 3,959 miles in 13 days!

Design your dream train journey – where would you start, end, where would you stop on the way? Draw your new journey on a map.

 

Activity 5:

Paris is the capital of France, and Istanbul is a major city in Turkey.

Try speaking some French (there are some basics from 3 mins in here) and Turkish words.

Try some Turkish dance moves maybe dancing to this song.

With your body, or with your finger in the air, try making some of the shapes in Parisian buildings and scenery such as the Sacre Coeur or Eiffel Tower and the shapes from Istanbul such as those at the Hagia Sophia at Sultanahmet Square.

 

Activity 6:

20th May, 1977 was the final Orient Express journey from Paris to Istanbul (leaving Paris and stopping at Lausanne – Simplon – Milan – Venice – Belgrade – Sofia – before arriving in Istanbul). Design your own poster to advertise its final trip.

 

Activity 7:

Write a poem about the train’s journey – it could be an acrostic of ORIENT EXPRESS. Think about what you might see outside, what sounds you might hear, and what you might taste or smell or feel on the train. For example:

On the train, whooshing through Europe

Rain on the windows

Interesting passengers

Eating fancy food

Nice and comfy

Turkey is our destination

etc

 

Activity 8:

It is said that over the years more than 1.1 million dinners have been served on the Orient Express which comes to almost 4 million courses!

The first menu on the Orient Express (on October 10, 1882) included: oysters, soup with Italian pasta, turbot with green sauce, chicken ‘à la chasseur’, fillet of beef with ‘château’ potatoes, ‘chaud-froid’ (hot cold) of game animals, lettuce, chocolate pudding, and a buffet of desserts.

Create your own luxurious menu for the Orient Express of things you’ve always wanted to eat – what fancy, expensive food and drink would you include – Caviar? A 20 tier cake? Golden champagne? Illustrate your menu so it’s fit for a queen!

Act out what it would be like to dine at such a lavish and fancy feast on board a moving train – can you keep your champagne from going bump?

 

Activity 9:

Aboard the train were luxury dining items, such as this specially designed silver Orient Express teapot. Design and decorate your own train-themed teapots.

 

Activity 10:

The Orient Express has a golden crest that acts as its logo or badge. What would be on the crest of your train? Design and draw a fancy logo.

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventurous News – This Week in History

This week’s theme:

Adventurous news – This week in history

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Fact of the week: The beginning of November was a very busy week in history with lots of important events happening – spooky songs released, energetic sports invented, explorers exploring, pharaohs being discovered, polar expeditions happening, and gunpowder plots being discovered.

 

Activity 1:

On 2nd November 1983 Michael Jackson’s Thriller was released. The single has since sold over 9 million copies worldwide and is one of the biggest selling singles of all time. The music video is also famous, and was the first music video to inducted into the National Film Registry. Thriller has also become a Halloween anthem, and has a famous zombie dance!

Try learning some of the Thriller dance moves, or just dance like a zombie!

Or come up with actions for the different lyrics, and make instruments to play in time to the beats.

 

Activity 2:

On 2nd November 1898 the first organised cheerleading happened in the United States. Cheerleading began as an organised group cheering on their sports team, but has since developed to become a form of entertainment in itself and there are now cheerleading competitions.

Try out some of these cheerleading chants, then make up some of your own!

Eagle pride! Eagle pride!
Our team’s the best,
Let’s show our pride!

Give me a B! Give me an E!
Give me an S! Give me a T!
What’s that spell? Best! Best!
Put us to the test!
We’ll beat the Hornets!
We won’t give ’em a rest!

S-P-I-R-I-T, spirit!
Hey, let us hear it!
Gonna high gear it!
‘Cause we’ve got spirit!

Cheerleaders: When we say Lions, you say Go!
Cheerleaders: Lions
Crowd: Go!
Cheerleaders: Lions!
Crowd: Go!
Everyone: Gooo Lions!

Tape together long strips of tissue paper, or crepe paper, or plastic bags into your own DIY cheerleading Pom Poms to shake while trying out some of these Cheerleading shapes.

 

Activity 3:

On 3rd November 1493 – Christopher Columbus became the first European person to see the island of Dominica. The island was already inhabited by the native Kalinago people.

Here is the path his boat took on the second voyage after sailing from Spain, and here is the routes of all 4 voyages.  . See if you can find Dominica on a map. Tip: you might need to zoom in as it is pretty small!

Try making a boat to sail across the seas to new lands!

What jobs and actions might you have to do on board the ship? How will you spot new lands?

Do you know any sailing songs? Try the Makaton signs to ‘Sailing’.

Once you have discovered new land, you can mark it with a flag! You could choose a country’s flag or design your own. Once you have drawn out and coloured in your flag, try attaching it to wooden stick so you can wave your flag around or stick it into the ground.

 

Activity 4:

On 4th October 1922 Tutankhamun’s tomb was discovered by Howard Carter. Tutankhamun was a pharaoh (an Ancient Egyptian ruler) and his tomb was filled with incredibly valuable items to show his wealth as a pharaoh – his ‘death mask’ is particularly famous for being an incredible work of art.

Gold was a very important material and colour to Pharaohs. It was used a lot in their art, tombs, rituals and costumes. Tutankhamun’s mask was of pure solid gold which had been beautifully beaten and polished, and the body was decorated with over one hundred and forty pieces of jewellery.

Try making some metallic art work of your own using tin foil: Draw a design; it could be an Egyptian pattern like The Eye of Horus or another pattern, or your own drawing onto paper; then place a piece of foil under your paper (resting on a soft book, polystyrene plate or soft cardboard would work best), trace over your design with a ball point pen (pressing hard) to transfer the image onto the foil. Flip the foil over so that the raised side is the front! (You could use coloured Sharpies or biros to colour the foil too.)

Alternatively, you could cut out a cardboard shape and glue it to a piece of card, cover this with a glued sheet of foil and gently rub over the shape to create a relief of your shape. This again could be coloured with biros and patterns imprinted with the pressure of the pen.

To get even fancier, you could use PVA glue which when dried creates a relief to cover with foil. See here  for instructions.

 

Tutankhamun had 5,398 different objects buried with him to ensure that he remained strong, wealthy, and well fed in the afterlife. These objects included a leopard-skin cloak, four game boards, six chariots, 30 wine jars, and 46 bows. Draw a picture of your most favourite precious things that you always like to pack with you wherever you go?

 

Activity 5:

On 4th November 1929 Richard E. Byrd, Laurence McKinley Gould and their polar expedition team began a 2.5 month, 1,500 mile dog-sledge journey into the Queen Maud Mountains. This was the first exploration of the interior of Antarctica.

Imagine being in Antarctica for 2.5 months. What would you need to pack? How would you keep warm? What exercises can you do to warm yourself up?

Learn some sledding commands, and actions to go with them. Have a game of musical statues, except when the song (e.g. Hounds of Love, Dog Days are Over, Who Let the Dogs Out) stops, shout a command, and do that action.

Gee — Command for right turn.

Haw — Command for left turn.

Come gee! Come haw! — Command for 180-degree turns in either direction.

Mush! Let’s go! All right! Hike! — Various commands to get the dog team going.

Whoa! — Command used to halt the team.

 

Look at Daily Activity 52 for activities about the polar regions and climate change.

 

Activity 6:

On 5th November 1605 Guy Fawkes’ plot to blow up British Parliament was discovered and he was stopped.

Look at the famous Nursery Rhyme about Guy Fawkes. It’s pretty horrid, so maybe just focus on the first paragraph below! Can you turn the poem into a song, can you play any instruments in time with your new song, or come up with different actions for each line? You could add in some of your own sound effects such as crackling fire, popping firework, and gunpowder bang sound effects.

‘Remember, remember the fifth of November,

Gunpowder treason and plot.

We see no reason

Why gunpowder treason

Should ever be forgot!’

 

Can you come up with a play that acts out the rules for how to stay safe on Bonfire night?

Can you make the shapes with your body that different fireworks make in the sky? Come up with a choreographed routine to show off all the different shapes and have a fireworks display of your own. Can you do your display in time to music (watch this fireworks display in time to The Greatest Showman for inspiration)

Create some firework paintings using a kitchen roll tube with slits cut into it.

 

Activity 7:

Keeping track of what’s in the news is important so that we feel informed and know more about what’s going on in the world. Take time this week to see if there’s anything in the news that you hear about that you think is interesting, funny, positive, or worth sharing. You could draw the news story.

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventurous People – David Attenborough and Jane Goodall

This week’s theme:

Adventurous People – David Attenborough and Jane Goodall

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

David Attenborough and Jane Goodall are such fascinating people that we’ve made this topic into a 2-week spectacular. Feel free to use any of the below activities to span over 2 weeks.

 

Activities for the fortnight…

 

Fact of the fortnight: David Attenborough and Jane Goodall have both educated the public on the world of animals and our natural environment.

 

Activity 1:

Sir David Attenborough (born in 1926, making him an amazing 94 years old) is a TV and radio broadcaster and natural historian. Natural Historians study and observe animals, fungi, and plants in their natural environment. David is best known for writing and presenting natural history documentaries.

Watch this video for a very catchy song about David Attenborough that explains a bit about him and what he does. How many different animals, plants, and environments can you spot in the video? Try drawing as many as you can, or making cardboard puppets of them like in the video.

 

Activity 2:

Jane Goodall is a primatologist which means that she studies primates. Primates range in size from Madame Berthe’s mouse lemur, which is tiny and weighs 30g (about the weight of 30 paperclips), to the huge eastern gorilla, weighing over 200kg (more than 2 large men).

How many different primates do you know? How many can you spot in this picture or in this quiz?

 

Activity 3:

David Attenborough is famous for his narration of nature documentaries, such as ‘Our Planet’ on the BBC. Here is a clip from ‘Our Planet’, where David Attenborough talks about Narwhals.

Find a video clip of animals that you love and see if you can narrate it like David Attenborough. You could look up some facts to add to your narration. Here are some more examples from ‘Our Planet’ and ‘Planet Earth’ that you can mute and have a go at narrating: Otters. Cheetahs. Birds of Paradise. Humpback Whales. Polar Bears. Snow Leopard.

 

Activity 4:

You could try narrating anything like David Attenborough. All you need is a slow, calm and reassuring voice to give a voice-over to anything at all. He’s had a go at narrating Adele’s music video, could you have a go at describing or narrating a video, or TV show on mute, or even what you can see you neighbours doing from your window.

 

Activity 5:

David Attenborough has several species (both living and extinct) named after him, such as a soil snail (Palaina attenboroughi), a bird (Polioptila attenboroughi), a millimetre-long goblin spider (Prethopalpus attenboroughi) and a species of Ecuadorian flowering tree (Blakea attenboroughi). Imagine you have discovered a new animal or plant – you could name it after yourself! Draw your plant or animal, give it a name, and label all of its features! Once you know what it is, what it looks like, where it’s found, what it eats, what its family structure is like, could you narrate a short description of it?

 

Activity 6:

Jane Goodall famously went on a research trip to the forest of Gombe (Tanzania) in 1960 that changed how we understand chimpanzees forever! Chimpanzees are very similar to humans, and Jane Goodall discovered that they all have different personalities and they even make and use tools just like humans. Watch these 2 videos about Jane Goodall’s life and work: here and here.

Act out some of Jane’s observations… Can you mimic the greeting call of a chimp. Try moving like a chimp using your whole body. Can you act shy, aggressive, or mischievous. Act out different emotions that chimps share with us – happiness, sadness, fear. Can you practice making instrument noises that change from loud to quiet to loud like chimp calls.

 

Activity 7:

Jane’s research tent was full of objects and African sounds. Look at the reconstruction of it here. What useful objects can you spot and how do you think they’d be used? What other objects would you take on a trip to Tanzania to study chimps?

 

Activity 8:

Jane Goodall has an initiative called ‘Roots and Shoots’, whose mission is ‘to empower young people to affect positive change in their communities’. They have ‘1-click actions’ – easy things anyone can do to help make the world a better place!

Why not try this 1-click action? Write a positive letter or card for someone in your life – it could be a friend, a family member, a neighbour. Sending positivity, kindness and support will make them and you feel good! You could hand deliver your letter, or send it in the post.

 

Activity 9:

David Attenborough and Jane Goodall are both activists – they work to educate people about the natural world and how we can help save environments and the animals that live in them. David Attenborough’s documentaries are an example of him using art to educate others, by using filmmaking to show the effects of climate change.

Think of something you would like to be an activist of – something you would like to educate people about to inspire positive change. Now choose an artistic way of spreading your message. You could write a song or a poem, do a painting or drawing, write a story, or make a film like David Attenborough!

 

Activity 10:

Jane Goodall is a Dr, and she wrote her Doctoral thesis on ‘Behaviour of free-living chimpanzees’, which means she did research into chimpanzees that had never been done before! Find a fact about chimpanzees that you don’t think anyone else will know and make a poster telling everyone about it.

 

Activity 11:

Jane Goodall worked with monkeys, a famous fictional monkey is King Louie from the Jungle Book! Listen to his song ‘I wanna be like you’ and learn the chorus to sing along, and develop a dance routine for it! Make big band instruments to play along: Trumpet, Drums, Guitar, Microphone.

 

Activity 12:

Create a scene based on David Attenborough’s ‘What a Wonderful World’. Choose what natural world scenes you could act out – swarms of fish in the ocean, flowers blooming, a lion hunting, meerkats peeking, polar bears walking, etc. Learn some of the lyrics from the song to sing along as you’re acting out the animal scenes. You could even put together some animal costumes or masks to wear.

 

Activity 13:

Jane learned of the plight facing wild chimpanzees all across Africa—they were disappearing. The four main threats to chimpanzees in the wild are loss of their habitat (where they live), disease, hunting, and people illegally moving them from their habitat.

Choose an endangered animal from this list (warning, it makes for depressing reading). Learn one or two things about them/their movement/their habitat, and come up with a play or poem or song about saving your chosen endangered species. Or, make a ‘save our [endangered species]’ placards for a purple protest, or a chant.

 

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures through an Underwater Museum

This week’s theme:

Adventures through an underwater museum

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Fact of the week: Under the ocean, accessible only to divers and snorkelers are museums full of sculptures, sunken cities, shipwrecks and film props.

 

Activity 1:

This week we’re adventuring to underwater museums so we’ll need some diving goggles – look in your recycling pile to find an empty clear fruit punnet that you can use as a diving mask. You could use some elastic, or ribbon to tie to around your head, or just hold it in place. You could grab a drinking straw to act as a snorkel tube too if you’d like.

Act out the action of putting on your diving gear – your mask, your fins/flippers, your wetsuit, and your oxygen tank, your gloves and boots, and your wrist compass. There’s a lot to carry on our bodies – does it feel light or heavy?

We’re going to dive deep into the sea – practice the actions of holding your breath to dive in, diving off the side of the boat, swimming, breathing slowly and calmly through a snorkel, un-steaming your mask by wiping it, flapping your flippers/fins.

What sound will you make when you first dive in? If you have a bucket of water to hand, recreate some diving sounds and splashes. What swimming sounds can you make in the water? Can you make any bubbling sounds like the sound from a snorkel?

 

Activity 2:

As we dive down to the underwater galleries and museums on the sea bed we might hear the sound of the SCUBA breathing gear we’re wearing close your eyes and listen to the underwater sounds, concentrating on your own relaxed breathing. This can be a calm, mindful moment to think about what other sounds you might hear while you’re underwater, and what stressful sounds you won’t hear down there since you’ve left them at the surface. Listen to the sounds for as long as you like.

 

Activity 3:

As we travel to the sea bed we might pass through some seaweed. If you have scraps of fabric, string, wool, shoelaces, clingfilm, tissue paper, loosely tie them dangling from your fingers. Move your fingers and touch it around to feel the sensation of seaweed tangling and passing around different parts of your body.

 

Activity 4:

Take a look at these underwater museums and galleries around the world:

The Museo Atlántico in Lanzarote

Christ of the abyss in Italy and in Key Largo, Florida.

Molinere Underwater Sculpture Park in Grenada is a collection of underwater contemporary art.

The underwater ‘Nest’ sculptures  in Indonesia provides a home for soft corals and sponges, which in turn will encourage other marine life. This paves the way for delicate hard corals and eventually a fully established reef will form in, on, and around the artefacts.

M.U.S.A. (Museo Subacuático de Arte) in Mexico is one of the largest underwater art museums in the world, it features over 500 life-size sculptures.

Try and create the poses and shapes of some of the underwater artefacts. Imagine diving and swimming amongst them.

One of the statues in the underwater museum in Grenada appears to be using a typewriter or keyboard underwater. Imagine writing a letter home from the bottom of the sea, and trying to explain everything you’ve seen in these underwater museums. What would your letter say? What adjectives would you use?

 

Activity 5:

Make your own 3D sculpture from any material. Cardboard, paper, clay, recycling, wire, straws, tinfoil, playdoh, pipe cleaners. What will your sculpture be of?

Make a sculpture that could be submerged. Think about what materials are waterproof, and how you would keep them at the bottom of your water.

 

Activity 6:

The ancient sunken city of Baia has been turned into an underwater archaeological museum. The city of Baia was abandoned in the 8th century and then submerged underwater. Today it can best be explored by snorkelers and divers. The city was once a lavish seaside resort for rich Romans and emperors. Historians today compare it to Las Vegas or Beverly Hills. Underwater you can still visit the marble sculptures and touch the mosaic floors.

Design a holiday brochure for an underwater seaside resort.

Design some underwater mosaic floors using tessellated shapes.

 

Activity 7:

Underwater sculptures and artefacts are good for marine life as they provide a habitat for coral, sponges, limpets, barnacles, seaweed, and fish, amongst other species.

Play a game of musical limpets. While the music plays, swim or float about, or move like a limpet or barnacle, protected in a shell. When the music stops and the tide goes out, either hide in your shell, sucker to/cling to something close by, or freeze still.

 

Activity 8:

Some underwater museums only become visible at during high or low sea tides.

‘Another Place’ is a collection of 100 statues situated along the beach at Crosby, UK, based on the body of artist Sir Anthony Gormley. Some of the iron men stand proud, where others are up to their waist in sand. The statues are always changing; depending on the fall of the land, the ebb or flow of the tide, the weather conditions and the time of day the work will be more or less visible. At high water, the sculptures that are completely visible when the tide is out will be standing up to their necks in water.

Use your waterproof sculpture from Activity 5 and place it in a washing up bowl, or plastic tub, towards one side. Rock water away from the statue to signify low tide, when the water is far out at sea. Then slowly tip the water closer and closer to your statue as if the tide were coming in. When the high tide hits your sculpture, see what it looks like  partially submerged, water creeping up it until it’s fully submerged. Slowly rock the water away again to re-enact the tides ebbing out again. Around the UK, there are mostly two high tides and two low tides each day, so any sculptures on a beach would appear and disappear under water twice a day.

 

Activity 9:

Some underwater museums can be viewed better when there’s changes in the rise or fall of river levels. When there has been more rain river levels rise as there is more water in them. When there is less rain, river levels fall.

‘Alluvia’ is an underwater statue in The River Stour, Canterbury, England. How clearly it can be seen depends on how deep the water is, and how much silt has been left by the rise and fall of the river’s water levels.

In the Thames in London there was a sculpture of horses that were revealed and then partially concealed by the rise and fall of the Thames river.

Using a piece of cloth such as a scarf, tea towel of pillow case, create a dance to this or this music. Gently make your scarves rise and fall, like a river slowly swelling with water.

 

Activity 10:

In this video you can see somebody Scuba diving with the Moai statue at Easter Island. The statue was used in Kevin Costner’s movie “Rapa Nui” and has since been placed there, underwater, as a site for people to dive at.

Imagine an underwater museum of props from films. What props from films do you think would make interesting underwater artefacts for people to visit? Would you dive to view the clock face from Back to The Future? Or swim around the tower from Tangled? Or snorkel alongside the Stay Puft Marshmallow man from Ghostbusters?

Draw some of your favourite film props and objects in an underwater scene.

 

Activity 11:

In Florida there’s an underwater museum of statues to honour military veterans. The Circle of Heroes features 12 life-sized statues of soldiers from all branches of the military.

Practice some military poses – for Sailors, Soldiers, Pilots, and Army Nurse, etc.

Stand to attention when somebody stops the watery-music stops, and make underwater dance moves while the music is playing.

 

Activity 12:

Read or ask somebody to read to you this Scuba diver poem. Add some actions and sounds. Add a verse about underwater museums and what you’ve seen there today.

Underwater communication is important & hand signals are the primary way divers communicate with each other. Try some Scuba hand signals (see this video for more). There’s also Scuba hand signals for marine animals – are any of these similar to the Makaton signs?

 

Activity 13:

There are also underwater museums featuring long lost underwater cities and shipwrecks

Herod’s Harbor was a city that once served as a trade port for the Roman Empire, it now lies 20 feet below sea level off the coast of Israel. Snorkelers and divers can examine such artifacts as marble columns, anchors, and shipwrecks.

Beneath the waters of the Black Sea near Crimea there’s a collection of thousands of discarded and unwanted busts and figures that once appeared on the streets of Russia.

Off the coast of Roatan, Honduras, snorkelers can spot authentic antiques, including 17th-century sundials, Spanish galleon ships and Mayan-era monuments.

Draw a ‘treasure’ map of an ocean, what hidden artefacts, lost cities, and shipwrecks are under the surface of the water on your maps?

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures Through a Museum

This week’s theme:

Adventures through a museum

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Fact of the week: A museum is a place that stores and cares for a collection of artefacts and other objects of artistic, cultural, historical, or scientific importance. Many public museums make these items available for public viewing through exhibits.

 

Activity 1:

The first thing many people do when they arrive at a museum is pick up a map to work out how best to adventure through the space without missing anything. Make map for a Purple Patch museum – what departments might be in the museum – is it a natural history museum, a science and technology museum, a historical museum, a costume museum, a museum of childhood, a maritime museum, a railway museum, an armouries museum, etc. Which different museums have you been to – what can you remember seeing there – you could note some of the specific artefacts on the map.

For example, the National Museum of Scotland’s map has areas for ‘Animal Kingdom’, ‘Discovery’, Kingdom of the Scots’, etc. The Natural History Museum’s map shows sections to find out about ‘Volcanoes’, ‘Mammals’ and ‘Earth’s Treasures’.

 

Activity 2:

Imagine we’re spending a night at the museum where there’s no other visitors, and everything is quiet and dark. Grab a torch (real, or imaginary), and look high and low around the empty museum. How will you move through the museum. What shadows will the exhibits cast on the walls with your torches? What went bump behind you?

In the TV show ‘One Night at The Museum’, children get to explore a museum at after hours without any adults or museum professionals to guide them, or to tell them exactly what all the exhibits are – it means that the visitors get to imagine for themselves what artefacts are and how they might have been used. Use your imagination and play a game of ‘this is not a pen’ – for example, this is not a pen it’s a medieval tool for getting wax out of the ear; this is not a pen it’s the tooth of a sabre tooth tiger; this is not a pen it’s a Viking arrow, etc.

Some museums allow special sleepovers where you can bring a sleeping bag and camp out with the dinosaurs or whales or big cats over night. Which exhibits or animals would, and wouldn’t you like to go to sleep next to? Act out what it would feel like waking up next to a shark/bear/dinosaur/Viking/Elizabethan queen.

Will any exhibits come to life at night like in the adventure film, ‘A Night At The Museum’ Draw or act out what exhibits you’d like to see come to life.

 

Activity 3:

Grab your torch and let’s head to the Medieval section of the museum. Dr Alice Blackwell, a curator at the National Museum of Scotland has discovered that many medieval artefacts in the collection at the museum share patterns with the designs found on kitchen roll! See here. What patterns can you find on your kitchen roll at home? Can you copy and draw any of the medieval patterns that are in Dr Alice’s kitchen roll? Or draw them with your finger, arm, and nose in the air?

 

Activity 4:

Let’s head to the Natural History’ section of the museum…

One of the objects shown in the first ever public museum collection was a stuffed Dodo – and the remains of this specimen is still on display today!

Try drawing what you imagine the Dodo to have looked like just from its skull. Clue: it was a big beaked bird, but it couldn’t fly!

 

Activity 5:

Let’s stick around in the natural history section…

The Natural History Museum in London has a huge hall called the Hintze Hall.  Over the years the hall has featured huge skeletons of animals – a sperm whale, an African elephant, the cast of a Triceratops, a Diplodocus, and currently, a Blue Whale.

These are all huge creatures. Can you move, sound, and act like them with big actions? Can you draw any of these creatures? Which of these creatures is the oldest? Which do you think is the biggest?

 

Activity 6:

Let’s move our own skeleton, your bones, around. Start at the top with your skull, your jaw bone, your neck bones, and create actions with them all. Carry on down your body moving all of your bones until you reach your toe bones (your metatarsals). Create a dance with all your skeleton movements to one of these songs with a skeleton theme – Boogie in my Bones, Mueva Los Huesos, Shake your Bones.

 

Activity 7:

Let’s head to the local history section of the museum… Leeds Museums and Galleries have recently put part of their collection online. Have an explore around the different collections, then write an acrostic poem about the collection, with something you’ve seen standing for each letter of the word ‘MUSEUM’. It could be:

Magnificent costumes

Unusual vacuum cleaner

Signatures on old letters

Etc.

 

Activity 8:

Let’s head to the conservation and restoration department of the museum that works to make repairs to objects, and to ensure that objects that are 100s of years old stay in good condition. Watch this video of an 18th century porcelain lion being repaired. Try your hand at being a restorer, and mix paints to try to colour match different colours of objects around you. Can you colour match the exact red of a kit kat wrapper, the exact green of your apple, the exact blue of your facecloth, etc.

Museum exhibits can change and move around, but that can involve a lot of work as things in museums are often rare, precious or very breakable! Watch this video to see what happened when ‘Dippy’ the Diplodocus was being moved from the Natural History Museum.

How would you carry something huge? How would you hold and move something very delicate?

Try moving individual grains of dry rice from one bowl to another, being very careful not to drop any  delicate grains. Imagine the grains were precious objects in a museum – carefully does it!

Imagine you’re balancing an ancient artefact on your head (you could use a book, bean bag, or pillow), can you transport it from one section of your museum to the other without dropping and breaking it?

 

Activity 9:

There are some very specific museums in the world, for example: a watering can museum in Germany, ‘Gnomesville’ in Australia, ‘Cuckooland’ in England, a toilet seat art museum in Texas and The Butter Museum in Ireland. There’s also museums for lawnmowers, pencils, crochet, and biscuit tins!

If you had to open a museum about one specific thing, what would it be? Design an invitation for the grand opening!

 

Activity 10:

The National Museum of Scotland has created some Yoga videos, where the poses match some of the artefacts in their collection – see if you can try any of the moves, or the breathing exercises.

 

Activity 11:

Find an interesting object in your house that could be found in a museum – how would you show and tell it to visitors? If you don’t have any actual artefacts just use your imagination… The chewed up pencil on my desk is actually from the Jurassic era, and was the first pencil ever to be removed from a T Rex’s mouth!

 

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventurous News in History

This week’s theme:

Adventurous News – This Week in History

 

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Fact of the week: This week in history saw the first flight around the world, a rocket launch, the release of an Oscar-winning adventure film, the birthday of a newsreader and Hollywood star, and some musical firsts.

 

Activity 1:

On Sept. 28, 1924, two United States Army Air Service planes completed the first ever circumnavigation of the world by air, landing in Seattle 175 days after their mission began.

Have a listen ‘Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines’ and come up for some actions for flying, for ‘up’, ‘down’, and ‘loop-the-loop’.

If you flew around the world over the course of 175 days what different sights do you think you’d see? Draw some of the sights you’d see from the sky – maybe the Pyramids in Egypt, Mickey Mouse in Florida, a colourful Indian festival, tulips in Holland, polar bears in the Arctic, etc.

 

Activity 2:

On September 28, 1889 it was first defined what the official length of a meter was. Grab a tape measure and see if you can measure a meter.

Try making a paper plane for your own ‘around the world’ flight attempt. What’s the furthest you can make your plane travel? Grab the tape measure and work out the distance!

Try making gliders – how far can you make a drinking straw glider travel?

Take measurements and create a scoreboard of your best measurements.

 

Activity 3:

On 28th September 2008 Space X launched the ‘Falcon 1’ rocket into orbit (on the 4th attempt!)

Create your own dramatic blast offs – have a countdown, turn your engines on, start low and gather your momentum for a powerful blast off up high, before passing the clouds and gliding through space.  Try acting it our in time to Rocket Man or Space Oddity.

 

Activity 4:

John Snow‘s birthday is the 28th of September 1947. John is a journalist and news reader for Channel 4 news. He’s also known for his love of colourful accessories.

Put on, or draw yourself a jazzy tie, or make yourself an origami one. Pop on some colourful socks like John, and have a go at sitting behind a desk and reading some of your own imaginative made-up news headlines. News just in: The queen has been spending lockdown in a dog kennel with her corgis;  Boris Johnson’s hair is actually a pet guinea pig; the Thames river is made of gravy; and Bronia used to be in ABBA.

 

Activity 5:

On September 29th 1947 Dizzy Gillespie presented his 1st Carnegie Hall concert in New York.

Dizzy was an American jazz trumpeter, composer, and bandleader who was one of the key figures of the bebop movement.

Look at the most common jazz instruments: saxophone, trumpet, trombone, piano, bass, drums, and guitar. Act out playing or holding them.

Now watch Dizzy’s unique performance style – blow out your cheeks to blow your trumpet and imagine joining in with the band.

 

Activity 6:

On sept 29th 1957 Buddy Holly & Crickets their released 2nd single “Oh Boy!” Across the world there are Buddy Holly dance contests – create your own rock and roll dance moves to do along in time to the 50s hit! Or play along with your own homemade instruments (pen drumming, hand claps, and rice shakers would work really well).

 

Activity 7:

October 1st is Julie Andrews’ 84th birthday.

Take an adventure to the Austrian mountains to celebrate Julie in The Sound of Music – recreate the opening scene by spinning on a vast mountain top, visiting trees and rivers, can you hit Julie’s high notes?!

Practice your best yodelling! You could even make your own string puppets like in the film! If you attach wool of string handles to a toilet tube body, with an attached cardboard face, with wool or string legs attached to milk bottle top feet you should get a puppet of your own!

Re-write the lyrics to ‘These are a few of my favourite things’ to sing about your favourite things.

 

Activity 8:

On October 2nd 1957 the film “The Bridge on the River Kwai” was released. It went on to win the Oscar for Best Picture. The film is an adventure epic war film based on a novel written by Pierre Boulle. The film uses the historical setting of the construction of the Burma Railway in 1942–1943.

Imagine crossing a bridge – is it wobbly, do you have to carefully place your feet, what would help with your balance? How to you feel if you peer over the edge – are you a long way up? Is there a river under you – how long do you think it would take a dropped pebble to make a splash into the water below you? Can you spot any crocodiles in the river? Can you make the sounds of trains crossing the bridge? Can you help with the construction of the bridge – put your back into it! Imagine escaping and running away from the unkind people making you work long hours making repairs to the bridge.

Come up with actions for all of the above. Try a game of musical statues to the theme some from the film – pause the song to do the actions you came up with.

 

Homework:

Take time this week to see if there’s anything in the news that you hear about that you think is interesting, funny, positive, or worth sharing. Draw the news story and bring it to next week’s session to present to your group as if you were a newsreader!

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures to the outdoors – Mountains

This week’s theme:

Adventures to the outdoors – Mountains

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week…

 

Fact of the week: The Cairngorms are a mountain range in the eastern Highlands of Scotland

 

Activity 1:

Sing along with ‘She’ll be coming round the Mountain’ – come up with your own verses… what will she be doing next? Give us your best ‘yee haw’s!

Hike along to ‘500 miles’!

 

Activity 2:

Nan Shepherd (born 1893) wrote the mountain memoir, ‘The Living Mountain’, based on her experiences of hill walking in the Cairngorms.  The Scottish landscape and weather played a major role in all of her writing. Shepherd would hike for days, foraging for berries and drinking from burns. She swam naked in lochs, trod barefoot on heather and, believing that “no one can know the mountain completely who has not slept upon it”, regularly slept out from May to October.

Come up with actions for hiking, eating berries, drinking from streams, swimming in lochs, walking in heather, and sleeping outside.

Find the Cairngorms on a map.

Learn some Scottish Gaelic words. Scottish Gaelic is a language that was spoken in Scotland as a native language until its replacement of English. Though almost everyone in Scotland can speak English, Gaelic is taught as a subject in some schools and remains spoken by around 50,000 people today.

Good Morning = madainn mhath (Pronunciation: matin va)

Thank You = Tapadh leit (Pronunciation: ta’pa let)

I’m Sorry = tha mi duilich (Pronunciation: ha mi doolich)

Bye = mar sin leibh (Pronunciation: mar shun leev)

 

Activity 3:

Hill-walking was Nan Shepherd’s great love; her collection of poetry ‘In the Cairngorms’ expresses her love of Scottish nature, and her work is clearly written by somebody has climbed the mountains often and truly knows them.

Come up with actions, signs, drawings, and sounds to go with Nan’s poem about the mountain environment.

 

Activity 4:

Poet Merryn Glover devised a new way to write poems that she called “The Cairngorms Lyric”. She did this in her role as writer in residence for the Cairngorms National Park.

She states that to write a Cairngorms Lyric Poem there are 3 rules:

Rule 1: A Cairngorms Lyric poem must have 15 words. [The 15 comes from facts about the Cairngorms National Park – it covers five local authorities, five of Scotland’s ten highest mountains are found here, and five of Scotland’s most iconic rivers flow out of it – so three times five is 15.]

Rule 2: The poem has to include an element of nature found in the Cairngorms park (think mountains, animals, weather, environment, rivers, sky, stars).

Rule 3: The poem needs to include one word of non-English origin, so a word from another language, or a traditional local Gaelic, Scots, or Pictish word – if you use the word “loch” you have one (or see activity 2)!

Write your own Cairngorms Lyric Poem following the rules above.

 

Activity 5:

Create some mountain art work by tearing a ragged edge on coloured paper like this or this.

Or, if you paint onto white paper, tearing a ragged edge can create a snow top mountain look when the white paper is revealed like this. You could add white chalk to create more snow on your edges, or add salt to your water colours to create a frosty mountain top look like this.

 

Activity 6:

Take a look at this this or this serene mountain view.  Can you spot where you could find any water, flowers/heather, birds.

Listen to this music and try some improvised dancing along to the music exploring how you think water, heather and birds would move.

 

Activity 7:

Pretend you have binoculars, or make some paper binoculars. What can you see from your view at the top of your mountain? Can you see anything through your binoculars that’s blue like the water? Purple like the heather? Green like the grass? White like the snow? Brown like the earth? Collect the items together and make a tabletop mountain colour-scape.

Imagine something you would be able to see far away through your binoculars. Pick something to draw from your imaginary mountain top view.

 

Activity 8:

It gets very cold towards the summit of mountain tops. When high mountain rivers and streams become frozen they make magnificent frozen shapes. Frozen water makes swirling shapes, curling shapes, jagged shapes and spiky shapes.

Draw spikes, swirls, curls and jagged edges in the air with your finger. Can you then draw these same shapes with your whole body, moving in a slow icy dance while listening to this icy music.

 

Activity 9:

Being at the top of a mountain can affect your ability to see in a few ways. A blizzard of snow can fill in your footsteps, and you won’t be able to see where you’ve been, or be able to follow the steps of the person in front of you. Being surrounded by nothing but the bright whiteness of glistening snow can cause a phenomenon called ‘Snow Blindness’. Cooling temperatures can cause mist and fog patches, where tiny droplets of water hanging in the air, making it hard to see anything in front of you. All of these factors can cause people to get lost when they’re mountain hiking.

Imagine you can’t see where you’re headed due to the mountain mists. To make it safely down the mountain get used to using only your other senses. Try calmly dancing with your eyes closed or with the lights down to this music. Try listening to the music with your eyes closed. In a chair carefully stretch your arms around you – can you sense where you are?

 

Activity 10:

The Northern Lights are visible on clear nights in the Cairngorms. Nights in this part of Scotland are amongst the darkest in the UK, meaning the deepest depths of the galaxy shine far brighter here than in towns and cities.

Imagine watching the Northern Lights from the top of the Cairngorm Mountains. Act out with your arms in the air the swirls of colour filling the night sky – the wisps of  green, the swish of blue, the flash of pinks, the swirls of purples, the bands of yellow, and the twinkle of stars.

Pick one of the Northern Lights colours and with your hand imagine painting the room around you with that magical colour of light.

With coloured chalk, cotton wool to smudge, and a cardboard mountain cut-out, create your own Northern Lights artwork.

 

Homework:

Naturalist John Muir once wrote this about how happy climbing mountains makes him feel:

‘Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves.’

Draw a collage of some of the happy things he mentions, and/or some things that make you happy about being outdoors.

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Adventures to The Outdoors – Camping

This week’s theme:

Adventures to the outdoors – Camping

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here. This weeks features tents under the constellations of Cassiopeia, Cygnus, Lyra and Hercules.

 

Activities for the week:

 

Fact of the week: Thomas Hiram Holding is considered the founder of modern camping and wrote the first edition of The Camper’s Handbook in 1908.

 

Activity 1:

Try coming up with some verses of your own and actions to go with these classic camping songs: She’ll be coming round the mountain, Oh Suzanna, and Home, home on the range.

Try accompanying some of these songs to sing around a campfire with body percussion, or natural percussion, such as tapping rocks, stones, logs, and sticks together: Take me Home Country Roads, American Pie, Horse with no name, and Ring of Fire.

 

Activity 2:

When you’re camping in the great outdoors, away from towns and cities there’s less light pollution so you’re more able to see the stars. Try some Stargazing by looking at the shapes of constellations and seeing if you can make the shapes with your body.

Try stretching your arms out like Cygnus

Make a ‘W’ with your hands or arms like Cassiopeia

Curve your back like Ursa Minor

Curl your bicep like Scorpius

Make a house shape like Auriga

What other constellation shapes can you make with your body?

 

Activity 3:

Camping in the USA and Canada often means camping in bear territory; black and brown bears will likely keep their distance from you, but Grizzly Bears won’t.

Act like a hungry grizzly bear. Growl and bear your claws and teeth. Draw some bear footprints so you know what to look out for.

There are ways to avoid bear attacks when camping – check for bear tracks at your potential camp site, if you see any, don’t camp there! Hang your food in trees to they can’t smell it. If a bear approaches you, avoid eye contact and back away slowly. Don’t turn your back to the bear or run away, running will make the bear chase you. Be loud and clang pots. Come up with actions for all of these responses.

 

Activity 4:

Finding a good place to camp – looking at different environments, why might they be good or bad? In a forest. In the desert. By a lake. On a mountain. In your back garden

Make a den using your sofa and blankets to pitch up to camp in the location that you think is the best environment.

 

Activity 5:

Sometimes when you’re camping you have to be resourceful and imaginative as you can’t carry everything and the kitchen sink with you, so have to make-do with what’s around you. Let’s pack a camping bag. You have 1 minute each to: Find something in your room to use as a pillow; then something to use as a plate; something to use as a spoon; something to protect you from rain; something to catch a leak in your tent; something to hammer in a tent peg in with.

 

Activity 6:

Try making an origami tent like this.

Make a tent with craft sticks like this.

Make a twig tepee that you can cover with cloth (eg a facecloth, handkerchief, etc).

 

Activity 7:

Use a glass jar, tissue paper and an LED candle or torch to make a glowing campfire to toast cotton wool marshmallows on.

Make a banjo to play around your campfire – you could try putting elastic bands around a plastic tub, loaf tin, or tissue box. Or, try loom bands around a jar lid.

 

Activity 8:

Read, or ask somebody to read to you this campfire poem. It’s made up of Onomatopoeia. Words that are onomatopoeic imitate the sound that they describe. Make the sounds as the words appear in the poem. Come up with actions for the poem.

 

Activity 9:

Write a Camping Acrostic Poem. Spell out the word ‘Camping’ and use your senses to fill in the blanks here to make your very own camping poem.

 

Activity 10:

There’s loads of Scout badges you can get when camping, such as the ‘Outdoor Challenge Award’, the ‘Camper Activity Badge’, the ‘Forester Activity Badge’ etc. Draw some ‘alternative’ Scout badges that you’d get for doing well at home, or at Purple Patch. Do you think you deserve to be awarded any specific badges for surviving in lockdown? Draw your badges.

 

Homework: Make a postcard from your camping trip. What will you draw on the front? What will your message about your camping trip say? Who would you send the postcard to?

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

New Theme: Adventure

This week’s theme:

Our New Theme: Adventure

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week:

 

Fact of the week: An adventure is defined as ‘an unusual, exciting, and possibly dangerous activity, such as a trip or experience’ – we’re going to be going on lots of adventures this year!

 

Activity 1:

Our new theme for 2020-2021 is ‘Adventure’! Learn the new warm up dance – it’s filled full of songs about Adventure. Do you recognise any of them?

 

Activity 2:

What’s the best adventure you’ve ever been on? Where did you go, what did you do? Draw your memories from your adventure. Act out any particularly good memories.

 

What’s your favourite adventure film? Is it The Goonies/Hook/Back To The Future/Star Wars/Indiana Jones/Lord of the Rings/Jumanji/Wizard of Oz, or something else entirely? Draw your favourite parts from the film, or act them out.

 

Activity 3:

What things do you think we’ll need to pack in our adventure rucksack for the year ahead? What things do we need at Purple Patch? Can you find/draw these things? It might be a paint brush, a cup of tea, and a musical instrument!

 

Activity 4:

Colour in the ‘Adventure’ colouring page that you can download for here. You can also colour in our new colouring page that marks the start of our new Purple Patch Adventure year too.

Find them online here.

 

Activity 5:

Learn the new Cool Down signed song. This year the song is called ‘Anywhere’.

The lyrics to sing along to can be found here.

 

Homework:

Try practising the warm up and cool down signed song all this week, we’ll need to get good at them as we’ll be doing both every week at Purple Patch!

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Daily activity 116-120: Behind the Doors of a Palace

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – Behind the Doors of a Palace

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here. It’s a corgi party at Balmoral castle!

 

Activities for the week:

 

Mon 31st August

Daily Activity 116: Historical Courts

Fact of the day: A royal court was made up of thousands of people, including the royal family, guests, workers in the household, entertainers and bodyguards.

Activity 1:

Watch this video showing the type of dancing European royals and wealthy aristocrats used to do to entertain themselves in the 1600s. Being able to dance was considered an important skill for any member of the upper class! Social dances in royal courts were often elegant with complicated patterns of people weaving between each other.

Can you create your own royal court dance? Try using some of the movements in the video and make sure you move all around the room! Maybe try dancing with somebody you live with and move towards, away and around each other.

Activity 2:

Royal banquets have always been very exciting and lavish. When King Henry VIII was King, in the Tudor times, he would be served meats and birds such as venison, swan, peacock, heron, porpoise and seagull. Forks weren’t invented, so they ate with a knife and their fingers!

Design a menu fit for a King or Queen – will you have a starter, main course and dessert or serve even more courses? Make sure to decorate your menu, perhaps it could match the gold and silver dishes that would be present at a Tudor feast, or the elaborate flower decorations that would be at Queen Victoria’s banquets in the 1800s.

Activity 3:

Court jesters were part of the royal court in the Medieval and Renaissance times, and their job was to entertain guests with jokes, magic tricks, songs and music, acrobatics, and dancing. Why not make a court jester’s hat and see if you can entertain other people in your house? Here are some joke ideas:

 

Knock! Knock!
Who’s there?
Queen?
Queen who?
Queen your room. It’s filthy!

 

Why did the queen go to the dentist?

Answer: To get crowns on her teeth.

 

Why is England the wettest country?

Answer: The queen has reigned for years!

 

Activity 4:

A fanfare is a flourish of music played to announce the arrival of the King or Queen and is often played on trumpets because trumpets used to be associated with royalty. Have a listen to these examples of fanfares from fiction and real life, then see if you can come up with your own!

Why not try using your fanfare when someone important to you arrives. You could use it when a friend comes to visit, or someone in your house enters a room!

 

 

Tuesday 1st September

Daily Activity 117: Palaces around the world

Fact of the day: The largest palace in the world is the Royal Palace of Madrid; it has 3,418 rooms!

Activity 1:

Take a virtual tour of Buckingham Palace, England, the Palace of Versailles, France, Schonbrunn Palace, Vienna, or Topkapi Palace, Istanbul.

Activity 2:

Depending on where you are in the world, the traditional royal dress can be very different, but always spectacular and impressive, especially the crowns and jewels! Can you make your own crown jewels – why not use tinfoil to make your crown shiny or add glitter for some extra sparkle!

Here are some examples of crowns from around the world: British crown jewels can be visited in the Tower of London. Albania’s crown of Skanderbeg is from the 15th century! The Holy Crown of Hungary is the country’s official coronation crown. The crown jewels of Ireland were stolen in 1907 and still no one knows who did it!

Activity 3:

Design and build your own palace! Take inspiration from some palaces around the world:

Will it have lots of different buildings like the Forbidden City in Japan? Will it be a bright colour like the Winter Palace in Russia? Will it be built on a hill like the Potala Palace in Tibet?

You could build your palace out of anything you like! Lego, clay, card, sand, etc.

 

 

Wednesday 2nd September

Daily Activity 118: The Royal Family

Fact of the day: There has been a British monarchy (King or Queen and royal family) for around 1200 years – in that time there has been 61 rulers.

Activity 1:

The British Royal Family has quite a big family tree. Can you create your own family tree? You could use photos of your family members, and you could even draw it onto an image of a tree.

Add-On Activity:

The line of succession decides who will take over the role of King or Queen in each generation. Normally, it follows the eldest child and any of their children, before going to the next oldest child and their children. Can you follow the line of succession on the royal family tree (above)? It goes: The Queen -> The Prince of Wales -> The Duke of Cambridge -> Prince George of Cambridge -> Princess Charlotte of Cambridge -> Prince Louis of Cambridge -> The Duke of Sussex -> Master Archie Mountbatten-Windsor… and on!

Can you follow a line of succession on your own family tree? Who would be first line for the throne? Where would you be Prince or Princess of?

Activity 2:

The first known royal portrait painted in person is of King Henry VII, in 1505. When a King or Queen took to the throne, a state portrait would be commissioned to present them to their subjects. Paintings were based on how the King or Queen wanted to be seen by their people and would include specific objects to represent certain qualities and characteristics. Here are some examples:

This painting of King George III includes a column to show his strength. This print of Elizabeth I shows her holding an orb and spectre as symbols of her power. This portrait of Queen Elizabeth II (our current queen) was painted to celebrate her coronation, and the embroidery of olive branches on her robe symbolises peace.

Can you draw or paint a royal portrait of yourself or someone you know? What qualities might they like to show in the painting and how could you show them? For example, someone could show they are well travelled by including a world map or globe in their portrait, or you could include an instrument to show they like music.

Activity 3:

Imagine you’re meeting a member of the royal family – how do you greet them?! There are some traditions and rules of how to address royal family members– try some out!

The King: ‘Your Majesty’

The Queen: ‘Your Majesty’ with a curtsy or bow (though a handshake is also accepted)

The Emperor: ‘Your Imperial Majesty’ with a curtsy or bow. In Japan, where there is the last ruling emperor, your bow or curtsy should lower you below the Emperor, as a sign of respect.

The Prince or Princess: ‘Your Royal Highness’

The Duke or Duchess: ‘Your Grace’

 

 

 

Thursday 3rd September

Daily Activity 119: Queen Elizabeth II

Fact of the day: Queen Elizabeth II is the longest reigning monarch in British history; she has been Queen of England for 68 years!

Activity 1:

The Queen of England’s coronation took place on 2nd June 1953. The ceremony is a huge and joyous event with lots of music: here is a list of the music played at Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation. Create a playlist of music you would have played at your coronation if you were being crowned King or Queen. Think about how you would want your music choices to make you feel: happy, powerful, excited, calm? Play your choices and move grandly around your house pretending to address your subjects!

Activity 2:

In the Summer, the Queen hosts garden parties in the Buckingham Palace gardens. Apparently, at each garden party around 27,000 cups of tea, 20,000 sandwiches and 20,000 slices of cake are consumed! Hold your own garden party with people you live with. You could dress up in smart clothes, hang up bunting, eat cucumber sandwiches and cake and drink lots of tea!

Activity 3:

Imagine you were King or Queen for the day, what would you do? Why not write or draw a diary entry imagining all the things you would do as King or Queen – did you attend any events, like a royal ball or afternoon tea? Did you have any important meetings with the Prime Minister? Did you play with the Queen’s royal corgis?!

Activity 4:

In history, Kings and Queens used to have more power than our Queen does now to make rules that their subjects had to follow. If you were King or Queen, what rule would you enforce? Would it benefit everyone in the country?  Write your rules down and decorate them.

 

 

Friday 4th September

Daily Activity 120: Fictional Royals

Fact of the day: In Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the Queen of Hearts has a quick temper and is famous for shouting ‘Off with their head!’ at the slightest offence!

Activity 1:

The Queen of Hearts is a character in Lewis Carrol’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. In Wonderland, she liked to play croquet with flamingos and hedgehogs. Try making your own croquet set and play like the Queen of Hearts.

Activity 2:

The Queen of Hearts is from a pack of playing cards, and there is a rhyme about her and the other royal cards:

 

The Queen of Hearts

She made some tarts,

All on a summer’s day;

The Knave of Hearts

He stole those tarts,

And took them clean away.

The King of Hearts

Called for the tarts,

And beat the knave full sore;

The Knave of Hearts

Brought back the tarts,

And vowed he’d steal no more.

 

Why not act out the poem adding actions and sound effects?

Activity 3:

The legend of King Arthur has been told for centuries, and there are so many stories surrounding him that none are considered the ‘original’ or ‘correct’ one! One of the most famous stories is of King Arthur is the Sword in the Stone: Arthur was the only person who could pull the sword out of the stone, revealing him to be the true King of England!

Make your own sword using cardboard, stand it up between 2 pieces of furniture like it’s stuck in a stone and pretend to pull it out like King Arthur!

Activity 4:

The White Witch described herself as ‘Her Imperial Majesty Jadis, Queen of Narnia, Chatelaine of Cair Paravel, Empress of the Lone Islands’ and was the evil ruler of Narnia in C.S.Lewis’ story The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. She put Narnia into a state of eternal Winter, with no Christmas! The evil Queen would turn her subjects to stone if they did not obey her – play a game of musical statues, making sure to freeze when the music stops so the White Witch doesn’t catch you out! Here are some royalty themed songs you could use: Dancing Queen, ABBAKiller Queen, QueenRoyals, Lorde.

 

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Daily activities 111-115: The Mysteries of Africa

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of … Africa

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week:

 

Mon 24th August

Daily activity 111: African language and culture

Fact of the day: The distance from Yorkshire to Central Africa is about 4600 miles. A flight from Yorkshire to the centre of this continent would take about 14.5 hours. If we were to walk to Central Africa, we would be about 1420 hours on the road and boat.

Activity 1:

Find the continent of Africa on a map.

The continent of Africa is made up of 54 recognised countries and states – are there any you’ve heard of before?

Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Can you find any of them on a map of Africa?

Activity 2:

There are an estimated 1500-2000 African languages but Swahili is the most spoken language in Africa, with over 100 million speakers. Practice saying the following words in Swahili: ‘Sasa’ (Hi), ‘Jambo’ (Hello), ‘Kwa Heri’ (Goodbye), ‘Tutaonana’ (See You Later), ‘Ahsante’ (Thank You), ‘Tafadhali’ (Please), ‘Sawa’ (OK). You can hear them being pronounced here.

Activity 3:

If you have them, try some foods from across Africa: dates, couscous, papaya, mangoes, avocados, aubergine, bananas, chickpeas, figs, black-eyed peas, corn.

 

 

Tuesday 25 August

Daily Activity 112: African music

Fact of the day: Among the most important African instruments are drums and other percussion. They’re used in almost all African cultures for ceremonies and rituals, some of which involve dancing.

Activity 1:

Listen to some of these sounds made by an African instrument, the Djembe drum. Here’s another video. Try and beat along, perhaps patting your palms on your thighs, a table, or a bucket, or a tub, or by tapping a pen on a table, or clapping or stomping your feet.

Activity 2:

It’s believed that the Djembe drum goes back to the Mali (Western African) empire. The drum was supposedly played for the king of Mali wherever he went. The Djembe is a very loud drum, so people would play it so that it could be heard from village to village as a way to communicate certain messages, such as to tell others that the King was on his way. There is a specific Djembe drum beat to signify that the king is coming (see here). They are sometimes known as ‘talking drums’.

Without using your voice, what noises or rhythms can you make to communicate messages? What noise would you make to get somebody’s attention, tell somebody you’re bored, to say I love you, to say you’re cross, to say you’re hot. What else can you communicate through noise and rhythm?

Activity 3:

Can you remember when ‘Africa’ by Toto used to be in our ‘Around the World’ warm up dance? Have a listen and see if you can remember any of the dance moves we used to do, and try to add some more – the moves could be about African mountains, animals, deserts, heat, starry African skies.

Activity 4:

Have a dance to some African music such as Meridian by Wulomei, Fatoumata Diawara – Bissa, Kiki Gyan – Disco Dancer, Yeke yeke by Mory Kante, Miriam Makeba – Pata Pata, Ebo Taylor – Come Along and Moussa Doumbia – Femme D’aujourd’hui.

 

 

Wednesday 26 August

Daily Activity 113: African dance and movement

Fact of the day: Hippopotamuses love water, which is why the Greeks named them the “river horse.” Hippos spend up to 16 hours a day submerged in rivers and lakes to keep their massive bodies cool under the hot African sun. Hippos are graceful in water.

Activity 1:

You could try out an African dance lesson! And another!

Activity 2:

Try some African body percussion movements.

Activity 3:

Can you act like and move like these African animals – cheetah, elephant, giraffe, lion, meercat, gazelle, crocodile, ostrich, hippo. How would these African animals dance at a disco? How would they move around a supermarket?

 

 

Thursday 27 August

Daily activity 114: African Landscape and habitat

Fact of the day: The African landscape is made up of a huge mixture of rainforests, great lakes, deserts, coastal beaches, mountains, vast rivers, savannah, towns and cities.

Activity 1:

Create a tabletop African landscape, find yellow objects to represent the sands of the desert, blue for the rivers and lakes, tall items to represent mountain tops, greens to depict the lush rainforests,, do you have any animal figures or pictures you could add into the savannah, do you have any fairy lights that could represent the lights of cities?

Activity 2:

Can you lead an expedition and climb the highest mountain in Africa, Mt Kilimanjaro? What will you need on your trip? How will you cope with the cold temperatures at the top? How many days do you think you’ll be climbing for? Try some of these exercises for hikers.

Activity 3:

Can you travel by boat down the world’s longest river, the river Nile? Which countries  will you pass through? What animals and plants will you see on your journey? How quickly can you say the tongue twister “in a while, Nile Crocodile“? Follow some of the arm movements of these people paddling down the Nile.

Activity 4:

The Nile river no longer floods each year because in 1970 the Aswan High Dam was built to hold back the water. Create a tin foil river, curved up at the sides to create a long semi-circular tube shape, to flow water down the channel of, into a bowl. Using plasticine/bluetack/clay make a blockage in your tube ‘river’ to act as the dam. Flow water down your river, watch the water collect behind your dam. What happens when your dam breaks and the water rushes down – would it cause destruction to the villages along your river?

 

 

 

Friday 28 August

Daily activity 115: African art

Fact of the day: Traditional African fabric is hand-made using techniques that have often been passed down from generation to generation for thousands of years.

Activity 1:

Ankara cloth is a colourful material made using a printing technique that uses wax to resist the dye (similar to Asian Batik).

You could try making wax resist art of your own. Try rubbing a wax candle, or wax crayon on card into a pattern. Paint the card and the pattern will appear, resisting the paint.

If you want to try it with cloth, mix a flour/water ‘paste’ and apply thickly to fabric with a piping bag or make thin trails of it into a pattern, in whatever pattern you want! Dry with a hairdryer. Or, use thick PVA glue trails using a nozzle and allow to dry overnight. Use thinned down acrylic paint, or a natural dye such as beetroot, and brush on. Dry with a hairdryer. Then peel off dried ‘paste’ or glue to reveal the resist pattern beneath!

Activity 2:

Wear your most colourful, Ankara-style clothing for an African inspired fashion shoot or catwalk runway of your own.

Kente cloth, (known as nwentom to the Akan people of Ghana), is a type of fabric made of interwoven cloth strips, men tended to wear it toga style; or tied over one shoulder.  Women traditionally wear Kente cloth as a wraparound dress or skirt. Tie fabric around yourself in this way for the next part of your fashion shoot or catwalk show!

Activity 3:

The folktale, ‘The Spider Weaver; the Legend of Kente Cloth’ tells the tale of how Kente cloth was inspired by a master spider weaver. Read, or ask somebody to read to you the story.

Can you act out the actions of weaving, as done by the spider: ‘Dip! Twist. Turn and glide. The spider made her way across and back over the web. She moved like a woman dancing, regal and very graceful.’

You could try weaving paper, in the style of Kente cloth by making decorative strips to weave.

 

 

Why not take photos of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share them on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Daily activity 106-110: Famous Artists

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People – Famous Artists

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week:

 

Monday 17th August

Daily Activity 106: Artistic styles and mediums

Fact of the day: There are many different distinctive and recognizable art styles.

Activity 1:

Our theme for our new year at Purple Patch from September will be ‘Adventure’!

Colour this ‘Adventure’ colouring-in sheet in your own artistic style.

Activity 2:

Or, can you colour the Adventure sheet in with different mediums used by famous artists, such as collage, paint, pencil, crayon, watercolours, pen, chalk, or cross hatching.

Activity 3:

Can you colour the different letters of Adventure sheet in the different styles of a famous artist?

You could colour with dots in a technique called ‘Pointillism’ like Georges Seurat.

You could try colouring it in a Van Gogh style, i.e. with a series of dots or dashes of his paintbrush rather than full colouring in.

You could use primary colours like Roy Lichtenstein’s Pop Art.

You could try “Color Field” painting – layers of large flat, solid colour spread across the canvas, like Mark Rothko.

You could try colouring in large geometric squares and rectangles like Piet Mondrian.

You could try colouring in small multicoloured squares like Kari Bienert.

Activity 4:

Send us a photo of your colouring-in, or bring it to show Purple staff at any of your zooms this week and we’ll take snaps there. We’re going to make a collage of everyone’s ‘Adventure’ artwork to share on social media to announce our new theme to the world!

 

 

Tuesday 18th August

Daily Activity 107: Art Galleries

Fact of the Day: There are roughly 19,000 art galleries in 124 countries, in 3533 cities worldwide.

Activity 1:

Take the art history challenge! Can you dress up and act as if you were a famous work of art hung in a gallery?

You could become your favourite painting, or could try acting any of these:

Grant Wood, American Gothic

Edward Hopper, Morning Sun

Edward Hopper, Automat

Leonard Da Vinci, Lady with an Ermine

Johannes Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring

Frida Kahlo, Self portrait with Bonito

Kehinde Wile, President Barack Obama

René Magritte, The Son of Man

Please take a photo of yourself as a work of art and share it with us! You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

Make an art gallery for an animal, bug, or imaginary creature in your life, like this or this!

Please take a photo or video of any animals enjoying your gallery and share it with us! You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

Go on a virtual tour of the National Gallery from the comfort of your house, or travel to Italy to go on a virtual tour of the Vatican Museum, Rome or travel to the Guggenheim, Bilbao in Spain for a virtual tour , or to the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, South Korea.

Can you find all of these places on a map of the world?

 

 

Wednesday 19th August

Daily Activity 108: Art and mindfulness

Fact of the day: Claude Monet created his water lilies paintings as a respite from hectic city life.

Activity 1:

Watch any of the 5 minute videos from the National Gallery which show a ‘slow’, meditative and mindful look at art – Turner’s ‘Rain, Steam and Speed – The Great Western Railway’, Redon’s ‘Ophelia among the Flowers’, Rosa Bonheur’s ‘The Horse Fair’ or Bonington’s ‘An Estuary in Northern France’.

Activity 2:

Have a go at Ailsa’s mindful mandala drawing exercise:

Or watch Chemaine’s Mindful Wander which we have shared before:

Activity 3:

There’s a long history of mindfulness trickling into to the art world, and artists going into nature to find serenity. Monet created his water lilies panoramas for the Orangerie Museum in Paris as a respite from hectic city life.

Create a relaxing soundscape of gentle water that would could imagine a Monet’s serene Lily pads floating on. Gently and slowly pour water from one container to another, make gentle waves and swirls in the water with your hands, trickle water between your hands and fingers.

You could also listen to these gentle water sounds.

 

 

Thursday 20th August

Daily activity 109: Surrealists

Fact of the day: Surrealism is a form of art that began in around 1920 (100 years ago). The best known surrealist artworks play with and mix-up uncommon and alternative imagery to create unreal, or fantastic creations.

Activity 1:

Surrealists have alternative ways of thinking about the world.

How are you? You alright? How’s it going? are all common ways of greeting somebody but they might not be specific enough to tell how a person is truly feeling. Artist Keeley Shaw’s art here shows alternative, often surreal things that we can ask instead of ‘how are you?’. One interesting idea is asking ‘What colour is your heart today?

What colour is your heart today? How does it feel? Is it blue, is it golden, is it grey? Is it pink with glitter and confetti? Search your house for something that matches the colour of how you feel today. Try it again tomorrow and see if you feel a different colour.

Activity 2:

Hannah Höch was a German artist born in 1889. She’s best known for her surreal collages and photo montages, colliding together different combinations of contrasting images to make something unique. Try cutting up an old magazine and experiment with making your own surreal collaged images.

Activity 3:

Pick out of a 3 bowls different ‘who’ ‘where’ ‘what are they wearing’ prompts to create some surreal paintings from, or some surreal stories to act out and dress up with. Taking inspiration from the themes in the paintings of Surrealist artist Leonora Carrington, in your ‘who’ bowl you could have a giantess, a ghost, a child, a horse, a zebra. In your ‘where’ you could have a castle, a moonlit night, a grand room with golden curtains, a green field. In your ‘what are they wearing’ bowl you could have prompts such as a red robe, a fish costume, huge long legs, a big curly wig. Or, come up with your own surreal ideas!

Add on activity:

Can you make yourself a Salvador Dali moustache from items you have at home?

You can share your surreal work on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

 

Friday 21st August

Daily Activity 110: Northern English Artists

Fact of the day: LS Lowry is famous for painting scenes of life in the urban and industrial districts of North West England. His human figures, were often referred to as “matchstick men”.

Activity 1:

LS Lowry made artwork about Northern towns. Move your body like some of the shapes and activities in his paintings.

Painting 1 – point yourself upwards like the steeple of the church and scurry about like the dogs. Make the shape of the street lamp and the curve of the street.

Painting 2 –  Walk in straight lines like the factory workers. Billow your arms like smoke leaving a chimney stack. Be in a rush like the people who are late.

Painting 3 – Scurry across the street, be jostled by other commuters, drive a car, ride a bicycle.

Painting 4 – Peer into the window of a fish and chips shop – what will you order? Wait your turn, walk a dog, push a pram, put your coat and hat on.

What else can you see in the paintings? You could also have a dance to this song about LS Lowry.

Activity 2:

Barbara Hepworth was a British sculptor, who was born in Wakefield, Yorkshire in 1903. One of her sculptures is called ‘3 Forms’. Which 3 different sized things can you find to try and stack? Can you stack 3 different sized rocks on top of each other? 3 bananas of different sizes on top of each other? Can you stack 3 balloons? 3 cushions? 3 apples? 3 tomatoes? Can you stack a banana, and apple, and a tomato?

Activity 3:

Artist David Hockney was born in Bradford. Imagine living inside a colourful painting by David Hockney. Search your house for the most colourful items, fabrics, packaging you can find. Sit down and build all the colour up around you, creating a hugely colourful Hockney art den, as if you’re living inside one of his paintings.

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Daily activity 101-105: This Week in History

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News. This week In History

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

 

Activities for the week:

 

Monday 10th August

Daily activity 101: Jack Haley

Fact of the day:

On 10th August 1898 American Actor Jack Haley was born

Activity 1:

You might not know his name, but Jack Haley played the famous part of the Tin Man in the original Wizard of Oz film.

Make foil coverings for your shoes and hands, or a tin foil hat so that you can become more like the tin man. Make metal sounds like Dorothy did when she first finds the Tin Man  – you could tap together spoons, pans, tin cans, tap a radiator – what other metal objects can you find in your house? Which metal objects do magnets stick to?

Act out being a tin man, rusted solid and frozen stiff, try walking with locked knees and waving with locked elbows. Slowly imagine oiling yourself from your head to toes… use imaginary oil to unlock your neck, unlock your shoulders, unlock your arms, unlock your wrists, unlock your fingers. Then unlock your waist, unlock your hips, unlock your knees, your ankles, and your toes. When you’re rust-free and flexible, dance like a well oiled tin man!

Activity 2:

Make yourself a tin foil tin man sculpture. You could shine a torch on it, and draw it’s shadow too.

Activity 3:

The Tin Man visits the Wizard as he doesn’t have a heart.

In the song, ‘If I only had a heart’ the Tin Man lists why he’d like a heart: ‘I’d be tender, I’d be gentle, and awful sentimental regarding love and art. I would be friends with the sparrows. Just to register emotion – jealousy, devotion, and really feel the part.’

Show others that you have a kind heart and do thoughtful, gentle and kind things for the people that you live with today. Show them your emotions.

Create some heart paint prints using a cardboard tube. See if you can print in the rhythm of a heart beat.  Or, you could make a rainbow heart hanging.

Add on activity:

Learn some of the signs to ‘Somewhere over the Rainbow’ from The Wizard of Oz

 

 

Tuesday 11th August

Daily activity 102: The Beatles

Fact of the day:

11th August is a popular day in the history of The Beatles

Activity 1:

On this day in 1964 the Beatles’ “A Hard Days Night” film opened in New York and on this day in 1965 the Beatles movie “Help” opened in New York.

The adverts for ‘Help’ show the Beatles using semaphore to spell out ‘Help’. However, according to the photographer, “I had the idea of semaphore spelling out the letters “HELP”. But when we came to do the shot, the arrangement of the arms with those letters didn’t look good. So we decided to improvise and ended up with the best graphic positioning of the arms.” So, what they’re actually spelling is a jibbersih madeup word, not ‘Help’ at all.

Can you spell out the correct spelling of H.E.L.P using semaphore with either just your arms, or with flags (pillow cases/tea towels).

Activity 2:

On this day in 1966 the last ever Beatles concert tour of US began. Imagine you’re going on a tour of the USA, what would you pack? Draw it all in your suitcase or backpack.

Recreate your own concert. Make yourself a microphone, grab your air guitar (or make a cardboard guitar), put on your best rock star costume and imagine you’re on stage at a music venue in America, people are cheering for you, girls are screaming for you, people are applauding, there’s a spotlight just on you, the band kick in behind you as you take to the microphone. Perform a karaoke Beatles song, or dance as if you were a Beatle!

Activity 3:

On this day in 1968, the Beatles launched their own “Apple Records” record label.

Make yourself a tasty apple treat! You can make apple crisps by coring apples, slicing them into circles, tossing with cinnamon and sugar, then baking until quite dry.

Add on activity:

Play along with James’s Beatles song:

 

 

Wednesday 12th August

Daily activity 103: The Quagga

Fact of the day:

On August 12 1883 the last known Quagga (a type of zebra) died at a zoo in Amsterdam.

Activity 1:

A Quagga was a type of Zebra that became extinct, which means that there are no more of them in the world. Search your house for stripy things – it could be clothes, sheets, blankets, etc. Use them to disguise yourself as a mysterious Quagga. Little is known about the Quagga’s behaviour before it died out – what do you think you would eat? Act out where would you sleep, what would you do during the day, and how you would move.

Apparently the Quagga’s name was derived from the sound of its call which sounded like “Qwah Ha Ha”. Can you practice sounding like a Quagga. Common Zebras make sounds like this, can you practice that too?

Activity 2:

Make some stripy Quagga artwork by laying strips of masking tape onto a page in any direction. Paint or draw, covering the whole page in colour, and when the tape is removed it will leave a stripy pattern.

Activity 3:

Other animals that once lived but have now become extinct include the Dodo (a flightless bird), the Tasmanian Tiger (a dog with a wolf’s head), and the Megaloceros (a giant deer).

Make up some mysterious, wonderful creatures that may once have lived, but scientists never got a chance to study before they became extinct. You could draw or make models of them. Or, you could collage together different creatures from pictures in magazines. What would your creatures be called?

Add on activity:

Look back at our activities about The Black Mambas who help to protect wild animals and save species from being hunted to extinction.

 

 

Thursday 13th August

Daily activity 104: Sridevi Kapoor

Fact of the day:

On August 13th 1963, Indian actress Sridevi Kapoor was born. She was referred to as Indian cinema’s “first female superstar”.

Activity 1:

Sridevi Kapoor’s films included some amazing dancing. Try out some Bollywood dancing of your own with Jess’s video below.

Activity 2:

Sridevi’s films feature many expressive and melodramatic facial expressions to convey the high emotions in the films. In front of a mirror try and make your face act angry, happy, sad, frightened, awake, shocked, confused, disgusted. What else can you show with just your face?

Activity 3:

Sridevi appeared in many glamourous and romantic films, wearing wonderful jewellery. Make yourself some beads that you can wear as a necklace, bracelet, headdress, in your hair, around your hands, or anywhere that Sridevi would wear them! You can make some paper beads of your own from old magazines.

 

 

Friday 14th August

Daily activity 105: Oasis vs. Blur

Fact of the day:

August 14th 1995 was labelled the “Battle of Brit Pop” when rival bands Oasis and Blur released singles on the same day.

Activity 1:

The Oasis single released on this day in 1995 was ‘Roll With It’. Listen to the song and watch the band in the music video here [warning the video contains flashing lights, see here for a version without watching the band]. Try to act like singer Liam Gallagher in the video – reach to sing into an imaginary microphone a bit higher than your mouth, keep your arms behind your back, wear a big jacket, make yourself a rice shaker to act as your tambourine, create some big eyebrows for yourself, turn your back to the audience, be a bit ‘rock n roll’! You could try playing an air guitar in time with Noel Gallagher too. Or jump up and down in time with the audience at the Oasis gig.

Activity 2:

The Blur song released on this day in 1995 was ‘Country house’ – listen to the song here. Design an imaginary big grand country house and garden for yourself. How many doors and windows would you have? Would you have turrets? Would you have big lawns? Water features? Animals? Stables? Flower beds? Statues? Vegetables? Room for your posh car (or two!)?

Activity 3:

Oasis and Blur were both competing to get to number 1 in the charts. Which is your favourite of the 2 songs? Who do you think went to number 1? Make banners of support for your winning side of the  battle.

Sing a song that you think you’d get to number 1 in the charts with. Make your own music video for it!

 

 

Why not take photos of any of the activities you’ve tried this week and share them with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Daily activities 96-100: Famous Scientists

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People – Famous Scientists

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here. This week’s features scientist Ada Lovelace and her cat!

 

Activities for the week:

 

Monday 3rd Aug

Daily Activity 96: Marie Curie

Fact of the day:

Marie Curie was born in 1867 and is best known for her work in radioactivity.

Activity 1:

When World War I started Marie Curie learned that doctors could use X-rays to help determine what was wrong with an injured soldier. X-rays allow us to see ‘inside’ bodies to view organs such as bones, using a mild type of radiation. However, there weren’t enough X-ray machines for every hospital to have one. She came up with a mobile X-ray machines and helped to train people to run the machines. The mobile x ray trucks became known as petites Curies, meaning “little Curies” and are thought to have helped over 1 million soldiers during the war.

Can you learn about all of the bones in the body?

Try out a skeleton dance.

Place stickers/post it notes on your body where you think you’ll find these bones: skull, rib, pelvis, femur, tibia, humerus. Were you right – check here for the answers.

Can you create a rhyme or a song to remember the names of the bones – what is the largest? What is the smallest?

Activity 2:

Make a body full of bones art work or model. You could use cotton buds or toothpicks & Plasticine.

Activity 3:

Marie discovered radium and polonium. These two substances are radioactive. Marie named one of the elements polonium after her homeland Poland. She named the other radium, because it gave off such strong rays. Marie came up with the term “radioactivity” to describe elements that emitted strong rays.

For her discoveries, Marie won the Nobel prize for physics and for chemistry. The Nobel Prize is an award given to someone who does something clever and kind that helps other people. Could you make a medal for someone in your life who has helped you through Lockdown?

 

 

Tuesday 4th Aug

Daily Activity 97: Galileo Galilei

Fact of the day:

Italian scientist Galileo was best known for his study of the planets and stars and was known to some as the ‘Father of Astronomy’.

Activity 1:

Galileo made many discoveries using his telescope including finding the four large moons around Jupiter and learning that the Earth’s Moon was not smooth but was covered with craters.

Explore your house and find different textures of surfaces, can you find different smooth and rough surfaces.

Make some moon craters using flour, cocoa and rocks.

Activity 2:

Through his telescope, Galileo also discovered sunspots.

Make a telescope, you could either use a kitchen roll tube, or make one from paper. Draw 10 pictures of the sun to hide around your room – see how many of them you can spot through your telescope.

Activity 3:

Galileo famously conducted experiments that involved dropping heavy and light objects from the top of the leaning tower of Pisa to measure the speed of their fall. His experiments concluded that object fall at the same speed regardless of if they’re light or heavy.

Try making your own leaning towers. See how tall you can make a tower from lego/stacked books/stacked boxes/stacked cotton reels/stacked biscuits/etc before it starts to lean (and eventually fall).

Add on Activity:

For more outer space activities, look back at the Daily Activities #6-10 from when we looked at Mysterious Places: Stars & Planets.

 

 

Wednesday 5th Aug

Daily Activity 98: Archimedes

Fact of the day:

Archimedes was an ancient Greek scientist, inventor, astronomer, and mathematician!

Activity 1:

When Archimedes was at the public baths, he discovered that the more his body sank into the bath water, the more water splashed over the sides. This splashed, ‘displaced’ water was the exact measure of the volume of his body.

In a jug of water filled to the very top plop or push different sized and weighted items (you might want to do this inside a washing up bowl to catch the overspill!) – which items cause the most water to leave the cup? Does a ping pong ball displace more water than a tomato? Does a cup displace more water than an apple?

Archimedes supposedly shouted ‘Eureka’ upon discovering the science behind water displacement. Come up with your own scientific exclamation to show that you’re a genius too! You could write down your exclamation on catch phrase and decorate it.

Activity 2:

Have more fun with water experiments:

Make a tinfoil bowl of saucer shape to act as a boat – how much (what volume) of water can you fill the boat with before it sinks.

If you had the same volume of tin foil as you did with water, and you scrunched the tinfoil into a ball would that sink on the surface of the water?

Why not if they weigh the same?!

Activity 3:

Archimedes invented the Archimedes Screw, a simple machine for moving water uphill that is still used today.

Try and move like a corkscrew – spinning, twisting and rotating. Try doing your body, arm, or leg corkscrew actions in time to this or this song.

 

 

Thursday 6th August

Daily Activity 99: Alexander Graham Bell

Fact of the day:

In 1876, Scottish-born American inventor Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone.

Activity 1:

On 10 March 1876, Alexander Graham Bell made history with the first ever words spoken on the telephone, when he said to his assistant Thomas Watson: “Mr Watson, come here—I want to see you”. What would you have said if you’d just invented the telephone?

Alexander Graham Bell proposed ‘ahoy’ as a standard phone greeting before Thomas Edison popularised the use of ‘hello’, which has stuck up to today. What other greetings could you use on the telephone? Do you know any greetings, or how to say ‘hello’ in other languages?

Act out your greetings in your best Scottish accents, or write your greetings down and decorate them.

Activity 2

As well as being an inventor, Alexander Graham Bell was taught students who were deaf. Come up with dance moves to these phone related songs; you could add in the Makaton/BSL sign for ‘phone’ every time you hear the word ‘phone’ or ‘telephone’ in the songs by ABBA, Blondie, Lady Gaga. Or, try out the Makaton signs to this song: One Call Away.

Activity 3

As well as it being Alexander’s surname, when people say “I’ll give you a bell” they mean “I’ll call you” on the phone. The bell refers to the bell sound old phones used to make to announce a call – similar to a doorbell or a school bell.

Watch this video by James and make your own bell sounds in time with him, alongside some pen drumming.

 

 

Friday 7th August

Daily Activity 100: Isaac Newton

Fact of the day:

Sir Isaac Newton was a British scientist who did lots of work on physics and gravity. Albert Einstein once said that Isaac Newton was the smartest person that ever lived.

Activity 1:

Isaac Newton is famous for discovering the theory of gravity. Legend has it that Newton got his inspiration for gravity when he saw an apple fall from a tree on his farm which bumped him on the head. Try balancing objects on your head and moving – you could try balancing an apple, or start with something easier like a paperback book! Try dancing to this song without dropping your apple or book!

Activity 2:

Try doing some gravity experiments – can you balance a craft stick on a chopstick or pencil like this?

Can you use gravity to make a line of wet paint dripple down a piece of paper if you hold up at a right angle? Can you use gravity to drip paint from a brush onto a piece of paper below you on the floor, like Jackson Pollock?

Activity 3:

Imagine there was no gravity, like in space. Try out some zero-gravity giant step moon walking or act out floating about in space (you could even make yourself a kitchen-foil space helmet or space boots) while dancing to this song.

Activity 4:

By looking at old paintings of him , Newton had incredible hair! Make yourself the best wig you can out of fabric, wool, etc, and dress up as Newton!

 

 

Add on activities this week:

Look back at Daily Activity 49 when we learned all about scientist Ada Lovelace.

 

Why not take a photo of any of the activities you’ve tied this week and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Daily activity 95: Nature & Creativity

This week’s theme:

HYDE PARK SOURCE TAKEOVER – Nature Nearest You.

Fact of the day:

Green, (the mixture of blue and yellow), can be seen everywhere in nature and in many different shades. The human eye sees the colour green better than any other colour.

Resources list:

Scissors, vase or big jug to fill with water (you can also use a big pop bottle with the top cut off), garden gloves for picking any more prickly plants. Paper, pen or pencil, colouring pencils.

 

Our Daily Activities this week have been created by our friends at Hyde Park Source

 

Activity1:

Read, or ask somebody to read you This Fact Sheet about how natural colour and texture appears in art.

Activity 2:

Make a Sensory Bouquet! Watch the video with Claire below to make one along with her.

Go outside into your garden or local park or wild area and gather as many different types of flowers, grasses, seed heads and interesting leaves that you can find! Pick ones with quite long stems so they can go in your vase or jug nicely.

Remember to think about some of different shapes, textures, colours and smells we have talked about this week. Pick herbs like mint or rosemary for strong smell, long or dry grasses for soft airy texture, bright tall flowers for colour and even some prickly plants like thistle if you are careful and use gloves and scissors. Choose different shaped leaves some long, some rounder or some feathery and choose both green and brown coloured stalks.

Fill your vase with water and then arrange all your flowers and plants inside to look as beautiful as possible!

Activity 3:

Try exploring the ideas, feelings and words that come to mind after experiencing the natural world and all the different activities we’ve tried this week. Think about the fresh smell of herbs or the scent of flowers, the sound and different touch of grasses and plants we have looked at, new tastes – bitter or sweet. Sounds of the garden, the buzzing of insects, sound of birdsong or the bright colours of flowers. Think about new discoveries or things that you have particularly liked or found interesting this week might give you some ideas for writing down some words, feelings or rhymes on paper.

Create a Nature Poem using your senses, and experiment with words and poetry inspired by the nature around you. Using your senses, fill in the blanks here to make your very own nature poem. You can also ask someone else and make a poem for them too! Use your colouring pencils to draw the things you, see, hear, touch, taste, smell and feel.

Try writing a Nature Acrostic Poem using the different letters from the word ‘nature’. Use your colouring pencils to draw the things you, see, hear, touch, taste, smell and feel.

Activity 4

Watch this short butterfly video that captures a surprise moment of beauty – it may help you feel relaxed and mindful for a moment, or may give you inspiration for your poems.

 

Why not take a photo of you completing today’s daily activities and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

All photos and videos have been taken by Claire Doble at Hyde Park Source. Thanks for everything this week, Claire!

Daily activity 94: Sow, grow and care for your own plant, and take a herb cutting

This week’s theme:

HYDE PARK SOURCE TAKEOVER  – Nature Nearest You.

Fact of the day:

Germination is the process by which a plant starts to grow from a seed.

Resources list:

Any seed you have in the house – dried peas or beans, seeds squeezed out of a tomato or inside a pepper from your fridge etc. Spice seeds like coriander or fennel you or a friend may have on the shelf. Or even try lemon or orange pips! Some pieces of mint from the garden or a living packet of mint from the supermarket or some stems of the herb rosemary. Small amount of compost and old yoghurt pots or paper cup. Old clear plastic fruit or a brown plastic mushroom carton. Compost, Scissors, some water to water your seeds at the end.

 

Our Daily Activities this week have been created by our friends at Hyde Park Source.

 

Activity1:

Read, or ask somebody to read you This Fact Sheet about seeds and germination.

Activity 2:

Planting a seed.

 

Watch the first half of the video above to guide you.

First prepare your seeds. If you are going to try collecting the seed from the tomatoes or peppers in your fridge, do this a couple of days before you want to plant your seed.

Cut your pepper in half and scoop out the middle core part with all the white seeds attached. Pull just a few of the seeds of this core and place on a plate to dry out for a couple of days. With a tomato, cut just a small slit in the side of cherry tomato and squeeze out the seeds, or with a big tomato cut it in half and scoop out a few seeds which will be covered in wet tomato goo! Try to get less of the goo and more of the seeds if possible but just place your few seeds on a piece of kitchen paper and put on the window sill to dry out for a few days.

When your tomato or pepper seed is nice and dry, about 2 days later, find an old yoghurt pot or paper cup or that type of clear plastic container you can buy strawberries or mushrooms in and reuse it as a growing container.

Fill your container about ¾ full with compost – watch how in the video.

Then sprinkle just a few of your seeds on top of the soil and very gently press your hand down on the seed so it touches the surface of the compost properly. Then sprinkle about 1cm of soil on top of the seeds to just cover them up. Make sure not to bury them too deep!

Try the same method with dried peas or coriander seed in any spare containers you have. Then give the soil a gentle water but for about 10 seconds to properly wet the soil.

Place your container or pot on an indoor windowsill somewhere not too hot but not too cold.

Water your seeds every other day and try to keep the soil/compost nicely moist but not soaked. But do not let them dry out totally either! As the dry seed you planted needs to absorb the water to be able to burst into life.

Peas should start to show green shoots within a week to 10 days and same with the tomatoes. The peppers will take a lot longer to pop though – perhaps 3-4 weeks. Orange and lemon pips are a little bit harder but fun to try anyway to grow a small citrus plant.

When your plant gets bigger after about a month transfer it into a bigger container as it grows.

Good luck growing your seed!

Activity 3:

Take a herb cutting to make a brand new plant of your own!

 

Watch the second half of the video above carefully to guide you in this activity.

Taking a cutting is when we make extra plants from one we already have, and when we get a plant stem or stalk to grow and develop some brand new roots just by placing the cut stem in some soil or water for a while. Most herbs are very good plants to try to make your first cutting with, as they are fast and strong growers.

Get your longish pieces of mint or rosemary which are both lovely smelling herbs you can use in cooking or to make a refreshing herbal tea.

Make sure the bottom of the herb stem has a nice straight cut where you cut it from the bigger plant or trim the very bottom part off with scissors – so you don’t have a ragged rough end.

Carefully take off most of the bottom leaves with your fingers to just leave a few green leaves at the very top of your stem, and so revealing a nice long amount of bare stalk without leaves.

Fill a container like a plant pot, yoghurt pot or a tall paper coffee cup with compost. Remember to make a few small holes in the bottom so the water can drain out.

Take your now half bare herb stems and poke them right down into the compost so that the whole stem is deep in the soil, just leaving the couple of top leaves you left on the top part poking out. Try to poke them around the very edges of your pot/paper cup – you can probably fit about 2-3 cuttings around the edge in one medium pot.

Having the stems pushed down quite deep under the soil is important and will encourage strong new roots to develop out of the bare stem that is now mostly hidden under the soil.

Water your cuttings well and place on an indoor windowsill somewhere cool inside – ie not above a hot radiator!

Keep watered every other day and nice and moist and wait about 3 weeks to see the mint or rosemary start to gradually develop new leaves.

When you see this you know that your new herb cutting has now grown its own root system under that soil, and so become a brand new plant that can be planted back outside in a bigger pot or border to develop into a full size plant over time.

And all from a bit of bare stalk!!

 

  

Why not take a photo of you completing today’s daily activities and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

All photos have been taken by Claire Doble at Hyde Park Source. Thanks Claire!

Daily activity 93: Wild food, edible flowers and the power of taste!

This week’s theme:

HYDE PARK SOURCE TAKEOVER – Nature Nearest You.

Fact of the day:

Gathering wild leaves or food such as berries or nuts from green spaces (verges, fields, parks or hedgerows) is really fun and is called foraging.

Resources list:

Plastic bag to collect wild leaves and flowers you find. Bag of bought salad leaves or lettuce you have in the fridge. Any of or some of these: radish, celery, apples, tomatoes, cucumber, red onion (bought from shop or home grown –  it doesn’t matter, just whatever you have in or available!) Pick edible wild leaves and flower petals you can definitely identify. Bottle of clear lemonade, pack of strawberries, half a cucumber, good handful of fresh mint leaves or lemon balm leaves. Jug or big glass. Ice cubes only if you have any in the freezer.

 

Our Daily Activities this week have been created by our friends at Hyde Park Source

 

Activity 1:

Read, or ask somebody to read you this Fact Sheet about foraging for wild food and edible flowers.

Activity 2:

Make a wild colour salad!

 

Tips for ingredients to use for salad –

Flowers you can eat and for colour: Borage (blue), Marigold (orange), Rose (pink), Nasturtium (orange or yellow), Chive flower (purple)

Wild or garden leaves to pick: Dandelion, Sorrel, Garlic Mustard, Nasturtium, Sedum, Mizuna, Chicory

Salad leaves from garden or shop to use: Rocket, Lettuce, Spinach, Watercress

Add in for crunch and texture: cherry tomatoes, radish, cucumber, celery, apple.

 

Instructions:

Check what salad you already have in your fridge like lettuce, tomatoes, radish, celery etc plus an apple if you have one.

Pop into your garden or to a local green space where it is a bit wilder. You may have noticed dandelions growing there before and definitely recognise their leaves so pick a few dandelion leaves if you can.

If you have any herbs like mint, parsley or chives pick a few of those too.

See the tips list of things you can try and watch the video to get an idea.

Wash your all your leaves and flower petals gently first in cold water and shake a bit to dry. Place the leaves in a large bowl first and mix them up a bit.

After chopping them smaller – add in your crunchy stuff like radish, red onion, celery, apple. Notice all the different colours as you add them in. Add in chopped up tomato if you have any and this is nice to add red colour too.

Mix all this together gently.

Finally add the edible flower petals on top to decorate – just sprinkle on the orange marigold and rose petals and place the whole spicy nasturtium flowers on top for beauty.

Admire your Rainbow Salad and how much more fun to eat it looks than a plain green normal salad!

If you want to add a dressing – mix up 3tbsp olive oil, 2 tbsp cider vinegar, 1 tspn mustard, half tspn honey and drizzle on.

Activity 3:

Make a tasty and very fruity pink summery drink!

Instructions:

Chop up a few strawberries (at least 5 or 6) into halves or quarters if they are big and put in bottom of a big jug or your glass. Chop up a third of cucumber up into 1cm cubes and put in the jug on top of the strawberries.

Wash your mint or lemon balm leaves, then tear them up a bit smaller (they will smell amazing when you do this!) and drop into your jug on top of the strawberries.

Now pour the lemonade all over your strawbs, cucumber and mint leaves! Stir gently and leave for 20mins or more for the flavours and colour to spread.

Hey presto! You have a beautiful pink summer drink that smells gorgeous too!

Pour a glass, add ice if you want and enjoy drinking yourself or share with a friend.

Cheers!

 

 

Why not take a photo of you completing today’s daily activities and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

All photos taken by Claire at Hyde Park Source!

Daily activity 92: Summer Flowers and Plants – a vivid world of colour, texture and shape.

This week’s theme:

HYDE PARK SOURCE TAKEOVER – Nature Nearest You.

Fact of the day:

All the amazing bright and bold colours and shapes you see in the plants around you (in both their leaves and flowers) have a purpose.

Resources list: Scrap piece of plain white or cream cotton type material/cloth (or plain white paper if you have no cloth), Masking tape if you have it, collected colourful flowers, leaves or even berries if you see any. Tips for flowers to collect: yellow buttercups, green dandelion leaves and yellow flowers, pink rose petals, pansies or violas, flowers with lots of dusty yellow pollen inside. Any early blackberries. Softer leaves are better to make green colour with. Any stronger coloured flowers you see and try to get a variety of leaves and flowers. Only if you have them – Coffee granules, ground spices like yellow turmeric or red paprika powder.

 

Our Daily Activities this week have been created by our friends at Hyde Park Source

 

Activity 1:

Read, or ask somebody to read you This Fact Sheet about the purpose of the incredible bright and bold colours and shapes we see in the plants around us.

Activity 2:

Explore Touch and texture in your outside space. Find grasses and plants with different feels, shapes and textures.

 

Go outside into your nearest bit of wild green space whether that is your garden, backyard or park nearby. See what different plants, flowers or seeds with different types of shapes and textures you can find?

Try looking for long grasses with seeds or fluffy tops, feathery looking leaves, or delicate petals to see how they feel against your fingers? Notice any stronger sharper looking shaped plants as well – like tall thistles or prickly roses but be very careful if you want gently touch them as they can be spikey!

How do you feel when you touch the soft plants, what words would you use to describe it? What did you think of the more spikey plants – were they fun to look at or a bit strange?

Are there any tiny low down hidden plants hiding amongst the longer grass? Did you notice any dry seed heads with unusual shapes or other colourful or interesting looking plants?

Activity 3:

Make your own beautiful colour print rubbing on cloth from the natural colour and dye found in fresh flowers petals, pollen and leaves.

 

Instructions:

Go outside to collect your different leaves and flowers.

Try collecting ones like green dandelion leaves and dandelion flowers, yellow buttercup flowers, pink rose petals, pansies or anything with a strong colour you see. Make sure there are lots of the flowers to pick before you take many!

Collect softer wetter different types of green leaves to make different shades of green marks on your cloth. Try to find flowers you see with a lot of dusty yellow pollen inside as they are good to make stronger yellow colours.

Get your piece of plain white or cream cloth – a square about 20cm square would perfect.

You can use part of an old t-shirt, tea towel or any old white material you have around the house. Slightly thicker material tends to work better but give it a try whatever you have – even plain paper if you have no cloth.

If you have masking tape, tear or cut off different small pieces to stick down onto the cloth and create the first letter of your first name. Or an easy letter to make is a big letter ‘A’. Make sure you stick the tape down properly and smooth it down properly onto the cloth.

Once you have made your letter out of masking tape, pick up a small handful of some of your collected leaves to make first green and then different colour flower petals to make pink or yellow and use them to rub onto the cloth making coloured marks, smudges and shapes!

You need to rub quite hard to get the colour to appear on the cloth. Rub harder and you get darker colour rub lighter and it will be paler.

Smudge colour all over your square and all over the masking tape you stuck down. Experiment in different areas by making different marks, and maybe leave a few areas plain white too. But be as free as you like – it’s your piece of art!

Extra task – If you want, have a go at also using a few kitchen powdered spices like paprika or turmeric or good old coffee granules mixed with a tiny bit of water in a bowl to make darker stronger colours. But be careful as these are a lot darker than the colour from the natural flowers so use them sparingly!

Finally – when you have finished making colours, peel off the masking tape from the cloth bit by bit to reveal your beautiful capital letter in white hidden underneath your colours!

Stick your colour art up on your wall or hang it up on a hook by attaching or stapling some ribbon across the top.

 

 

Why not take a photo of you completing today’s daily activities and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

All photographs have been taken by Claire at Hyde Park Source!

Daily activity 91: Insects and the buzzing, humming minibeast world!

This week’s theme:

HYDE PARK SOURCE TAKEOVER – Nature Nearest You.

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here. https://purplepatcharts.org/colouring-pages/

Fact of the day:

All of our gardens put together make up more of Britain’s green space than all of the nature reserves combined!

Resources list:

Old bedsheet, washing line, a torch, clothes pegs, outside wall space, hooks; Hollow dry sticks of all different sizes, some normal sticks, pair of old socks, scissors, string or wool to hang your bug hotel up.

 

Our Daily Activities this week have been created by our friends at Hyde Park Source. Watch the video below to meet Claire who will be sharing activities with us all week!

Activity 1:

Read, or ask somebody to read you the information from this Fact Sheet all about the bugs and insects around us.

Activity 2:

Make a glowing moth trap to attract and identify moths!

You can easily sit outdoors in the day and enjoy the butterflies and bees but there is one other type of insect that mainly comes out when you go to sleep – Moths!

We love moths with their shapes, colours, fancy names and amazing life-cycles, all the tiny yet completely beautiful details you notice when you take a closer look at them. Some are spotty, stripy, speckly – some shimmer with colour, others are patterned or camouflaged so they can hide safely amongst the plants.

Only thing with moths is that many hide away during the day. But there is an easy way to find out what kind of moths come out when the sun goes down: make a moth trap!

Instructions:

No moths get hurt in this activity – it simply means attracting moths to a light source so you can take a closer look at them. I guarantee you will be fascinated by the beautiful moths living right outside your house!

To create a simple moth trap in a matter of minutes, all you need is a white sheet and a bright lamp or torch. When it’s dark after 9pm go outside, choose a still warmish evening if possible.

Peg the sheet up onto your washing line or just hang it over some bushes, turn off nearby lights, then switch on your torch and point it at the sheet.

Wait for lots of fascinating moths to come to the sheet! They won’t be able to resist it! See if you can work out what types you see by looking at the above moth chart?

Activity 3:

Make your own Bug Hotel from sticks that you can hang to attract lots of insects and creepie crawlies to hide inside, shelter and make a cosy home.

Instructions:

Gather some normal sticks and also some hollow sticks from outside.

July, August and September is a good time to do this as many plants and flower stems have dried out in sun and so you will find more old dry sticks on the ground or be able to snap some off if they look brown and dead. Look in the messier wilder parts of the park or garden.

Cut or carefully snap your sticks into sections about 20cm long or the width of your hand spread out wide.

When you have a good few pieces ready, hold them all together in your hand to see if they make a nice fat bundle.

Get an old pair of socks that you don’t mind cutting up!

With some good scissors carefully cut the top off the neck of the sock to form a stretchy ring of material, then cut off another ring of material by cutting lower down. Keep working down the sock, cutting rings of material off until you have about 8 stretchy rings of sock material.

Get your sticks, lay them all the same way and bundle them up tight in one hand, then use the sock rings like elastic bands to tie and fix them all together. Be patient as this can take a few minutes to get the sticks nice and tight so they don’t fall out of the sock bands. Tie different stretchy sock rings spread out all along the length of your sticks to hold them together – 4 or 5 bands might be about right.

When secure, add a piece of wool or string to your bug hotel to make a loop so you can hang it up. Go outside and choose where to hang, wedge or place your bug hotel.

A good idea is to hang it or wedge it in a tree, or a hole in wall, or at the back of a garage or shed in a quiet spot.

Check it each day over the next month or so to see if any insects like bees, centipedes, spiders or wood lice have crawled inside to make a home!

Activity 4:

Watch this short video clip we filmed in the garden last week of a red-tailed bumble bee gathering pollen and nectar from a fuchsia flower…


What do you notice about the bee, can you spot how it carries the pollen and nectar it has collected?

 

 

Why not take a photo of you completing today’s daily activities and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

 

All photos were taken by Claire at Hyde Park Source – thanks Claire!

Daily activity 90: Summer around the world

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of… Summer

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

Summer is celebrated in many different festivals all over the world.

Resources list:

Colourful materials; Youtube; Cardboard, scissors; Paper, selotape, pens/colouring materials; Flowers, egg boxes, tissue paper, natural bits and pieces collected from outside.

Activity 1:

Aomori Nebuta Matsuri Festival is a summer festival held in Japan every August. During the festival vibrant lantern floats depicting gods and mythical characters are paraded through the streets. Constructed out of washi, a traditional Japanese handmade paper, the floats take up to one year to construct. As the floats are pushed through the streets, creating a river of colour, the parade is brought to life by groups of taiko drummers and dancers.

Make a river of colour in you room by collecting colourful material from all over your house (clothes/sheets/towels/teatowels) and laying them on the floor in a river shape. You could make paper boats decorated with faces and characters to act as the floats.

Watch this video of taiko drummers, can you drum along in time either using pens or wooden spoons on a tabletop, bucket or washing up bowl, or simply your hands on your thighs.

Activity 2:

Every summer Puck Fair is held in Killorglin, Ireland. The fair gets its name from the Irish word ‘poc,’ which means billy goat, as the event honors a wild goat that acted heroically during a battle in 1600. During the summer festival the people of Killorglin choose one mountain goat each year and crown him “King Puck” for the duration of the festival.

Can you do an impression of a goat. Can you jump about like a goat?

You can watch goats on this webcam live from Wales.

Make a crown (it could look something like this ) and crown somebody for how well they’ve done during lockdown.

Activity 3:

Ghost Festival, China. In China, the seventh lunar month of the Chinese Lunar Calendar (August) is Ghost Month. At this time it’s believed ghosts re-enter the living world. To keep the ghosts satisfied families worship their ancestors by offering sacrifices of food, money and entertainment at Ghost Festival. During the festival  you can see glowing lanterns floating along Chinese rivers. According to Chinese tradition, these lanterns direct the lost ghosts back to their families.

Make a Chinese summer festival lantern like here or here. You could draw ghosts on your paper before cutting the lantern slits!

Activity 4:

With roots in pagan times, Swedish Midsummer is a celebration of the summer solstice, (the longest day of the year), but it is also a celebration of life and love. One central aspect of the celebration is to dance around the midsummer pole, or midsommarstång. Find something in your house, such as a chair, to dance in a circle around in time to this music.

At Swedish Midsummer it’s traditional to wear a flower crown. You could recreate this look by putting real flowers found outside into your hair, perhaps using hair slides. Or, you could make a paper flower crown with egg box flowers, tissue paper flowers, or your own drawn flowers. Or, you could tape natural objects to your headband.

Daily activity 89: Summer Poems

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of… Summer

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

In 2012 a sunflower in Germany made it into the Guinness World Records for being the tallest sunflower ever at 8.23 m (27 ft)!

Resources list:

Poems; lemon, ice, water, sugar; Watercolour paints/food colouring, baking soda/bicarb of soda, paper, brushes, vinegar, spoon or dropper;  Paper, colouring and drawing materials; Yellow objects; Paint fork, pasta twists, paper; Youtube.

Activity 1:

Read, or ask somebody to read this summer poem to you, all about Lemonade.

Act out and make noises for the words ‘Drinking’, ‘Slurping’, ‘Gulping’, ‘Sipping’, ‘Splashing’, and Pouring’. What drinks would you sip, and which would you gulp – try the different actions with a drink in your hand.

Make your own still lemonade from the ingredients in the poem: lemon, ice, sugar, water. Does it have a sweet or a bitter taste?

Make some fizzing lemonade artwork – mix up some fizzing paint by adding a tablespoon of baking soda to a cup or bowl (use different cups for each different colour you’d like to make). Add just enough liquid watercolor or diluted food colouring to cover the baking soda. Stir well.  The paint should have a very thick paste-like consistency.  If it is too runny, add more baking soda; if it is too thick, add more liquid watercolour or diluted food colouring.  Paint your picture and then move it onto a tray with an edge to contain any overflowing liquid! Add drops of add vinegar to your paint and watch it fizz like a glass of fizzy lemonade!

Activity 2:

Read, or ask somebody to read you this Summer acrostic poem.

Create your own poem using the letters of ‘Summer’. Or, draw and decorate the words that feature in the poem. Share your poems with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

Read, or ask somebody to read to you this Sunflower poem.

Being in natural light can be good for our mental health and help to brighten our mood. Root your feet to the floor and bend and stretch your body towards the light (this could be the nearest window) show your face to the sun!

Bright sunshiney yellow is also a colour that can help to brighten our mood. Have a hunt all over your house to find the most cheerful yellow objects that you can find. Lay them all out on a tabletop to fill it all up, and create what could look like a field of yellow sunflowers.

Try making a piece of sunflower art work using paint and a kitchen fork or uncooked pasta twists!

The centre of a sunflower is very special. Each and every sunflower in the whole world features a pattern of interconnecting spirals! Normally there are 34 spirals in one direction and 55 in the other. Very large sunflowers can have 89 in one direction and 144 in the other. Try drawing spirals, walking in spirals, and tracing spirals with your fingers listening to this song.

Activity 4:

Make a poem about your senses: In summer I hear … In summer I see … In summer I smell … In summer I taste … In summer I touch … In summer I hear … In summer I feel …

Come up with actions for each of the things you hear/feel/see etc. Could you collect any of the things you mention in your poem and make a table-top display of summery items, or you could draw them. Share your poems and art work with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 5:

Can you make a song out of any of the words of the poems above that you could dance, play an instrument or body percussion along to?

Daily activity 88: Summer Sports

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of… Summer

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

The first Wimbledon championship took place in 1877, making it the oldest tennis tournament in the world.

Resources list:

Balloons, string, paper plate, stick/pencil; Youtube; Strawberries and cream; Thick card, scissors, or wooden rolling pin, kitchen foil, toilet roll tubes; Watercolour paints, brushes, paint, salt; Ball, ribbon or scarf.

Activity 1:

Imagine you’re at Wimbledon and try a game of balloon tennis – keep the balloon up in the air, rallying it back and forth between you and a partner if you have somebody you could play with, or keep it up batting up in the air without dropping it for as long as you can, if playing solo. If you’re playing with a partner, you could tie a piece of string between the backs of two chairs to create the top of your net to pass the balloon across to each other. You could use your hand as a tennis racket, or make a racket from a paper plate with a stick or pencil taped to it for the handle.

Practice your forehand (batting with your palm facing your opponent) and backhand (batting with the back of your hand facing your opponent) tennis moves.

Try playing a game while listening to the Wimbledon theme music!

If you have them, finish your game off with a traditional bowl of Strawberries & Cream!

Activity 2:

Cricket is another sport traditionally played over Summer. Try playing a game – make yourself a cricket bat (from thick card cut into the shape of a cricket bat, or improvised from a wooden rolling pin), with a scrunched up kitchen foil or newspaper ball, and wickets made from toilet roll tubes, can you hit the ball and run lengths of your room before somebody topples your wickets?

Activity 3:

Listen to the cricket theme tune and join in with some simple percussion. You could then try some more advanced body percussion to try making some catchy beats of your own.

Activity 4:

Beach and sea sports are perfect for summer time. Test out your best swimming and surfing moves to this song.

There would be lots of salty seaspray on your surfboard. Try watercolour painting using salt and see what effects you can create, like this.

Activity 5:

Every 4 years, the Summer Olympics are held at a different city in the world. People compete in many different events – how many of the summer disciplines shown here can you act out?

One of the events is rhythmic gymnastics; the gymnasts perform choreographed movements with musical accompaniment using hand apparatus such as rope, hoop, ball, clubs and a ribbon. Can you dance with a ball or a piece of ribbon , (or a long scarf)?

Daily activity 87: Summer traditions and festivities

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of… Summer

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

The tradition of a picnic dates from at least the Middle Ages, when gentlemen out hunting would pause for a lavish meal outdoors.

Resources list:

Youtube, bells, 2 handkerchiefs/tea towles/pillowcases; Picnic food, picnic blanket; Icecube tray, paint, water, freezer, paper.

Activity 1:

Summertime is often a time when we see Morris Dancing. Morris Dancing is a form of English folk dance usually accompanied by music. It is based on rhythmic stepping by a group of dancers, usually wearing bells and holding sticks and handkerchiefs. Find some bells to tie to your legs or shoes, and grab 2 teatowels or pillowcases, and step, clap and jump along with the Morris dancers here.

Activity 2:

Summer is often the time for music festivals. To celebrate, put on a summery outfit and have a dance to some summery songs. Learn the Makaton for ‘Summer’ and do the sign every time you hear the word sung in any of these songs: Summertime Blues, Summertime, Summertime, Summer of 69, Summer in the City, In the Summertime, Summer Nights, Cruel Summer, Cool for the Summer, Boys of Summer.

Activity 3:

Summer is a great time to have a picnic! Pack up your snacks (into a basket if you have one), put down a blanket and take your lunch outside today. (Even if it’s raining outside, have a picnic indoors on a blanket on the floor!) What can you hear and see outside as you eat? What does it smell like? What does the grass under your feet and legs feel like? Does your food taste different outside? How many birds can you spot? Look up at the clouds and see if you can spot any shapes in the clouds.

Activity 4:

The Edinburgh Fringe Festival is held in Scotland every summer and showcases a vast variety of performing arts, including some outstanding street performers.

Try becoming a living statue – dress up and hold yourself still in a statue pose until you can slowly come to life when somebody you live with drops a coin in your box!

Activity 5:

It’s a bit of a tradition in the UK to complain that we’re too hot when the sun comes out! Cool yourself down with some ice painting! Fill an ice cube tray roughly 1/3 of the way with paint, using any colours you like. Fill the ice cube tray the rest of the way with warm water and stir until the paint and water is mixed up. Pop the ice cube tray in the freezer for 4-6 hours, or until the ice has set. Once the paint cubes are frozen they will easily pop out of the ice trays and you can start using them as cooling hand held mark-makers, like icy crayons! Even if you just leave them to melt in the sun they’ll still make some beautiful art!

Daily activity 86: A holiday to the seaside

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of… Summer

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here. This week’s features these summer flowers: sunflowers, crocosmias, cosmos, passion flower and poppy.

Fact of the day:

In the UK no one lives more than 80 miles from the seaside. And the tallest recorded sand castle is 16.68m tall!

Resources list:

Youtube; banana, honey, biscuits, pineapple/apple, grapes; beach outfit and accessories, sand or sugar, pebbles, salt water, sun cream; Sand, soil, cooked rice, beaker/egg cup; Paper and pens; plastic bottle or tub filled with beads, tiny stones, sand, dried peas, lentils, or rice.

Activity 1:

Learn some of the Makaton signs to Summer Holiday

Activity 2:

Get dressed for a visit to the beach, pop on your hat, sunglasses, shorts and tshirts. In your beach bag pop in a beach towel, suncream and an inflatable. Bring a crabbing bucket or a net for the rock pools!

If you have some, dip your toes in some sand (or put your finger tips in a bowl of sugar to feel a similar sensation and sound). If you have some, clink together some pebbles, as if you’re walking towards a rockpool on the beach.

Can you move yourself, or some fabric, like the waves, or the crabs; can you scream like the wind or shriek like a seagull; can you smell or taste some salt water; can you smell some suncream; can you put your hands or feet into some ‘tide’ waters; can you move back and forth like the sea’s tides moving in and out which they do daily; can you beat out a rhythm on your thighs of the in-and-out; can you do slow and steady breathing in and out like the gentle tides, watch here or here; can you add glitter to a jar of water to create sparkling, shimmering sea waters?

Activity 3:

No trip to the beach is complete without Fish & Chips – try making yourself a healthier version… For your fish, peel a banana and spread some honey over it – dip it and cover it in crunched up biscuits. For the chips, use pineapple fingers, or slice an apple into fingers. For your mushy peas, crush up some grapes. Serve it on paper for an authentic seaside experience!

Activity 4:

Try making some ‘sandcastles’ out of different materials (sand, soil, cooked rice/couscous, modelling clay, etc) – try out which ones work best, which ones don’t work very well, and which makes the best ‘sandcastle’. You don’t have to use a bucket, you could try making them with beakers, egg cups, bowls, or just formed with your hands. Make some of your own unique flags to stick in the top, attached to a cocktail stick. Share photos of your best ‘sand’castles with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 5:

Lots of seaside resorts feature architecture and art work from the Art Deco period of the 1902s and 1930s. If you’re interested, you could watch a BBC Iplayer documentary called ‘Art Deco by the sea’ here. Famously, lots of wonderful advertising posters were made for British seaside resorts like this. Create an advertisement poster of your own featuring your favourite seaside resort, to entice people to visit it!

Activity 6:

Play along with ‘I do like to be beside the seaside’ (listen here, or hear the traditional seaside organ version here); using a homemade shaker instrument made from a plastic bottle or tub filled with beads, sand, dried peas, lentils, or rice.

Daily activity 85: The Black Mambas

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People – Inspirational Women pt.2

Fact of the day:

The Black Mambas are wildlife rangers who form South Africa’s first all-female anti-poaching unit.

Resources list:

Rucksack; Toilet roll tubes, selotape; Youtube; Paper, scissors; Plastic milk bottle, scissors, tissue paper, glue, paint; Paper circles, or bun cases, glue.

Activity 1:

The Black Mambas Anti-Poaching Unit is made up of 22 women whose role it is to protect the wildlife in South Africa from poachers. Poachers are people who illegally hunt, capture or kill wild animals such as elephants and rhinos for their tusks and horns. The Black Mambas want to protect these animals.

Find South Africa on a map of the continent of Africa and on a map of The World.

The Black Mambas have learned to live in the Savannah – what would you need to pack in your rucksack for a journey to the Savannah with its hot and dry conditions? Act out your journey through the grasslands of the Savannah, what will you do if you  encounter lions, buffalo and hyenas, where will you find water, where will you find shade and cool down?

Activity 2:

The Black Mambas are the eyes and ears of the wildlife reserves in south Africa. The women have learned to spot camouflaged animal traps, and their anti-poaching strategy includes ‘visual policing’ by observing and close listening when they’re on their daily patrols.

Make binoculars and use your eyes and ears to detect things – what can you see and hear, close and far away, if you stay silent and really concentrate on your listening to your environment? Note down all the different noises you hear.

Listen closely – can you identify these animal noises?

Activity 3:

The Black Mambas monitor Rhinos, as hunting of rhinos for their wonderful horns has increased. The women monitor the rhino daily and design maps showing where the rhino are; this helps them find the high-risk areas of poaching. Rhino activity can be tracked by keeping an eye out for their footprints and evidence of their poo! See if you can match the footprints to the animals here.

Draw round and cut out your own footprint and create a map in your house, placing a footprint along the paths you usually walk, to map your activity. Are you most often found in the kitchen, the garden, or in bed – your footprints will give it away!

Activity 4:

The Black Mambas also protect Elephants from poachers who want their ivory tusks. In the 1980s, up to 80% of elephant herds were lost in some regions. The Black Mamba patrols ensure that elephants are not lost like this.

Create an elephant of your own, using a milk bottle covered in glued on tissue paper, or paper scraps which you can paint any colour when dry.

Can you mimic the trumpeting sounds and movements of an elephant?

Activity 5:

The Black Mambas also protect Pangolins. Pangolins are sometimes known as ‘Scaly Anteaters’ and are shy nocturnal creatures whose body is covered in scales (made from the same material as our fingernails) that acts as armour. Pangolins are often hunted for their scales, so need to be protected.

Create some scaly art work by over laying circle shapes of paper or card (or flattened bun cases) into a tessellated pattern like this.

Activity 6:

The Black Mamba is also a type of snake. Try moving like a snake with slow, slinky, creeping movements. Can you move your arms like wiggling snakes? Can you hiss, and whip your tongue in and out like a snake tasting the air? Can you wind your body from side to side, dancing to this or this song.

Activity 7:

Lorna has drawn a fantastic colouring-in sheet featuring The Black Mambas. Download it here and share your completed sheets with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

Daily activity 84: Isadora Duncan

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People – Inspirational Women pt.2

Fact of the day:

Isadora Duncan (1877-1927) is known as the ‘Mother of Modern Dance’.

Resources list:

Youtube; sheets or flowing cloth.

Activity 1:

As a child Isadora Duncan hated sitting still, she longed to leap, spin and twirl and express the joy of being alive through her body.

Come up with some actions or dance moves that express different emotions. How would you show you were happy, sad, angry, scared, surprised, etc? For example, you might leap about the room for happiness, crouch in a ball for sadness, etc.

Activity 2:

Isadora once said “I want to dance like a wave on the ocean or a tree in the breeze. Natural and free”.

Move your body to show what a wave on the ocean looks like, and what a tree in the breeze looks like. Come up with some other natural things that you could move like (a bird in the sky? A dolphin in the ocean? A crab on the beach, etc)

Activity 3:

Isadora set up her own dance schools for people not to follow her dance moves, but rather to come up with their own dance moves.

Listen to music from different musical genres such as Classical, Reggae, Pop, Country, Dance and Rock & Roll. Does the music make you want to dance in different ways? Come up with your own unique dance moves for each piece of music. You could film your dance routines and share with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 4:

While dancing Isadora wore bare feet and free flowing loose white outfits – she wanted the cloth to echo the flowing movements of her limbs.

Make yourself a dancing outfit from sheets or flowing cloth, you could make a veil, or tuck cloth into your waistband that swishes when you move.

Activity 5:

Isadora believed that “You were wild once, so don’t let them tame you!” She didn’t like the restrictions of classical dance and ballet, and her unique, new, and ‘wild’ style of dancing shocked some people, but she was just being herself. We’re all unique and different and do things in our own ways – it’s what makes us special.

Think of different ways to complete tasks, as we all do them slightly differently and all of those different ways are right. How many different ways can you think of to travel from one side of the room to the other – you could wheel in a wheelchair, sprint, hop, moon-walk, etc – give them all a go. How many different ways can you write your name on a piece of paper? How many different ways can you greet somebody? How many different ways can you draw a flower?

 

Daily activity 83: Hedy Lamarr

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People – Inspirational Women pt.2

Fact of the day:

Hedy Lamarr (1914-2000) was a famous Hollywood actress and an inventor.

Resources list:

Dress up items; card, paper, pens; Red, green, yellow objects, a bag, red and green clothes; drinking straw, paper, selotape; scarf; Youtube; Radio website.

Activity 1:

In her youth, Hedy Lamarr disguised herself as a maid to escape her house in Austria. She travelled to Paris and London where she met an important film producer.

Make yourself a disguise (somebody else’s clothes, hats, gloves, moustache, wig, etc) and see if you can sneak between rooms in your house without being detected.

Activity 2:

Hedy then moved to LA to become a huge film star for the movie studio MGM.

Try roaring like the MGM lion!

Walk the red carpet like a movie star in your finest clothes, wave to the paparazzi!

Hedy was honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960 – make a star for yourself; in the centre of Hedy’s star is a film camera icon to show she was a movie star, what icon will your star show?

Outside the Chinese Theatre in Hollywood some stars have placed their hands and feet in cement (like Marilyn Monroe here); draw around your hands and feet to place next to your star!

Activity 3:

In between making films Hedy was an inventor and developed a new kind of traffic stop light and a capsule that could make sparkling water!

What actions can you come up with for the 3 traffic light colours – red (stop), amber/yellow (get ready), green (go)? Find items in your house that are red, yellow and green. Put them in a bag and pull one out at random – do the action for that colour. Try the other items in your bag!

What’s the funniest, biggest, softest and hardest objects in your house that you can find that are red, yellow and green?

Or, find a green and red item of clothing. Have a game of musical statues using this music. When the music starts, dance wearing your green item of clothing. When the music freezes, swap into your red item of clothing!

Activity 4:

Another of Hedy’s talents was to do with aeroplanes. The modifications she suggested to designers made aeroplanes more efficient.

Try throwing a drinking straw through the air, like an aeroplane. Measure how far it travelled. Now, try some modifications to your aircraft by adding some paper loops – see here for how. How far does it travel now? Try some further modifications like making the straw shorter, changing the size of the loops, adding or taking away loops – how do these things affect the distance your straw can travel?

Activity 5:

Hedy also pioneered the technology that led to our modern day WiFi, GPS, and Bluetooth communication systems. She did this by working out how to change the frequency of the radio waves that war ships used, preventing enemies from communicating.

Make some ‘radio’ waves of your own. With a scarf or long piece of fabric such as a sheet, hold onto one end and either have somebody hold the other end, or tie it to the back of a chair. Waft the scarf to create short ‘high frequency’ waves (fast, big, tall ripples of the fabric), and long ‘low frequency’ waves (small, gentle shallow ripples of the fabric).

Listen to radio stations from around the world – On this website you can spin the globe and see loads of dots. Each of these dots represents a different radio station from all over the world. If you centre the circle over a dot you can hear what that station are playing or saying. You can hear voices in all different languages and some weird and wonderful songs and music! Spend some time zipping across the world one radio station at a time. Can you find any stations that are playing songs you like?

Daily activity 82: Katia Krafft

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People – Inspirational Women pt.2

Fact of the day:

Katia Krafft was a daredevil who was fascinated by active volcanoes. She set out to study them, capturing their beauty with her camera.

Resources list:

Youtube; bicarb of soda, washing up liquid, a drop of food colouring, citrus fruits; kitchen foil; paper, red/orange fabric; dried rice/pea/lentils in a plastic tub; paint, straws.

Activity 1:

Katia Krafft (1942-1991) was a French volcanologists (somebody who studies Volcanoes), she regularly braved boiling hot lava flows and active eruptions. She often went into erupting volcanoes to study them and to take pictures and videos. Watch some footage here.

It took a lot of bravery to get so close to something so dangerous. Practice your power poses to help make you feel brave and courageous.

Activity 2:

It was Katia’s dream not to just look at photos of volcanoes but to see them in person. She wanted to be the first woman to film volcanoes as they were erupting as this had never been done before. She thought there was no sight was more beautiful than a volcano erupting right before her eyes.

Create a mini eruption using the acid in citrus fruit juice, and watch the beautiful bubbly ‘eruption’ like Katia would. You’ll need bicarb of soda, washing up liquid, a drop of food colouring, and try it out with different citrus fruits – lemons, limes, oranges, grapefruits. Record your bubbly, fizzy findings with photos, like Katia would – share them with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

When Katia heard news that a volcano was going to erupt she rushed to it and scrambled to the crater to watch the lava. She wore a protective silver suit and helmet  so that she could withstand the heat from the molten lava (which was more than 1000 degrees hot).

Make your own tinfoil hat and shoe coverings to set off on your expedition to the summit of a volcano!

Activity 4:

Katia’s dream was to ride a boat down a lava flow.

Make a paper boat and with a piece of red/orange cloth (this could be a sheet, tablecloth, scarf, etc) either ask somebody to hold one end while you hold the other, or tie one end to the back of a chair while you hold the other end. Make the fabric bubble and jiggle like a river of molten hot lava. Can you carry your boat from one side of your river to the other using your rippling and flowing river motion.

Activity 5:

Play a game of ‘the floor is lava’. Imagine the floor in your house is made of lava. If you step onto the floor you’ll burn your feet. Create some stepping stones (marked out places on the floor) for you to jump between, making sure you don’t land anywhere else and into the lava! What happens when you move your stepping stones further apart? What if the floor is lava all morning – will you remember not to step into the lava as you go about your day?

Activity 6:

Make yourself a dried rice/pea/lentil shaker in a plastic tub, and play it along in time to this song about Volcanos.

Activity 7:

Make a bubbling lava artwork with straws and watered down red, orange and yellow paint.

 

Daily activity 81: Malala Yousafzai

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People – Inspirational Women pt.2

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

12th July is ‘Malala Day’, a day to celebrate Malala Yousafzai and her activism for the rights and education of girls.

Resources list:

Black paper, selotape, glue, scissors, wool; paper and pens; Youtube; Thick sturdy cardboard, scissors, tin foil; Pen, paper, diary download; Jam jar lid, ribbon or string.

Activity 1:

Malala Yousafzai thought it was really important that everyone had access to education – what is your favourite thing to learn about? Can you set up a teachers desk for the day and write and decorate, draw, or demonstrate some information that you’d like to teach others about? It might be a dance that you know the steps to, or some facts about your favourite animal. Share them with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll share your knowledge with others.

You might even want to make a mini graduation cap to wear!

Activity 2:

Malala is an activist. An activist is a person who campaigns to bring about change. Malala campaigned for the rights of girls to go to school in Pakistan, but other people campaign and protest to save the rainforests; to show that Black Lives Matter; to ask for peace; or to protect endangered animals. These are the things that are important to people. What’s important to you – could you make a protest placard or banner featuring a slogan that’s eye catching? It could be a sign to campaign for Eastenders to come back on TV, it could be a sign calling for people to wash their hands, it could be a sign to remind people to recycle, it could be a sign asking people to be kinder to one another, it could be a sign asking for people to protect the rhinos. Share your campaign signs with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

Malala is from Pakistan which has the second largest mountain in the world K2. This is a very difficult mountain to climb – can you act out your own expedition in your house or garden. Count your steps as you hike to the summit. Don’t forget to drink lots of water! You could listen to some Pakistani pop music on your journey.

Activity 4:

The national sport of Pakistan is Hockey – can you make your own hockey stick and create a table top hockey field with a goal at the end to get your hockey puck through (your puck could be made from kitchen foil).

Activity 5:

Malala wrote a blog called Diary of a Pakistani Schoolgirl, telling people about what her life was like in Pakistan, can you write or draw a diary about your life every day this week? It could document in words and pictures how you felt, what you wore, what you did, what you ate, who you saw. You could try filling in this Purple Diary page.

Activity 6:

For her work Malala won the Nobel Peace Prize. This is an award given to someone who does something clever and kind that helps other people. Could you make a medal for someone in your life who has helped you through Lockdown?

 

Daily activity 80: The Ancient Greek Olympics

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – Ancient Greece

Fact of the day:

The first Greek Olympics were held in the city of Olympia in 776 BC (2,795 years ago)

Resources list:

Green card or paper, glue, scissors; drinking straws, kitchen roll tubes, measuring tape, bowls or buckets; paper plates; toilet roll tube, yellow, orange and red coloured paper; light weights (bean tin, apples, etc); Youtube.

Activity 1:

The Ancient Greeks held many festivals in honour of their gods. To celebrate the god Zeus the first Greek Olympics were held in the city of Olympia in 776 BC and are thought to have inspired our own Olympic Games! The winners of each event were given a wreath of leaves, and when they returned home, they would be given free meals and the best seats in the theatre!

Make a Greek ‘Olive’ Leaf Crown for yourself , it could look like this.

Activity 2:

Events at the Greek’s Olympics included wrestling, boxing, long jump, javelin, discus and chariot racing. But those taking part in the wrestling event had to be the toughest, as there were hardly any rules – and they had to compete naked. Eek!

Try out your javelin skills by seeing how far you can throw a javelin made of a kitchen roll tube or a drinking straw through the air. Get some bowls to use as targets and set up a point system. The closest bowl is worth 5 points, next one was worth 10, then 15, and on until 25. The goal is to see how many points you can collect based on how far you can who could throw the your javelin.

If you join tubes/straws together to make your javelin longer, does it affect the distance the javelin travels? (To secure straws together squeeze the end of one and insert it into the open end of the other. Repeat until all straws are attached. Tape if necessary).

Activity 3:

Try out your discus skills by seeing how far you can throw a paper plate flat through the air. Using a tape measure, measure the distances you can throw your discus from a marked starting line. Make a score board to note your measurements and find out what your gold medal winning distance will be!

Activity 4:

The Olympic flame is a symbol of the Olympic Games; it commemorates the Greek Myth about the theft of fire from Zeus, a Greek god. Every four years, when Zeus was honoured at the original Ancient Greek Olympic Games, additional fires were lit at his temple and that of his wife, Hera. The modern Olympic flame today is ignited at the site where the temple of Hera (in Olympia) used to stand. The flame is carried in torches. Make your own Olympic torch, it could look like this or this this.

Activity 5:

One of the original Olympic events was jumping, a bit like long jump, but from a standing position, without a run up, and while holding weights in the hands. Jumping was always accompanied by flute music!!

Try it out, jump forwards while holding weights such as tins of beans, or apples, in your hands. Swing your arms back and jump forwards as you swing your arms forward. Try and measure your distances as you perfect your technique! What is your gold medal winning best distance? You could find some flute music to listen to online to accompany your activity, or just listen to these great jumping songs. instead!!

 

Daily activity 79: Ancient Greek Mythology

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – Ancient Greece

Fact of the day:

Greek Mythology is the set of folk stories about envious gods, courageous heroes and epic adventures that were originally told by the ancient Greeks.

Resources list:

Paper, pens, magazines, glue; Masking tape; Maze download; Youtube; Bun cases, string, card or paper, scissors, stapler; floaty fabric or outfit; plastic box, plasticine.

Activity 1:

In Greek mythology, the Minotaur is a mythical creature with the head and tail of a bull and the body of a man. The lived at the center of the Labyrinth, which was an elaborate maze. The Minotaur was eventually killed by the hero Theseus.

Make a mishmash creature of your own, either by drawing the body of one animal and the head of an other, or by cutting out images from magazines and collaging weird creatures, such as one with the body of a washing machine, the tail of a horse and the head of a supermodel! Let your imagine run wild!  Share your creatures with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

The story of the Minotaur describes how Theseus found his way through the labyrinth maze after victoriously defeating the Minotaur.

Create a winding path through your house, you could mark it as a path between objects (such as cushions or cloth) laid on the floor, or a path marked by a line of winding masking tape on the floor. Follow the path to find your way to the end.

With a pen or your finger, try finding the line through these mazes.

Activity 3:

It’s believed that the Greek ‘Geranos’ dance was linked to the Minotaur story and the winding path Thesues took through the labyrinth. The dance involves winding from side to side like a serpent in a maze. Practice winding your body like a snake.

Ancient Greek inscriptions mention that the Geranos dance involves people holding torches and dancers carrying garlands. Make a garland (e.g. bun case flowers attached to a long necklace of wool or string) and a lantern (e.g. here or here) to carry, and dance your winding snake dance along to this song.

Activity 4:

In ancient Greek mythology, Sirens were mermaid-like creatures that sang with hypnotic voices that were so enchanting and beautiful that they led sailors, under the Siren’s spell, to crash their boats.

Sirens were believed to look like a combination of women and birds. In early Greek art, Sirens were represented as birds with large women’s heads, bird feathers and scaly feet. Later, they were represented as female figures with the legs of birds, with or without wings, playing a variety of musical instruments, especially harps and lyres.

Draw a Siren based on one, or both of these descriptions. Share your scaly footed Sirens with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 5:

Listen to this or this Siren song. How does the music make you feel? How do you think Sirens danced and moved to this mesmerizing music, can you find a floaty costumes to wear for your slow, gentle siren dance or hand/arm movements?

Activity 6:

In Greek mythology, Poseidon lives in an underwater palace in the sea instead of on Mt. Olympus with the other gods. Poseidon is god of the sea, and his palace on the ocean floor is made of corals and gemstones. In a plastic box create an underwater palace for Poseidon made from items that don’t float (plasticine, etc) for you to then submerge by filling the box with ‘sea’ water. Or, draw what you think Poseidon’s palace looks like.

 

 

Daily activity 78: Mount Olympus

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – Ancient Greece

Fact of the day:

The Greeks believed their gods lived high above Mount Olympus, in a palace in the clouds.

Resources list:

Brown and green cloth, cotton wool; paper/card and pens; cardboard box, elastic bands; bucket of water, pebbles, rice.

Activity 1:

Make a Mount Olympus. On a tabletop, cover something tall with brown/green fabric to create an upright mountain shape. At the top, use cotton wool to create clouds and a palace for the gods to live in. Or, build a Mount Olympus from clay, plasticine, lego, or wet sand. Share them with us our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

There are 12 main Greek Gods and Goddesses. Each of them had responsibilities and functions. Come up with actions for each of them, to act out what they were like, and what they were in charge of. For example, as Poseidon, act out the motion of the sea’s waves, and the power and energy of a wild storm. As Artemis practice your archery and pull back your imaginary bow and arrow. As Hermes, run around your house delivering messages or notes to different people. As Hera, act out a wedding ceremony – make yourself a veil! As Ares, show us your muscles!

Activity 3:

Each of the 12 main Greek Gods and Goddesses have a symbol that is associated with them (doves, lightning bolts, bunch of grapes, etc). Create a big Greek doodle by drawing all of the symbols on a sheet of paper. Share your doodles with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 4:

Ancient Greeks believed that the gods and goddesses gave humans different talents and skills. If you were good at playing music, you would give thanks to the god of music. If you were good at sports, cooking, or learning, you would thank the gods responsible for that. What are your talents and skills? Can you find the God or Goddess that matches? Make and write a thank you card to the God or Goddess!

Activity 5:

One of Apollo’s symbols is the Lyre. The Lyre was a popular instrument at many Ancient Greek festivals, it’s a bit like a small harp and musicians play it by strumming or plucking it. Hear it being played here or here. It was sometimes used to accompany singing or poetry readings. Make a cardboard and elastic band version of a Lyre like here or here.

Activity 6:

Zeus was god of lightning and thunder and Poseidon was God of the seas, water, storms, and hurricanes. Make a soundscape to capture the power of these two Gods. You could:

Slosh water in a bottle, bucket or washing up bowl to make the splashing, pouring and swishing noise of the storm waves; howl like the stormy wind; put some rice/lentils/peas in a Tupperware box and rattle it to sound like the persistent rain crashing down; try wobbling cardboard to sound like thunder, or crashing some pans together and flicking a torch on and off for lightning; drop pebbles in a washing up bowl of water to make the sound of heavy droplets; hold onto your hat and act out getting blown away, or stand in front of a fan; make pattering rain sounds with your hands on your thighs; drop rice onto paper to make rain sounds.

Daily activity 77: Ancient Greek Theatre

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – Ancient Greece

Fact of the day:

Most ancient Greek cities had a theatre – some big enough to hold 15,000 people!

Resources list:

Paper or card, scissors, elastic or stick; colouring pens and paper.

Activity 1:

Thousands of people packed the hillside arena of ancient Athens to watch plays by famous writers like Sophocles, Euripides and Aeschylus. Actors wore masks which showed the audience whether their character was happy or sad. Some of the masks had two sides, so the actor could turn them around to change the mood for each scene. Tragic masks carried pained expressions, while comic masks were smiling.

Make yourself a comedy and tragedy mask, or a double sided cardboard mask on a stick to flip it over.

Activity 2:

Wearing your mask, act out (or come up with actions for) the myth of Demeter and Triptolemus.

Activity 3:

Recently, because people can’t visit theatres at the moment a theatre was filled with houseplants to create an audience!! Create your own fun, alternative audience to perform your Greek myth to!

Activity 4:

In this animation all about Greek Theatre  you can see people cheering and stamping their feet if they thought the act was good, or throwing rotten vegetables if they thought otherwise. Write a list of things that you watch that you’d cheer and stamp your feet for (and then do it!), and list of things you’d throw vegetables at (and then draw the veg!) Share your decorated list with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 5:

Athens was the place to go for plays, the city put on a drama festival called the Dionysia in honour of the god Dionysus. He was the god of the theatre and wine. The festival was a bit like a competition. Judges gave prizes for their favourite tragedy and comedy performances. Make a medal, award, or rosette to award to your favourite things. (e.g. Best film, best song, best pet, best TV show, etc).

Daily activity 76: Ancient Greek civilisations

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – Ancient Greece

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

The first Ancient Greek civilisations were formed nearly 4,000 years ago

Resources list:

Sheet or tablecloth, belt or sting; Youtube; dried rice or peas in a Tupperware box; paper and pens, wax crayon, paint, skewer.

Activity 1:

Can you locate Greece on a map of Europe  and a map of the World? Click on this map to zoom in to see the country much closer.

Activity 2:

Most Ancient Greeks wore a chiton, which was a long T-shirt made from one large piece of cotton. Slaves, however, had to make do with a loincloth (a small strip of cloth wrapped around the waist). From a sheet/tablecloth, (or an over-sized tshirt) and a belt or string, make yourself a long chiton.

Activity 3:

Ancient Greek people started most celebrations with a dance, which also had call and response singing. Try singing along to this call and response song.

Ancient Greeks believed that dance was a way to express joy, and that moving our bodies is a natural desire. Harvesting was a time for dance and the traditional harvest dance involved harvesters striding along, four abreast, singing and lifting their knees high with every step. They carried long objects over their shoulders that have been identified as tools used to separate grain. The lead harvester is a man who shakes a sistrum, (a kind of rattle) and appears to be singing heartily. Try making a shaker of rice or dried peas in a plastic tub, and sing along to your favourite song shaking it and lifting your knees high with every step.

Activity 4:

The Greek alphabet is quite different to the English alphabet. Try writing your name using the red Greek letters here to match the orange English letters. You’ll find that not all English letters have a Greek equivalent.

Can you convert these words from Greek to English?

Activity 5:

Statues of Greek gods and goddesses  were placed inside temples such as the Parthenon, a temple in Athens that was built for the goddess Athena.

Have a game of musical statues, when this music pauses, freeze in a pose like an ancient Greek statue of Athena.

Activity 6:

The ancient Greeks created story vases by decorating them with pictures of their gods, heroes and monsters. Using a print out of this template create a story vase of your own using characters from your life and things that you’ve been doing recently.

In ancient Greece, red and black pottery was very fashionable, so you could colour your urn with red wax crayon, and paint over the top with black paint. Then, (using a bamboo skewer/lolly stick/chopstick/empty ball point pen) scratch your story design onto the urn, revealing the red colour.

Daily activity 75: Back to the Future

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News: This Week in History

Fact of the day:

On 3rd July 1985 ‘Back to the Future’ starring Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd was released.

Resources list:

Bits and pieces from your recycling; Youtube; Pens and paper; Instruments; a box or bottle.

Activity 1:

In the film, inventor, Doc Brown builds a time machine out of a DeLorean car to travel back to 1955.

Using boxes, and items from your recycling, make yourself a scrap and junk time machine filled with lots of different textures, colours, buttons and switches. You could add fairy lights. You could have a dial on the front, made from a circle of card, that you could spin to land on a date that you’ll travel back to. Step behind the machine, turn the dial and act out whooshing and whizzing back in time. What noises and actions will the machine make?

Activity 2:

The film was released in the 1980s. Try out some 1980s dance moves – can you moonwalk backwards like Michael Jackson, Vogue like Madonna, or try any of the dances in this video like the robot, the running man, or the worm?

Activity 3:

In the time machine, Marty and Doc travel back in time 30 years to 1955. In the 1950s futuristic looking designs were cool, and ‘atomic’ or ‘starburst’ designs featured on wallpaper and fabrics.

On paper, try drawing your own 1950s sunburst wallpaper pattern. Share your designs with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 4:

In the film, Marty McFly rides a Skateboard. Take a ride on an imaginary skateboard around your room – learn some hints from this video on how to jump on, put your best foot forwards, push off with your back foot, move your feet straight and sideways, and do some tricks like bunny hops, stretch your arms out for balance.

Skateboarding takes balance – try moving around on your imaginary skateboard while balancing something light on your head.  Can you keep it balanced on there while dancing to this song?

Activity 5:

At the start of the film, Marty McFly is appearing in a Battle of the Bands competition. Get out your air guitars, any instruments you have at home, percussion shakers, and pen drumming on a table to play along with your own version of the theme tune to the film, ‘The Power of Love’.

Activity 6:

A time capsule is a container that holds present day items, such as photos, newspapers, letters and more. It’s typically hidden away for somebody in the future to open.

What items would you put in a time capsule that would teach people in the future all about what 2020 was like? You could put them into a box, or seal them in a decorated bottle.

You could write notes telling who you are, and describing your life or your week, or what lockdown has been like; you could draw pictures of your life and the things and people in it; you could write a letter to yourself in 30 years time; you could take photos of things that you see; you could write predictions about what you think the future will be like; you could write out the lyrics to your favourite song; you could write a poem about 2020; you could draw your family tree; you could gather items of packaging, newspaper or magazine clippings, something specific to your neighbourhood, or print outs of websites to put in your time capsule. You could do a questionnaire with everybody that you live with and write down their answers to questions such as what do you think you’ll be doing in 3 years, what’s your favourite songs, films, and food, etc.

Activity 7:

Our Programme Leader, Lorna has drawn an amazing Back to the Future colouring in sheet; why not print one out and try colouring in a DeLorean!

 

Daily activity 74: Peter Kay

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News: This Week in History

Fact of the day:

On 2nd July 1973 British comedian Peter Kay was born.

Resources list:

Carboard boxes, fairy lights; Biscuits and a warm cup of tea; pens and paper; Youtube; ‘Air Guitar’;

Activity 1:

One of Peter Kay’s comedy tours took place at the top of Blackpool Tower. Make your own pointy tower. It could be one made from lego, clay, or a toilet roll tube. Or, you could use card and boxes from your recycling to make a tower – can you build one as tall as you? If you have any fairy lights, you could wrap them around your tower like the Blackpool Illuminations! Pop a Union Jack flag at the very top too! Why not take a photo and share your towers with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

Peter Kay has a sketch where he talks about which biscuits are good dunkers for a cup of tea. Set up a very scientific experiment to test which biscuits in your cupboard make the best dunkers – how many dunks can you do with each biscuit? Create a scoreboard to note your results, and draw the winning biscuits! Let us know you results on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

On one of his tours, Peter Kay played air guitar on a shovel! Find something in your house that you could play air guitar on (broom, bat, or go without and play the genuine air guitar) Air guitar along to some classic Guns N Roses.

Activity 4:

Tell us your best joke! Or give us your best Peter Kay impression! You can share them on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 5:

Get your steps in for the day and march along to ‘Is This the Way to Amarillo’. Recreate the video, count your steps, and add in claps and actions for ‘hug’ ‘pillow’ ‘dream’ ‘willow’ and ‘ringing’!

Activity 6:

On the sitcom, ‘Phoenix Nights’ Peter Kay’s character auditions people to perform at his nightclub. Get dressed up in fancy dress and take to ‘the stage’ in your house to perform your best act – it could be a song, a dance, karaoke, jokes, instrument playing, or any other talent you have (do we know any secret jugglers, magicians, or acrobats?!)

Activity 7:

On his TV show ‘The Services’, Peter Kay played a local DJ for the local radio station Chorley FM. On his show ‘Car Share’ the radio DJ always features in the background. Imagine being a DJ, and pick 5-10 songs that you could put onto a playlist. Make yourself a playlist of these favourite songs on youtube, spotify, or itunes. Or, if you have a large CD collection, line up the some songs to play, you could even introduce them like a DJ and make up with a jingle for your radio show.

Add on Activity:

If you have the ingredients, make garlic bread or cheesecake, like in Peter Kay’s famous jokes.

 

 

Daily activity 73: Debbie Harry

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News: This Week in History

Fact of the day:

On July 1st 1945 Deborah Harry (lead singer of Blondie) was born.

Resources list:

Debbie dress up download; toilet roll tube, foil ball; Youtube; Costumes; Phone; Pens, paper, crayons; colourful fabrics; straight edge or ruler.

Activity 1:

Debbie Harry is well known as a style icon. Download this page, and design a crazy stage outfit for Debbie to wear. Or, collage images from magazines to create a stylish outfit for her! Don’t forget her shoes, hat, sunglasses, and anything else you think she’ll need. Share your Debbies with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

Make yourself a microphone, put on your best rock star costume and imagine you’re on stage in the infamous New York CBGB club, people are cheering for you, people are applauding, there’s a spotlight just on you, the band kick in behind you as you take to the microphone. Perform a karaoke Blondie song here, or here, or here as if you were Debbie Harry!

Activity 3:

Don’t leave people hanging on the telephone! Call a friend or family member today to find out how they are and to let them know what you’re doing. How does hearing them make you feel?

Activity 4:

Throw yourself a Blondie disco using this Blondie playlist. Dance your heart out, stretch high and low and twist to the sides to get your body moving.

Activity 5:

The song ‘Rapture’ was the first No. 1 song in the U.S. to feature rap vocals (at 1min 50 here) Make up your own rap all about your day or your week.

Activity 6:

In the video for Blondie’s ‘Rapture’, graffiti artists Lee Quiñones (known for the graffiti he made on New York subway cars during the 1970s and 1980s) and artist Jean-Michel Basquiat make cameo appearances.

Make some graffiti art inspired by the artists – try using lettering to spell your name ‘tag’ or mask off some areas to paint over or paint a multi-colourful background and draw figures in black crayon, paint, or pen on top of it like Basquiat’s artwork.

Or colour this downloadable Basquiat colouring in page.

Activity 7:

Picture this, artist Andy Warhol once created a very famous ‘pop art’ image of Debbie Harry in block colours. Over the years it has been reproduced in other colours. Hunt your house for 4 block background colours (it could be towels, sheets, tshirts, etc) to take your photograph in front of, pop-art style!

Activity 8:

A famous Blondie album was ‘Parallel Lines’, the album cover featured black and white parallel lines , which are lines that lie in the same direction as the one next to it but do not meet. You can see parallel lines all over and even in nature like here.

Have a hunt around your house, can you spot any parallel lines? Jot your findings down in a notebook, or take some photos for evidence.

With your reminders of what parallel lines look like, create some parallel lines artwork like that of Mondrian’s grid paintings. You could dip the edge of a thick cardboard box into paint to create straight matching lines, or use a ruler. Share your art work with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Daily activity 72: Advertisements

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News: This Week in History

Fact of the day:

On June 30, 1898 Winton Motor Carriage Company published the first known automobile advert using the headline “dispense with a horse.”

Resources list:

Youtube; Smartphone/video camera; pens and paper; instruments, or homemade shakers, etc; magazines.

Activity 1:

Invent a new product, it could be a new car, a new cleaning product, a new breakfast cereal, a new album of your greatest hits, a new exercise machine, a new workout video, a new west end show, a new chocolate bar, a new item of clothing, a new burger, a new soft drink. Whatever you’d like.

It could be a serious product, or a ‘spoof’ or funny product like ‘Wet Dog Deodorant’, a ‘Cheese Printer’, ‘Bread Gloves’ or ‘Pickle and Bacon Toothpaste’!

Draw what your product would look like, or make a model of it, and give it a name. Think about what special things it does, or why it’s unique and exciting. What would people think was interesting about your product?

Activity 2:

Create and act in a TV Advert for your new product.

Come up with your own slogan to use in the advert (like ‘Just Do It’ by Nike, ‘I’m Lovin It’ by McDonalds, ‘The Isn’t Just Food’ by M&S, ‘Have A Break’ by Kitkat).

Come up with enticing adjectives that describe your product in an enticing way (like the M&S food adverts do) that you can say during the advert (delicious, stunning, exciting, fresh, etc).

Your advert should tell people about your product and get people excited about it.

You could film it on a smartphone and share it with us to see if you’ve convinced anybody or if anybody would be interest in buying it! You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

Create a radio jingle to advertise your new product. A catchy jingle will stick in people’s heads and make them want to buy your new product. You can use home made instruments such as shakers, sing your slogan, or make a parody of an existing song (such as ‘Simply The Best’).

Listen to some existing jingles for inspiration, such as the ‘I’m Loving It’ jingle by McDonalds, or the ‘Washing Machines Live Longer With Calgon’ jingle.

Activity 4:

Draw a newspaper or magazine advert for your new product. Come up with a logo for your product to feature in the advert. Look at some existing adverts and logos for inspiration. Try this logos quiz or this one.

 

 

Daily activity 71: Dolly Parton at Glastonbury

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News: This Week in History

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

On 29 June 2014, Dolly Parton played the Pyramid stage at Glastonbury Festival for the first time.

Resources list:

Youtube; Lyrics sheet; jar lid or box, elastic bands; sheet or towel; natural bit and pieces like leaves and twigs; paper and pens.

Activity 1:

Dolly Parton has composed over 3,000 songs and has had loads of hit songs such as Here You Come Again, Islands in the Stream, I Will Always Love You, Jolene, Baby I’m Burning, Two Doors Down, Coat of Many Colours, to name a few. But one of her best known songs is ‘9 to 5’.

Can you act out the story of the lyrics by coming up with actions or moves or sounds for the words highlighted here.

Learn some of the BSL signs for the lyrics to the chorus, ‘working’‘earn’‘giving’, ‘mind’, ‘drive’.

Activity 2:

Dolly plays many different instruments, she even uses her nails as an instrument. She wrote the song 9 to 5 with her nails to make the typewriter sound. Try rubbing your nails together to make the sound. What sounds can you make by brushing your nails across different surfaces, try a keyboard, the back of a fork, ridges on packaging, or anything else that you think sounds interesting. Play along to the song with your new percussion instrument.

Dolly also plays the Banjo on songs like ‘Applejack’. Make a banjo of your own with elastic bands on a jar lid or on a box and play along with Dolly!

Activity 3:

During her performance at Glastonbury, Dolly came up with a little rhyming song to describe the weather and conditions.

‘I grew up in the country, so this mud ain’t nothing new to me – and it ain’t nothing to you either,

Mud, mud, mud, mud,

Up to our bums in all this crud.’

Make up own rhyming song about the weather today.

Activity 4:

Dolly has a song called ‘Love is like a Butterfly’ try to ‘flutter your soft wings in flight’ by moving round your room in time to the song, using your arms as wings, or by making yourself some wings by draping a sheet or towel over your shoulders. You could make some multicoloured butterflies from natural items you could find outside.

Activity 5:

If you were putting together a music festival like Glastonbury, who would you like to perform? Create your dream festival line-up and make a colourful, eye-catching Poster for it – what will your festival be called?  Why not take a photo of festival poster and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 6:

Glastonbury has long been associated with mythology, magic and mystery, and many people, such as pagans and druids, find it to be a spiritual place. Glastonbury Tor is a special hill that has been associated with magic and mystery for thousands of years. Thousands of years ago early man used the Tor for rituals, and maze like path has been identified spiralling around the Tor seven times.

Create a ritual of your own by creating your own spiral maze; create a spiral by walking in a large circle 7 times (without getting dizzy!) to reach the magical Tor. Can you balance natural things (leaves, twigs, berries, moss) on your head as you spiral, to offer to mother nature on arrival at the Tor in the centre of your circle?

Add on Activity:

Watch Dolly play Glastonbury here.

Daily activity 70: Sports Day

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Exercise

Fact of the day:

Sports Days that are traditionally held at schools are called ‘Field Days’ in America.

Resources list:

Foil ball, spoon, cushion, wool; Bean bag, paperback, or freezer bag of rice; Youtube; Newspaper, paper, pens, glue or tape, buckets/pans/bins; toilet roll tubes or tin cans, newspaper ball, ball of socks.

Activity 1:

Egg and spoon Race. Balance a ball of tin foil on a spoon and create a course in your house or garden. How many times can you go back and forth along your course with your spoon without dropping your ball? Can you make it trickier for yourself by placing obstacles to step over, such as placing cushions on the floor, or having something to duck under, such as a piece of wool stretched across your path?

Activity 2:

Bean bag balance. Can you balance a bean bag on your head for a length of time? If you don’t have a bean bag you could try balancing a paperback book, or making a ‘beanbag’ by putting rice, sand, couscous or lentils in a small freezer bag. Can you balance it on your head while you’re balancing on one leg; can you balance it on your head while you walk around the room or crouching and standing up. Can you balance it walking at speed, jogging, or hopping? The final test – can you balance it on your head while dancing to this song, show your best moves and time yourself – how long can you keep the beanbag on your head for!?

Activity 3:

Welly throwing, also known as welly hoying and welly wanging, is a sport in which competitors are required to throw a Wellington boot as far as possible.

Make yourself 10 scrunched up newspaper balls. On them, stick different coloured drawings of a welly Create target zones by placing pans, bins, baskets, bowls, tubs, trugs, bags for life, etc on the floor, each target is worth different points – decide what these are. See how high a score you can get by ‘wanging’ your 10 wellies into the target zones. If it’s too easy, move the target zones further away from you or use smaller targets. Can you throw two wellies at the same time? If you’re really good, try throwing the wellies over your shoulder while you face in the opposite direction!!

Activity 4:

Create a Coconut shy. On top of 5-8 toilet roll tubes or tin cans, balance a newspaper ball (you could paint these brown to look like coconuts if you like). With a slightly heavier ball (this could be a ball of socks), how many coconuts can you topple over and win after 10 throws? If it’s too easy, move yourself further away from the coconuts, and move the coconuts further apart from each other. Try what happens if you balance your coconuts on taller kitchen roll tubes too.

Activity 5:

Make yourself a gold medal, rosette, or trophy for your excellence in exercising this week! Take a photo of you with your award and share it with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

 

 

Daily activity 69: Movement Games

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Exercise

Fact of the day:

Exercising improves our brain performance, especially if it includes challenges, tasks, and games.

Resources list:

Anna’s video; Youtube; Rainbow objects; markers for a course, ball, or newspaper ball, stopwatch.

Activity 1:

Watch this video by Anna, and join in her fun game of ‘Jellybean’

Activity 2:

Treasure hunt.

  1. Can you hunt around your house, reach high and reach low, and bring back to a table 5 objects – something that you think smells nice, feels nice, tastes nice, looks nice, and makes a nice sound.
  2. Can you move about and hunt around your house and bring back to a table something red, orange, yellow, green, light blue, dark blue, and purple?

Take a photo of your displays and share them with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

Musical statues – Have a good boogie to this song. Every time you hear him sing the words ‘Move On Up’ point upwards as far as you can stretch, making yourself really tall, and freeze for 5-10 seconds before dancing again.

Activity 4:

Dribbling a ball – Create a course to dribble your ball around – it could be marked out as a wiggle around and between books or cushions placed on the floor, or a wavy line of masking tape stuck on the floor to follow. Try dribbling a ball around your course. You could make a giant newspaper ball for this, or if it’s easier to control a small ball, try a ball of socks. How steady do you have to go to ensure you stay on course? Try some time trials to see how fast you can complete the course!

 

 

Daily activity 68: Keep Fit Workouts

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Exercise

Fact of the day:

A quarter of adults aren’t active at all, yet exercise plays an important role in keeping us happy and healthy.

Resources list:

Tricia’s video, fancy dress work out outfit; Youtube; paper and pens, rainbow printout; dice printout, scissors, glue or tape.

Activity 1:

Join in with this 70s Disco workout routine by Tricia.

What outfit change can you make halfway through?

Activity 2:

Wear your most colourful outfit like Mr Motivator and try out his ‘at home’ exercise routine either seated or standing.

What motivational slogan or rhyme can you say to yourself when you’re feeling a bit tired or can’t be bothered exercising? It could be something like ‘I Can Do It’ ‘I’ll feel better if you get moving’, ‘Keep on Moving’ or ‘Come On, [your name]’. Make a poster with your slogan, decorate the sign and put it up where you can see it to remind yourself to stay active.

Activity 3:

Try an Art Relay Race. Place coloured pens around the room. Time yourself to see how fast you can draw and colour a rainbow (you could colour this printout). Each time you need a new colour, race to the side of the room to collect it. You can only collect one pen at a time. How speedily can you complete your rainbow.

Or, have 4 rainbows around the room. Race between them, once colour at a time, completing all 4 rainbows in the quickest time possible.

Activity 4:

Make 2 dice (you could use this template here). On one dice write 6 different numbers (unless you’re feeling really fit, it’s probably best not to go higher than 10! Don’t make it too easy though, don’t write all 1s and 2s!) On the other dice write different exercise moves. These could be star jumps, double arm raises, squats, touch your toes, overhead stretch to the left and right, twist your chest to the left and right, knee raises, step ups (using 1st step on your stairs), hop on the spot, etc. Each number you roll is the amount of repetitions of the exercise that you’ve got to do. Pop on some motivational music and start rolling your dice!

Daily activity 67: Dance

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Exercise

Fact of the day:

Dancing is a whole-body workout that’s fun. It’s good for your heart, it makes you stronger, and it can help with balance and coordination.

Resources list:

Jess’s videos; Youtube; Dressing up costumes.

Activity 1:

Watch this dance tutorial video by Jess and learn some Samba moves.

Activity 2:

Watch this dance tutorial video by Jess and learn some Bollywood moves.

Activity 3:

Listen to this week’s music playlist and have a disco dance around your house. Put on, or make yourself a dancing costume.

Add on activity:

Ote Mabuse from Strictly has been posting dance tutorials during lockdown – can you keep up with her and have a go at one of them? Are you good enough to be on the next series of Strictly?!

Daily activity 66: Yoga

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Exercise

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

21st June is International Day of Yoga. Yoga is an ancient form of exercise that focuses on strength, flexibility and breathing.

Resources list:

Grace’s video, chair; Youtube, paper and pens.

Activity 1:

Watch this Superhero Yoga video made by Grace, and follow the movements to learn how to feel like a superhero.

Activity 2:

Try some seated ‘Adaptive Yoga’.

Activity 3:

The different moves in Yoga have weird and wonderful names: Boat, bridge, cobra, cat, child, dog, triangle, peacock, moon, lotus flower, tree, warrior, mountain, hero, cow, camel, fish, bow-and-arrow, eagle.

Can you come up with your own actions for each of the names? Can you draw them all in a big yoga doodle page. You can share your drawings with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Can you come up with a story, or song, that incorporates the different words; for example… I took a journey in a huge boat to the Bermuda triangle, in the sea I could see leaping silver fish as shiny as the moon, and on the shore I could see huge mountains covered in trees, etc… Act your story out wearing different costumes and using different props!

Activity 4:

Listen to some ‘Yoga Music’. How does it make you feel? Practice some steady ‘Yoga breathing’ with deep, steady breaths in and out in time to the slow and peaceful music.

 

Daily activity 65: A Mindful Wander

This week’s theme:

Learning Disability Week – The theme this year is the importance of friendships during lockdown.

Fact of the day:

Going for a wander can do wonders for our mental wellbeing.

Resources list:

Chemaine’s Video; Notebook and drawing materials.

Activity 1:

Watch the gentle video below of a friend from Purple Patch. Chemaine’s activities will help us to take a little time to concentrate on our mental wellbeing.

Add on activity:

On this day, Purple Patch would usually have a stall at the Leeds Picnic in the Park, organised by our friends at Aspire CBS. Since we can’t all meet up at the picnic this year, Aspire have organised ‘Picnic In Your Garden’ – Hold your very own picnic in a garden and send photographs to post on the Aspire Facebook page. They’ll be looking out for people doing fantastic activities, eating amazing food and/or wearing fabulous outfits!  If you don’t want to post your photos directly to the Aspire Facebook page you could send them to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll tag Aspire for you on our Facebook page.

Friday 19th June is Learning Disability Pride day, organised by Connect in The North. This is to celebrate being proud of having learning disabilities. This year they are asking people to share photos of themselves celebrating the things they do. You can email yours to cathy@citn.org.uk

Daily activity 64: Dances that brought people together

This week’s theme:

Learning Disability Week – The theme this year is the importance of friendships during lockdown.

Fact of the day:

New and exciting war-time dances entertained and brought people together in a time of crisis.

Resources list:

Jess’s video. A chair if you’d like to do the dances seated.

Activity 1:

Watch Jess’s video below to learn some Jive and Swing dance steps from the era of World War 2.

Add on activity:

Today, our friends at Aspire are hosting their ‘Day of Dance’ – Watch and join in with dance videos posted on their  Facebook page led by some of the people who usually dance for them during Leeds Learning Disability Week.

Daily activity 63: Friendship Songs

This week’s theme:

Learning Disability Week – The theme this year is the importance of friendships during lockdown.

Fact of the day:

‘With a Little Help from My Friends’ is a song by the Beatles from their 1967 album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Resources list:

James’s video. Fancy dress costume. Pens, container, rice or lentils. An other musical instruments if you’d like to use them.

Activity 1:

Watch James’s video and join in with the song!

 

 

Daily activity 62: Artistic Duos & Collectives

This week’s theme:

Learning Disability Week – The theme this year is the importance of friendships during lockdown.

Fact of the day:

Christo and Jeanne-Claude were an artistic duo who created large scale public art works together. They were famous for wrapping huge landmarks, buildings and bridges in fabric.

Resources list:

Lorna’s video; Piece of fabric, scarf, or towel; Objects to wrap up.

Activity 1:

Watch Lorna’s video and join in with her Christo and Jeanne-Claude inspired art activities.

 

Add-on activity:

Our friends at Aspire CBS have organised an ‘Aspire Walk Around The World‘ today that you could join in with. Take a walk around your garden or during your planned daily exercise and count your steps. Let Aspire know how many you did, with photo if possible. They’ll add all the steps together and see how far round the world everybody got!!

Daily activity 61: Friendship Poetry

This week’s theme:

Learning Disability Week – The theme this year is the importance of friendships during lockdown.

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet celebrating Learning Disability Week here.

Fact of the day:

The first poem was written 4000 years ago in Mesopotamia. It was an epic poem that would have taken days to read!

Resources list:

Lisa’s video.

Activity 1:

Watch Lisa read her poem ‘A Friend’ and join in with the actions and signs.

Add-on activity:

People Matters are hosting a photography competition for Learning Disability Week. The theme is On Your Doorstep and you can send your entries to info@peoplemattersleeds.co.uk by Tuesday 16th June 2020 (tomorrow!) For more info see here.

Daily activity 60: Rock Pools

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – The Ocean

Fact of the day:

As the tide goes out, sea creatures and plants are revealed in the glittering rock pool waters left behind.

Resources list:

Beachwear and beach accessories; sand, pebbles; Youtube; Plastic box or bowl; Waterproof paint; Playdoh, plasticine; Washing up bowl; Blindfold, fruit and veg; Toilet roll tube, pipecleaners; Bag of objects; Bubblewrap, soap.

Activity 1:

Get dressed for a visit to the beach, pop on your hat, sunglasses, shorts and tshirts. In your beach bag pop in a beach towel, suncream and an inflatable. Bring a crabbing bucket or a net for the rock pools, we’re going to need them most!

If you have some, dip your toes in some sand (or put your finger tips in a bowl of sugar to feel a similar sensation and sound). If you have some, clink together some pebbles, as if you’re walking towards a rockpool on the beach. Make the sound of waves crashing as you move further towards the beach.

Dressed for the beach, hop on your surfboard for a dance, or move in and out like the tides to this song.

Activity 2:

In a plastic box/bowl/tub create a sensory rock pool of your own with stones, shells, sand, etc and fill it with water. You could paint some sea creatures on some of the rocks to submerge into your rock pool. Have a feel around in your rock pool with your hands or feet.

Activity 3:

One of the creatures that sometimes live in rock pools are Hermit Crabs.

Hermit Crabs don’t have their own shells, so live inside any empty shell they find. They need a shell as they have very soft bodies that they need to protect – like the inside of an egg needs an egg shell. Make a soft hermit crab from playdoh or plasticine, or draw one on paper. See what objects in your house you could place on top that might make a hard, temporary shell for it – maybe an egg cup, maybe part of an egg box, maybe the lid of a bottle. One hermit crab even lived inside a Lego shell!

Practice your sideways walking like a crab. Try doing it with a washing up bowl on your back, mimicking a shell.

Hermit crabs have 2 antennae, one for smelling and one for tasting. Have a blindfolded smell and taste test of some different fruit and vegetables cut up – can you identify them without seeing what they look like? Do you wish you had antennae to help?

Activity 4:

Sea Anemones are other creatures that live in rockpools. Make some of your own, they could maybe look like this or this. Why not take a photo of your Anemone and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 5:

A Starfish has eyes at the tip of each of its arm. It is very likely that Star fish eyes can see in every direction at once!

Practice ‘seeing’ with the tips of your arms (your hands!!) Have somebody hide 10 different objects in a bag. Blindfolded can you ‘see’ what the objects are by feeling them? Are they hard/soft, warm/cold, smooth/rough, big/small. Do you know what they all are?

Activity 6:

Seaweeds  are edible plant-like organisms that grow in the ocean. One type that we see a lot of in the UK is  Bladderwrack. Make your own by cutting some bubble wrap into strips. Put it into a bowl or sink of water and feel the bubbles underwater as if they were the bladders (also known as vesicles) of the Bladderwrack. Add some soap on your hands to create a more realistic slipperiness of the seaweed!

Add on activity:

See if you can identify any other creatures that live in rockpools here.

 

 

 

 

 

Daily activity 59: Coral Reefs

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – The Ocean

Fact of the day:

Coral reefs are living structures found underwater and are home to a diverse group of sea creatures. Coral Reefs are often called ‘Rainforests of the Sea’.

Resources list:

Youtube; Bowl of warm water; Paint, straws, paper; Hard and soft objects; Paper and colouring pens/pencils; Colander/sieve/old pair of tights, jug of water, beads/seeds/dried lentils/dry rice; Paint, bubble mixture, or washing up liquid, paper; Chalk, seashells, vinegar.

Activity 1:

Coral reefs are spectacular, densely packed gardens in the sea that are home to a huge amount of marine life. Coral reefs are living structures that are home to the greatest diversity of life in the oceans, and are second only to tropical rainforests in the number of species found in one area on Earth. Nearly 25% of all marine life depends upon coral reefs for their survival.Because of this, coral reefs are often called “the rainforests of the sea”. Coral reefs are fragile. Boating and pollution can damage coral reefs.

Watch this livestream filmed with an underwater camera in the coral reefs of the Cayman Islands.

Gently wave and move your body like the movement of the coral in the livestream.

Fill a bowl with warm tropical water and slowly wiggle your fingers in the waters, mimicking the movement of coral.

Activity 2:

Make some paint blown coral paintings using a straw like this. Share your artwork with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

There are two main types of coral- Hard Coral and Soft Coral.

Have a hunt around your house for colourful hard and soft objects. Bring them back to a table and make a ‘coral’ arrangement.

Activity 4:

There are corals called ‘Gorgonians’ which take the shape of a fan. They are orange, red, yellow, pink, purple, and white, and while able to grow several feet high and across, they are typically only a few inches thick. The more flexible and fan shaped it is, the rougher the water they live in tends to be.

Make a paper fan and decorate it with oranges, reds, pinks and purples and then waft it in the swell of the ocean, or as you dance along to this song.

Activity 5:

Sea Pen coral looks like the quill of an old fashioned pen. It is found in tropical waters and roots itself into the ocean floor and filters plankton (like this) from the water with its plumage.

Use a colander/sieve/old pair of tights to ‘filter’ some plankton. Fill a jug of water with ‘plankton’ – these could be beads, seeds, dried lentils, dry rice, etc. Pour the jug of water through your filter to see how many plankton you can catch, allowing the clear water to pass through, like it passes through the Sea Pen. If you used a colander, did some of your plankton pass through the bigger holes?

Activity 6:

Finger Coral looks like human fingers. Exercise your fingers and hands with these exercises.

Activity 7:

Bubble Coral is a delicate coral that lives in shallow reefs. It expands/grows bigger during the day to increase how much sunlight it can soak in, and retracts/makes itself smaller at night to let its tentacles out to feed.

Have a gentle dance, rising and falling like bubbles to this song.

Try making some bubble paintings.

Activity 8:

Coral reefs are very fragile and delicate. Pollution is causing the water in coral reefs to become more acidic. This acid is killing coral reefs. Try an experiment that demonstrates the ability that acid (in this case, vinegar) has to ‘dissolve’ the coral reefs and shells which protect ocean life. The coral in this experiment is represented by chalk, or sea shells (if you have any that you don’t mind dissolving) as these are made up of the same material as coral.

Carefully half fill a clear cup or container with clear vinegar. Add a piece of chalk to the container. Some chalk is made with a protective cover to stop chalk rubbing off on hands. It may help to break a piece of chalk into smaller pieces to better see effects of the vinegar. Observe what is happening.

 

 

Daily activity 58: Fish and Molluscs

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – The Ocean

Fact of the day:

The majority of life on Earth is aquatic, a staggering 94% of the Earth’s living species exist within oceans.

Resources list:

Paper, paint, coloured pens/pencils, patterned backgrounds; String, magnet, headband, headtorch, card fish shapes, paperclips; 8 ties or strips of fabric or ribbon; Toilet roll tubes, wool, scissors; blanket or tablecloth; Bottle, non-latex glove, hot water and hair gel.

Activity 1:

There are many underwater creatures that are great at disguise – watch this incredible video.

Cuttlefish are colour magicians of the deep, with the ability to change their colour, texture and shape almost instantaneously to blend in with their surroundings.

What cuttlefish can do is known as adaptive camouflage, which is the ability to adapt to its surroundings in a split second. Can you camouflage some objects? A blue pen on a blue book background. Or paint something to match the same patterned backgrounds, maybe like this.

Activity 2:

Pufferfish, also known as blowfish, developed their famous “puff” because their slow swimming style make them vulnerable to predators. Most pufferfish contain a toxic substance that makes them foul tasting and potentially deadly to some fish. This toxin, however, is most definitely deadly to humans! There is enough poison in one fish to kill 30 adult humans, and we have yet to discover an antidote.

Have a game similar to ‘musical statues’; ask somebody to play your favourite song, swim around the room like a fish as it plays. When the music stops, freeze and move your arms into a circle around you and blow out your cheeks so it looks like you’re puffing or blowing up like a puffer fish!

Activity 3:

Down in the very depths of the deepest oceans that sunlight can no longer reach exists the ‘Midnight Zone’, a pitch black part of the sea that is home to some very unusual and skilfully adapted species.

Anglerfish are one of the creatures that rely on their bioluminescent light to catch prey, they have a bright lure on the top of its head which it waves backwards and forwards.

Can you create a fishing game but the fishing line (piece of string with magnet attached) is attached to your head (be attaching it to a headband or hat, or better still to a head torch). Cut out some fish shapes and attach metal paper clips to them. See what you as an angler fish can catch!

Activity 4:

Octopuses are ocean creatures that have eight ‘arms’. They also have three hearts and blue blood; they squirt ink to deter predators; and being boneless, they can squeeze into (or out of) tight spaces. They are quite intelligent and have been observed using tools.

Tie 8 ties/scarves/ribbons/strips of fabric to your belt – swish your tentacles as you dance to this song.

Activity 5:

Make a toilet roll tube squid and octopus. Why not take a photo of your molluscs and share them with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 6:

In the reefs of the western Pacific, female Manta Rays pick their perfect partner by leading male suitors on a spectacular high-energy dance. It starts with one female manta ray leading up to 25 male suitors in an amazing acrobatic display. like this. They all line up behind her one by one as if in military step before following their female leader on a spectacular helter-skelter chase around the reef. The female manta ray swims as fast as she can, swooping and turning, and the males pursue her, trying to keep up. She sometimes performs dizzying somersaults out of the water as if to make it more difficult for them to mimic her. Eventually, most of the male rays get tired and give up, leaving the last one swimming in her wake the winner.

Using a blanket over your shoulders to make the shape of a Manta Ray, dance in your garden like a Manta Ray.

Activity 7:

Make a Jellyfish sensory bottle like this here using a bottle, non-latex glove, hot water and hair gel. It mimics the movement of Jellyfish  in the ocean. Can you move your body and wibble-wobble like the jellyfish too?

 

 

Daily activity 57: Ocean Myths

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – The Ocean

Fact of the day:

Water and the sea play important roles in many legends and myths.

Resources list:

Paper, paint, tape; Right angle triangles; Bowl, water, tinfoil, weights, plasticine; Straw; Youtube; Card, sticks, lamp or torch, sheet; Bottle, veg oil, water, glitter or tinfoil shards.

Activity 1:

The Kraken was first mentioned in a 13th-century Icelandic saga, the sea-dwelling kraken is a terrifying monster. It can reach the top of a sailing ship’s main mast, wrap its many tentacles around the hull and capsize it. Historians say the legend derived from ­sailors’ eyewitness accounts of the giant squid which can reach 60 feet in length.

Make some artwork, similar to this of a Kraken’s tentacles rising from the depths of the sea to a boat on the surface. If you cut out tentacle shapes and lay (or slightly tape them down) them down to paint over, when you lift the cut-outs off, you will see your tentacles in relief like this artwork.

What’s the biggest thing in your house that you can wrap your tentacle arms around – do you think you could reach around a boat like a Kraken?

Activity 2:

The Bermuda Triangle. Many ships and planes have vanished without a trace in a triangle shaped area of the Atlantic Ocean between Miami, Bermuda and Puerto Rico. Wild theories have accompanied the disappearances, from magnetic activity to alien abductions.

Cut out a bunch of right-angle triangles, all the same size as each other (any square piece of paper cut in two diagonally will make a right angle triangle; try 10cm squares, or post it notes cut diagonally). You can cut these out from different textured materials (e.g. card, foil, kitchen roll, sand paper, coloured plastic bags, fabric). Can you slide, flip and rotate your pieces to ‘tessellate’ and make a triangle from 4 triangles? How big a ‘Bermuda Triangle’ you can make from smaller triangles tessellated like this – can it stretch from Miami to Bermuda?

Activity 3:

The sea can be described as the planet’s mega museum. There are more artifacts and remnants of history in the ocean than in all of the world’s museums combined! Around 1,000 shipwrecks lie off the Florida Keys alone. Other underwater museums include one in the Mediterranean for this submerged bronze statue.

In a bowl or tub, sink a tinfoil ship of your own by filling it with weights. Create an underwater world with lots of different underwater statues (made from plasticine, for example), then dive your hands in to explore it.

Activity 4:

You would either need to dive or take a submarine to explore the deep sea – what do you think each one would be like? Can you act it out?

Can you recreate any of these diver’s Scuba sounds try blowing bubbles under water through a straw.

This is an incredible video of a little submarine diving to hear whale song. How would you feel in this little sub? With your arms outstretched, try moving like the submarine, tilting left and right and diving deep down. Try making the sounds of the whales.

Try signing along to this Yellow submarine song.

Activity 5:

The Creature from the Black Lagoon was a fictitious monster in a 1954 film. Draw some scary sea monsters of your own, cut them out and make them into shadow puppets  to perform a dark shadowy sea monster play of your own. You can either shine a light/lamp/torch onto a wall to create shadows, or stand behind a white sheet with the light behind you to create shadows.

Activity 6:

In folklore, a mermaid is an aquatic creature with the head and upper body of a female human and the scaly tail of a fish. Make yourself a Mermaid scales sensory bottle using water, a drop of vegetable oil and large flake glitter or tiny ripped up pieces of tin foil. Shake up the mermaid scale sensory bottle to mix up the ingredients; watching the contents move around may be a way to feel more relaxed.

Daily activity 56: World Oceans Day

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – The Ocean

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s underwater colouring sheet Here!

Fact of the day:

Over 70% of Earth is covered in water, this is why it’s often known as the ‘Blue Planet’.

Resources list:

Cardboard box, creative bits and bobs; Youtube; Poem download; Water, cups, salt, sugar, bicarb, objects to float and sink e.g. grapes; Ziplock freezer bag, blue hand soap or hair gel and a touch of blue food colouring, water, sand and some ocean objects; Seahorse download, glue, colouring pens or paints, bun cases.

Activity 1:

Make an underwater diorama, or display in a cardboard box – here’s a few for inspiration: Idea 1.  Idea 2. Idea 3.  Idea 4. Idea 5.  Idea 6.  Idea 7.  Idea 8.

Why not take a photo of your underwater scene and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

Listen to some sounds from the deep ocean. Can you mimic any of them.

Can you do any impressions of marine animals like Dolphin calls, Beluga Whales, Sea lion, Walrus, Whale song.

Activity 3:

Read, or have somebody read to you ‘The Ocean’s Secret’ poem here.

Come up with some actions to act the poem out – can you move like the waves, or the crabs; can you scream like the wind or shriek like a seagull; can you feel rocks and sand; can you smell or taste some salt water; can you put your hands or feet into some tide waters; can you move back and forth like the tides; can you beat out a rhythm on your thighs of the in-and-out; can you do deep breaths like the tide moving in and out; can you do some power poses like the unafraid tides; can you add glitter to a jar of water to create sparkling, mysterious waters?

Activity 4:

Salty ocean water is different from fresh river water. Try an experiment… Dissolve 2 tablespoons of salt in one cup, 2 tablespoons of sugar in another cup, and 2 tablespoons of baking soda in a third cup. Be sure to leave one cup as plain, fresh water. Add objects to your cups, such as grapes and see which grapes float and which sink. Salty water is more dense. This means it gets heavier. Many objects that sink in fresh water will float in salt water!

Activity 5:

Try some ocean exercises…

Starfish stretch: Stand with your feet wide apart, reach your hands out to the side as far as you can. Keep your back nice and tall and remember to breathe.

Crab yoga: Sit on your bottom with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Place your hands on the floor behind your hips, shoulder width apart. Straighten your arms and lift your bum up off the ground. Hold and lower. Remember to breathe.

Sea lion movement: Standing up hold a small object such as a ball or cushion between your knees, turn out your toes on both feet to each side. Walk around without dropping the ball.

Squid stretch: Stand or sit up tall, with legs hip width apart. Place your palms together in front of your body and breathe. Raise your hands up over your head, palms still together. Look up and breathe.

Lobster pinch: Sit or stand with your arms outstretched. Open and close your fingers to stretch your hands like a lobster’s claws.

Pufferfish breathing: Stand or sit up tall with your hands on your stomach. Breathe in and feel your stomach rise. Breathe out and feel your stomach go in. Try it a few times.

Activity 6:

Make an ocean sensory bag to feel the water between your hands, or under your feet. You’ll need a secure ziplock freezer bag, blue hand soap (or hair gel and a touch of blue food colouring), water, sand and some ocean objects (plastic marine animals, shells, 3D homemade tinfoil fish, laminated pictures, etc) to feel for in the sea. Try and squeeze out as much air as you can so that the bag lies flat. You could tape all the edges too to make sure you don’t accidentally pop it!

Activity 7:

Make a Seahorse using this template to colour in, and decorate with bun cases for fins.

Add-on activity:

Play this online underwater bubbles game, catch only the bubbles by using your arrow keys.

Or play this Sea Pong game using your cursor to move your octopus and bat the ball back and forth.

Daily activity 55: World Environment Day

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – Climate Change

Fact of the day:

Every year on 5 June, people across the globe celebrate World Environment Day to raise environmental awareness. It’s an opportunity for us to think about how we can live greener lives.

Resources list:

Paper, pens, blue and green items; bottles, cartons and tubes from your recycling; cape, water, plastic bowl; natural objects; Youtube.

Activity 1:

What words do you already associate with ‘climate change’? Write the words down, decorate them, and cut them out. Look around your house for different green and blue pieces of fabric, clothes, and household items – these could be different textures, sizes and materials. Place your items on the floor in the shape of a green and blue world for you to place your words on top of.

Take a photo of your world and words and share it with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

Our ‘Carbon footprint’ is the mark (or the ‘impact’) that all of the things we do leaves on the planet and the environment. See this film for more info.

On a piece of paper, draw around your foot, or bring your shoe onto the tabletop and draw around its sole. Decorate and colour in the foot. Make a few of these to cut out. Stick the feet up around your house to remind yourself about things that affect your carbon footprint, and changes that you could make. Stick one up next to a light switch to remind you to turn it off when you leave the room. Stick one up next to your tap to remind yourself to stop the tap running while you brush your teeth. Stick one on your fridge to remind yourself to shut the fridge door properly. Stick one up next to your bins to remind yourself to put rubbish or recyclables into the correct one.

Activity 3:

One way that we can reduce our carbon footprint is to Reduce, Reuse, Repair, Recycle & Compost.

Reducing means using less of resources such as plastic, water, electricity. Reusing means getting a lot of wear out of one item before it’s thrown out, this includes repairing things when they break rather than just buying new ones, and having reusable items, such as lunchboxes and coffee cups rather than using disposable items. Recycling is the process of sending items off to be converted into new products, such as plastic bottles being turned into new plastic items. Composting is when organic materials (such as plant trimmings, vegetable cuttings, eggshells and teabags) rot down and turn into compost rather than being thrown in the bin.

Make a persuasive poster or a song to remind people in your house about these things. What would you like people to do? You could remind people what items can be recycled (paper, cardboard and cartons, metal and cans, plastic, glass) and which can’t?

Activity 4:

Make a skittles or bowling game from empty pop bottles, juice cartons, or toilet tubes. When you’ve finished the game everything can go straight into your recycling bin!

Activity 5:

Become a climate superhero – reduce your own personal environmental impact by practicing to save water. Pick a superhero theme tune (it could be your favourite song), put on a superhero cape (it could be a tea towel, blanket or tablecloth cape) and outside design a course that you can take laps of. Fill a plastic bowl to the top with water and walk the course taking care not to spill a drop of water. Try doing the course again, but a bit quicker, still saving all of the water in your bowl. You could add obstacles or exercises at different points of the course that mean you have to be extra careful to preserve your water!

Activity 6:

See if you can find things in your house that start with the letters R.E.C.Y.C.L.E. For example, it could be a Rubber, Egg, Cardboard box, Yellow t-shirt, Clipboard, Letter, Envelope.

Activity 7:

Make 3 signs- ‘Plastic’, ‘Glass’ and ‘Paper’. Put the signs in different parts of your room. When the following words are read out, move to the sign that you think the items are made from.

Milk bottle; Pickle jar; Magazines; Newspaper; Junk mail; Jam jar; Cereal box; Water bottle; Ketchup bottle; Envelope; Shopping bag.

Can you think of any more of your own?

Activity 8:

If you go outside on a walk, or into your garden or outside area collect a few objects from the natural environment that you are drawn to. It could be sticks, stones, petals, leaves, feathers, seed pods, etc.

Imagine that your objects are mysterious and come up with a story about it (you could act the story out if you like). For example, a small twig could be a wizard’s staff that he uses to travel across the world with. A leaf could be the umbrella of a small talking shrew who uses his own language. A shell could be a boat for a tiny pirate elf. Have fun telling and acting out your stories!

Activity 9:

Have a dance to our playlist of songs about the environment.

Daily activity 54: Trees

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – Climate Change

Fact of the day:

Trees act like the lungs of the earth. Trees help the planet breathe by turning carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) into clean, pure oxygen.

Resources list:

Paper, pens, paint; Youtube; water, kitchen roll; tube, leaves, sticks; green and brown clothing; paper, pens, ball of socks.

Activity 1:

Trees absorb or ‘breathe in’ Carbon Dioxide gas through their leaves and ‘breathe out’ Oxygen. On this film you can see that half way through the year, when trees have their green leaves, that the swirling levels of carbon dioxide (red) in the air decrease, and then return again when the leaves of the trees fall off at the beginning and end of the year, in winter.

Draw a bare tree (or download and print this one), and cover it in leaves that do the important job of absorbing carbon dioxide. You can do this by cutting out leaf shapes to glue on your tree, finger painting leaves, using bubble wrap dipped in paint to print leaves, or simply drawing them on.

Activity 2:

Point to where your own lungs are. Try this singing warm up that is good for the health of your own lungs. You’ll be able to feel your lungs working as you sing the warm up breaths!

Activity 3:

A tree’s leafy canopy catches rain before it reaches the ground, allowing some of the water to gently drip to the ground and the rest to evaporate. When it rains heavily these trees and their leafy tops can slow the water down, stop it from hitting the ground quickly, and stop it from flowing fast over the ground. This means that the rain water doesn’t rush as quickly into rivers and streams and cause flash flooding.

Try an experiment. Onto a piece of kitchen roll, slowly drip water from a tap, or drip water off your fingertips – the kitchen roll should be able to cope with a slow drip and absorb the water well. If you turn the tap on for a faster flow of water, the kitchen roll won’t be able to absorb all the water and will ‘flood’. This is what leaves and trees do, they slow the water flow down enabling rain water to slowly drip to the ground and be absorbed by the soil. Without trees the rain water flows fast and the ground can’t absorb it quickly enough, or becomes too soggy, and the water floods.

Try another experiment with a tube. Time how long it takes water, poured from a watering can, to pass through a tube. It’ll be fast! This is like rain falling from the sky directly onto the ground. Now put some trees and their leaves in the way of the rain by pushing some leaves, twigs, or pretend leaves made from your recycling into the tube. Pour your water again, the leaves should ‘catch’ and slow down the speed of your water through the tube; just like what happens in a forest by the canopy of trees.

Activity 4:

Act like a tree! If you have them, dress in green and brown clothing; start off small as a sapling planted in the ground – grow up taller and taller, as far as you can stretch, hold out your arms like branches, rustle and wiggle your leaves at your fingertips, stand up tall and strong with your trunk, wriggle your toe roots, or lie on the floor and stretch out like roots making a slurping noise, sucking up water! You could listen to this song as you move your branches and sway your trunk in a gentle breeze

Activity 5:

The rings inside a tree can tell scientists how old a tree is and what the weather conditions were like during each year of that tree’s life. Very old trees can offer clues about what the climate in an area was like long before measurements were recorded. If you’ve ever seen a tree stump, you probably noticed that the top of the stump had a series of rings. These rings can tell us how old the tree is, and what the weather was like during each year of the tree’s life. The light-colored rings represent wood that grew in the spring and early summer, while the dark rings represent wood that grew in the late summer and fall. One light ring plus one dark ring equals one year of the tree’s life.

Tree rings usually grow wider in warm, wet years and they are thinner in years when it is cold and dry. If the tree has experienced stressful conditions, such as a drought, the tree might hardly grow at all in those years.

Draw your own tree rings using light then dark, light then dark coloured lines. Share photos of your work on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Make a tree ring dart board for the floor – it could be drawn on a cardboard box, on a large piece or roll of paper, or marked out with masking tape (a bit like this), earn points for your ball (this could be a ball of socks) landing in the different concentric circles.

Activity 6:

‘Shirin Yoko’ is the Japanese art of ‘Forest Bathing’! Forest Bathing is a belief that spending time immersed in forests and around trees promotes good health, improves well being, boosts your creativity and reduces stress.  It’s not about spending time in forests to do exercise or workouts, but just to sit or lay near trees in quiet contemplation, feeling connected to nature. Try sitting quietly by a tree; can you hear it and smell it and touch it? Can you make a bark rubbing to see and feel the texture, or collect some leaves or fallen twigs to smell and touch?

Or, listen to the sounds of a woodland or take this guided path through trees – what do you think it smells like there?

Look up, can you see the top of the tree? How about the sky? Can you see any clouds, if so do they look like anything – can you spot any faces, rabbit, or snakes?

Daily activity 53: Renewable Energy

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – Climate Change

Fact of the day:

Renewable energy sources (such as wind, wave, tidal, solar, and hydro) create less greenhouse gas.

Resources list:

A4 paper; tin foil, paper, cocktail stick, blutack; sink, chopping board, ball; sheet, ball; Youtube; Paper and pens.

Activity 1:

Wind power – Make a paper wind turbine.

Activity 2:

Wind power – Make a wind-powered tinfoil boat (with a paper sail taped to a cocktail stick stuck into blutack inside your boat). Blow or use a fan on the sail to power your boat, bobbing in a sink or in a washing up bowl. Join in with some sea shanties as you go!

Activity 3:

Water power (hydroelectric). Water is collected behind dams on large rivers and when it’s released the enormous power of the falling water is capable of turning giant turbines which generate electricity. The degree of power is determined by the amount of water and the distance it falls.

Create different slopes into a sink/bath/washing up bowl (eg using a chopping board/plastic box lid/tray). Use a tinfoil ball or a pingpong ball and see how fast you can get it to roll/slide down your slope when you pour water behind it (from a watering can, for example). Does it move faster if the slope is shallow or steep, if you use a small trickle of water, or a gush of water, if you start the ball off near the top or the bottom of the slope? Experiment and see how much power you can generate with the ball falling.

Activity 4:

Wave power – make waves with a sheet/tablecloth. Can you use the power and energy of a wave to get a newspaper ball to the other side of the sheet?

Move your arms in a wave – stretch them out to each side of you, and starting with your right hand fingers send a wave up your right arm and down your left arm.

Activity 5:

Wave power – How high to waves have to be to provide the energy to upturn a tinfoil boat – try this experiment using a ball dropped into water to create waves.

Activity 6:

Tidal power – this relies on the natural pattern of the sea’s tides moving in and out which they do daily. Practice slow and steady breathing in and out like the gentle tides, watch here or here.

Activity 7:

Solar power – this uses energy from the sun’s light to generate electricity or heat. You might have got into a car that’s been heated up by the sun, or have seen solar-powered garden lights or calculators, or have seen solar panels on people’s roofs.

If it’s a sunny day, use the sun’s light rays to create shadow art, drawing the shadows of things that you can place in the sun (like this or this), create tinfoil sculptures to place in the sun like this, or draw around things you naturally see outdoors in the sun like this.

Activity 8:

Learn the BSL signs for wind, blow, wave, tide, and solar.

Daily activity 52: Changes to Polar Ice Caps

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – Climate Change

Fact of the day:

Temperature changes at the North and South poles affects what species can survive there.

Resources list:

Gloves, frozen icepack/peas, cold water; icecubes, 2 jars, cling film, elastic band, windowsill; 2 glasses, water, icecubes, lolly sticks, lamp; Youtube, newspaper; tube or pot, crafty materials, pens, plate, cotton wool.

Activity 1:

On a map, find where you think the Arctic (North) and Antarctic (South) are – this is where the polar ice regions are. The average Arctic winter temperature is -34°C brrrr!! Put on some gloves and hold some icepacks, frozen peas, or icecubes. Put your hands and/or feet in cold water for a little while to experience life at the poles.

Activity 2:

NASA has found that 2010-2019 was the hottest decade ever recorded, and that globally 2016 was the hottest year ever (closely followed by 2019). Such temperatures, caused by global warming, are causing polar ice regions to melt.

Try a heat and ice experiment. Take two large glass bottles or jars of the same size, place an ice cube in each jar. Cover one of the jar openings tight with clingfilm (or a recycled bag) with an elastic band.  Leave the other jar open. Place the jars on a sunny windowsill and keep observing the ice for changes. Which ice cube do you think will melt fastest in its sunny spot?

(The ice in the jar whose heat is trapped by the cling film (much like greenhouse gases causing global warming) should melt the quickest).

Activity 3:

There are 2 types of ice in polar regions, land ice and floating sea ice. It’s mostly the melting land ice that is causing sea levels to rise across the world.

Try another ice experiment. In 2 glasses place the exact same amount of ‘sea’ water. You could mark in felt tip on the outside of the glass where your sea level is to start with. Into one of the glasses of ‘sea water’ place an ice cube (this is floating sea ice, such as an iceberg). For the other glass suspend the ice cube out of the water, sit it on top of a couple of lollypop sticks laying over the mouth of the glass (this ice is ‘on land’ or glacial, but when it melts the water can dripple off the sticks and into the ‘sea’). Put both glasses under a lamp (the sun). After 10 minutes watching the ice melt, see which glass has the highest ‘sea level’ now.

If the experiment has gone to plan, you should be able to observe that the water level in the glass with suspended land ice has increased more than the glass with floating ice. This shows that land ice melts quickest and thus it’s melting land ice (such as the glaciers) that are the biggest worry we have when thinking about rising sea levels, and it’s those that we need to protect most.

Activity 4:

Try one more ice cube experiment. 80% of the sunlight that strikes the polar caps is reflected back out of our atmosphere. Without the ice caps, that amount of heat will be absorbed by our oceans and will cause ocean temperatures to rise.

Have 2 bowls, one with warm water and one with cold water – place an ice cube in each, which do you think will melt fastest?

(The ice cube in the warm water will melt quicker. If ocean temperatures get warm like this, not only will more of the polar ice caps melt, but animals that need cold water to live in will struggle too).

Activity 5:

Have a good dance to this week’s music playlist. When the 1st song stops, stand on a fully opened piece of newspaper which will represent a polar ice cap. When the next song starts, fold the newspaper in half to stand on at the end of the song. Keep doing this, and folding the newspaper in half each time. How many songs does it take before there is not enough room on the newspaper to stand on? The polar ice caps are melting like this due to a rise in temperature, and shrinking like this due to a rise in sea levels, meaning there’s less and less space for animals to stand and live on.

Activity 6:

Temperature changes at the poles affects what species can survive there, and it affects their habitats. This climate change is the single greatest threat to polar bears. This is because the sea ice they depend on to hunt and breed is melting away. Loss of sea-ice also threatens polar bears’ main prey, seals, which depend on sea-ice to raise their young and rest.

Make a polar bear from a toilet roll tube, yoghurt pot or paper cup.

Or, make a cotton wool polar bear on a plate.

Take photos and share your polar bears on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 7:

In Antarctica, Emperor Penguins are classed as ‘near threatened’ on the extinction list. Climate change and warming oceans will reduce the Antarctic sea-ice, which will result in the loss of large areas of their breeding habitat.

Like all penguins they can’t fly, so waddle clumsily on land (see 1.20 mins in of this clip here) or slide along the ice; in water however, they glide and dive effortlessly. Try waddling like a penguin, and act out slipping and sliding on ice. Is your fancy footwork anything like this?

Daily activity 51: Climate change and weather patterns

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – Climate Change

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here. This week’s features Greta Thunberg, the young Swedish environmental activist.

Fact of the day:

Climate change is the increase in the planet’s temperature due to human-made emissions of greenhouse gases. The increased temperature means that there are changes in the world’s weather patterns and more common extreme weather events.

Resources list:

Woolly hat and scarf, hot water bottle, blankets; plastic cups and water; tin foil, torch, sun cream, sunglasses; water, washing up bowl, rice; jar, water, washing up liquid, vinegar; toilet roll tube or orange, fat, birdseed; Youtube.

Activity 1:

The planet is heating up due to global warming. Experiment with different temperatures. Get wrapped up in woolly layers, hats and gloves, and hold a hot water bottle, wrapped in a blanket or duvet. If you felt that hot all the time, even in the middle of summer on an already hot day, would it feel comfortable?

Activity 2:

Greenhouse gasses (like carbon dioxide) build up in atmosphere and act like the glass in a greenhouse, letting the heat from the sun in but not back out again.

Create a mini greenhouse using plastic cups (or a jar with a lid). Pop a plant in it if you like, or else you could fill one of the cups with water. Once it has been sat on a warm windowsill with the sun’s light on it for a few hours, carefully lift off the top cup and see how much heat has been trapped inside – does it feel hot inside and does the water feel warmer than when you added it? This is a bit like how the earth is heating up.

Activity 3:

The ozone layer is an invisible layer of gas around our planet that sits between the sun and us. It is being destroyed due to human-made emissions and chemicals.

Hold a piece of tin foil (your ‘protective layer of ozone gas’) to a torch, can you see anything through it? No, because the harmful ‘light’ cannot pass through your ozone. Pierce holes in the piece of tin foil – hold a torch to it, can you see anything through it? Yes, light is passing through, with some of its dangerous UV rays because your ozone layer has been damaged.

Ozone acts as sunscreen and sunglasses for the earth, protecting it from the UV rays of the sun. Smell some suncream, and if it’s sunny today, rub some into your skin and pop on your sunglasses to protect yourself for any harmful UV rays that have not been stopped by the earth’s ozone layer.

Activity 4:

The increased temperature on our planet means that there are changes in the world’s weather patterns and more common extreme weather events such as forest fires, flooding, typhoons, tornadoes and hurricanes.

Make a sound scape of flooding, typhoons and hurricane wind and rain sounds. Slosh water in buckets or bottles, drop pebbles in a washing up bowl of water to make the sound of heavy droplets, make a rice shaker to hear persistent rain sounds, howl like the wind, hold onto your hat and act out getting blown away, stand in front of a fan. Make pattering sounds with your hands on your thighs. Drop rice onto paper to make rain sounds.

Activity 5:

Watch a full sink of water swirl down the plug hole; or swirl a bottle of water, the spiral is a bit like the wind in a tornado.

Try this tornado in a jar science experiment.

At the beginning of the ‘Wizard Of Oz’, Dorothy’s house gets picked up by a tornado. Try spinning and swirling like Dorothy in a windy tornado – don’t get too dizzy. Twirl fabric scarves in the air in a swirling tornado motion.

Activity 6:

Extreme weather can be trouble for birds. Scientists have noticed that when extreme weather happens, fewer birds show up in the places they call home, they avoid the extreme weather occurring there and move to a friendlier area. If birds are moving to other areas because of climate change, they may need our help to protect them in their new habitats.

Different birds may be visiting our gardens and will need food. Try rolling a toilet roll tube in cooking fat and then rolling it in birdseed. Thread ribbon through the tube and hang on a tree. Or, cut and orange in half, eat the contents and then fill the skin with fat and birdseed to hang in a tree.

Activity 7:

Increased extreme temperatures in heatwaves and a lack of rainfall can create drought. If there’s a drought crops can’t grow, there’s not enough water to drink, and animal’s habitats change. Native Americans have traditionally performed a ‘rain dance’ to encourage and bring the rains. You can hear Cherokee rain chants here – join in with the drumming with your palms on a table or box or with your feet stomping on the floor.

Daily activity 50: Yayoi Kusama

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Inspirational Women

Fact of the day:

Yayoi Kusama is a 91 year old Japanese artist who is well-known for her repeating dot patterns. She is still making and exhibiting art and is Japan’s most prominent contemporary artist.

Resources list:

Dot mark maker, paint/pens, paper; household dots and circles; playdoh/clay/plasticine; pen and paper; youtube; mirrors, paint, cardboard box; bright and/or spotty clothes!

Activity 1:

Yayoi’s work regularly features dots. Grab a bingo dabber, felt tip, round stickers, round paintbrush, cotton bud dipped in paint, paint on fingertips, anything that can use to make a spot, and fill a page all the way to all edges with different dots. Cram in as many as you can – big dots , little dots, and colourful dots! If you’ve used paint you can repeat your pattern and double up your dots by folding your paper in half and transferring your wet dots onto the other half of the page.

Activity 2:

Go on a dot hunt at your house – how many spots, circles, and dots can you find hidden in everyday objects? If there’s any that you can bring to a tabletop (plates, toiletries tub lids, selotape rolls, etc) try and fill the table with your dots!

Share your dotty artwork with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

Yayoi loves pumpkins and has made some amazing pumpkin sculptures.  If you have any playdoh, clay, salt dough or plasticine try making some pumpkin shapes of your own, you can then stick a pen end into them to cover them with dot impressions!

If you don’t have anything to model with, try drawing a simple pumpkin shape (or downloading a shape to print out) and cover the whole thing with dots! Try making it black and yellow to resemble the real thing!

Activity 4:

Have a dance and sing to this Polkadot song. Try some of the actions to this song about making dot marks.

Activity 5:

Watch this short clip of Yayoi’s ‘Infinity Mirrors’ art installations (caution, there are some flashing images) in which she fills rooms with mirrors to duplicate and reflect the amount of dots that you can see. Using a couple of mirrors, hold up your art work from activity 1 and see if you can see double, and then triple the amount of dots once you reflect them in mirrors held at each side of the artwork.

Or, flip a cardboard box on its side to create a ‘room’, fill the room with paint dots on the walls, floor and ceiling. Try placing a mirror or two on the ‘wall’ of your cardboard box room – how many dots can you see reflected?

Activity 6:

For the past 43 years Yayoi has lived voluntarily in a mental health hospital, she leaves to go to work in her art studio and then returns to the hospital. Making art is good for her mental health and she believes in the importance of finding things to do that are good for your wellbeing.

Try doing something good for your wellbeing, such as having a Friday Funday Dance-off to these songs.

Activity 7:

Yayoi has a very distinctive style and has almost turned herself, through her clothes, into one of her works of art. Try dressing like Yayoi by wearing bold, colourful or patterned items of clothing, something red on your head, and anything dotty. Send us photos of yourself dressed as her!

Daily activity 49: Ada Lovelace

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Inspirational Women

Fact of the day:

Ada Lovelace was the world’s first computer programmer. She lived in the UK from 1815 – 1852.

Resources list:

Sequences download; Youtube; bag and 20 objects such as coins/buttons/balls; tangram template, felt tips or colouring pencils/crayons; 2 pens.

Activity 1:

Ada Lovelace is the world’s first computer programmer. She was the first person to write a program (a series of commands) that Charles Babbage’s mechanical computer could use to do complicated calculations. Ada believed machines could do more than just maths and correctly predicted many of their future uses, such as creating graphics and music – she predicted the computer!

Writing programmes and coding is about creating sequences to be followed to give an end result. We do this all the time without realising – brushing our teeth, putting our clothes on, making a cup of tea. We have to follow the right instructions in the right order – we can’t put water in the mug if the mug’s still in the cupboard! Have a go at completing these sequences. Can you come up with any action, dance or music sequences of your own?

Activity 2:

Ada’s scientific notes included her understanding of an ‘algorithm’ (step-by-step instructions or rules) for using the Analytical Engine (the machine she and Charles Babbage were interested in). Can you follow step-by step instructions to copy this dance routine? Try it out in time to this song!

Activity 3:

Ada was a brilliant mathmatician. She worked on the ‘Difference Engine’, a machine could automatically add and subtract numbers, which had never been done before.

Do a 20 question sounds quiz. For every question you get right put a ball/coin/button in a bag (add it to the bag), for every question you get wrong take a ball out of the bag (subtract it from the bag). How many balls are in the bag at the end of the quiz?

Activity 4:

As a child, Ada’s Dad nicknamed her his “Princess of Parallelograms”. A parallelogram is a flat shape with opposite sides parallel and equal in length. Have a go at spotting this shape, and making your own colourful parallelogram with the tangram pieces here.

Activity 5:

Ada Lovelace was a musician as well as a scientist, and worked on musical compositions based on numbers.

Can you tap out rhythms in numbers? With a pen in each hand, can you beat out taps of the pen on a tabletop and create a song that uses beats of 3, 2 and 4? For example, left 3 right 3, left 3 right 3, left 2, right 2, left 2, right 2, and repeat. Come up with your own combination of number beats.

Daily activity 48: Maria Sibylla Merian

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Inspirational Women

Fact of the day:

Maria Sibylla Merian was naturalist and scientific illustrator, she was one of the first people to observe insects directly.

Resources list:

Paints and paper; Youtube; paper and scissors, net/hat/bowl/bag to catch in; binoculars or magnifying glass; recycling and selotape.

Activity 1:

Maria Sibylla Merian (1647 – 1717, Germany) was a botanical illustrator, which means she recorded plants and insects by illustrating them in watercolour paints as photography had yet to be invented.

Try painting or drawing some flower and insects, either ones you can see or ones that you could look at online – would be make a good botanical illustrator? Share your illustrations with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

Maria once said “I spent my time investigating insects. At the beginning, I started with silk worms in my home town of Frankfurt. I realized that other caterpillars produced beautiful butterflies or moths, and that silkworms did the same. This led me to collect all the caterpillars I could find in order to see how they changed.” Maria became the first person to ever record the metamorphosis of caterpillar into butterfly.

Watch this fascinating clip of the life-cycle of a caterpillar; can you act some of it out – Munch like a caterpillar; Make a J shape with your body or your arms; Wriggle and twist like a chrysalis; Push out of your shell; Start off scrunched up and small like the butterfly’s wings and then make yourself grow larger and bigger like the wings; Spread and flap your wings and fly like a butterfly; drink from a flower.

Activity 3:

Cut out some butterfly shapes when you have enough, have someone throw them, or release them from above you – in a net (or hat, box, bowl or bag) see how many fluttering butterflies you can catch to investigate like Maria.

Activity 4:

One of Maria’s claims to fame is that she is one of the first naturalists to have studied insects. She recorded and illustrated the life cycles of 186 insect species. Watch this clip that shows the way insects move, wriggle, scurry and ‘dance’ and then try out some of those moves dancing to this song.

Activity 5:

Maria sailed to South America (to places such as Suriname) on scientific explorations to find new and strange creatures. She undertook these scientific expeditions at a time when such trips were unusual and normally undertaken by men only.

Go on an expedition of your own around your house. What would you need if you were packing a bag for a nature trip to Suriname? Dress the part and act out your trek through South American rainforests. Look high, look low, look under things and into things to discover creatures. Go on a hunt for as many green things you can find in your house.

If you have binoculars, a magnifying glass and a garden, you could explore the nature and insects out there too!

Activity 6:

Maria discovered new and strange creatures on her trips. Create your own strange new creatures from your recycling. Tape and glue things together, add some legs and eyes and see what you can create! How would they move? What would they be called? What sounds would they make? What would they smell like? Share your creatures with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Daily activity 47: Grace Darling

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Inspirational Women

Fact of the day:

In 1838 Grace Darling risked her life to rescue shipwrecked mariners off the coast of Northumberland, she safely got all survivors back to shore.

Resources list:

Toilet roll rubes, red and white paint; washi tape/white wax crayon, paint; blue and white objects; white or blue sheet; Youtube; tinfoil and coins; card, pens and ribbon; black sock, cardboard.

Activity 1:

Grace Darling (1815 – 1842) was one of many women around the world who have held the lonely and dangerous job of lighthouse keeper. Many of these women tended the lights for decades, guiding countless ships and sailors to safety.

Make a red and white striped lighthouse model from kitchen roll tubes, or use the tubes to make lighthouse artwork. Or make a painting with washi tape or wax crayon resist for the beams of light from the lighthouse.

Activity 2:

On September 5, 1838, the 450-ton steamer ship ‘Forfarshire’ ran aground near the lighthouse, killing 35 people. Braving rough seas and strong winds, Grace and her father rowed nearly a mile to rescue the shipwreck survivors clinging to the rocks. “At the time I believe I had very little thought of anything but to exert myself to the fullest.”

Make a sea. Collect as many blue and white things from your house – arrange them on a tabletop to create a sea scape. You can add sea creatures and boats if you like.

With another person, flap a sheet create the motions of waves from a calm gentle bobbing wave to a rougher sea. You could do this solo by attaching the sheet to the back of a chair.

Can you do rowing actions in time to this song you can either do them seated or standing.

Activity 3:

Make a tin foil lifeboat to place in a sink, bath, or washing up bowl like this. How many pennies can you rescue and save in your boat without it sinking?

Activity 4:

Grace’s heroism earned her international fame, a medal for bravery from the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and a monetary reward from Queen Victoria.

Create a medal for Grace Darling, or for somebody in your house that you think deserves a reward. It could look however you like, but there’s some ideas herehere and here.

Activity 5:

Grace’s story inspired poems, plays and paintings — and her likeness even graced the packaging of Lifebuoy Soap. .

Draw yourself and your name on packaging for your favourite product or food. Or draw your face, or print out a photo of your face to cut out and stick it on real-life packaging. Your face on soap, a crisp packet,  pack of toilet rolls, on a pizza box!

Activity 6:

Read or have somebody read to you this Grace Darling poem – can you make actions, movements or sounds for the words in bold?

Activity 7:

Grace’s lighthouse was Longstone Lighthouse, located in the remote Farne Islands, Northumberland, England. Today the Farne Islands are a well known wildlife spot where you can spot seals and puffins.

Make yourself a sock puppet Puffin by placing a black sock over your hand and attaching eyes, a cardboard red and black striped cardboard beak and yellow cheeks (it will look like a variation of this or this). Cut out a few cardboard fish, and see how many fish your bird can ‘catch’ in its beak!

Daily activity 46: Harriet Tubman

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Inspirational Women

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

Harriet Tubman was an African American woman who escaped slavery and then helped nearly 300 other slaves escape to freedom too.

Resources list:

Youtube; cut out stars; Ladel or big spoon; paper and pens; card, scissors, glue or jar/bottle, water, glitter and torch; star cutouts, string, stapler/selotape; dressing-up clothes; bun cases, pens, glue; squares of different textured or coloured materials (card, foil, paper, magazines, cloth, etc).

Activity 1:

Harriet Tubman was born into slavery in the USA, but in 1849 she made a stunning escape. Later she returned to guide nearly 300 other slaves to freedom along the Underground Railroad. The Underground Railroad was a network of helpful people, safe houses (called ‘stations’) and secret routes, tunnels and back roads to help slaves escape. The people that helped the slaves escape were called ‘conductors’. Slaves would move from station to station at night, hiding in the woods or sneaking onto trains until they finally reached the north and freedom.

Mark out different areas on your floor that create a route (this could be done with masking tape, or areas numbered with post-it notes, for example). Move between these destinations along your route by hopping or jumping or moving ‘station-to-station’. Have somebody hide objects (such as balled up socks) in these places that you can help rescue, pick up, collect and take with you on your journey ‘North’ to the final destination on your route.

Activity 2:

Harriet Tubman once said, “Always remember you have within you the strength, the patience and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world”.

Reach into the sky with your arms as tall as you can when listening to this song.

Slaves escaping on the Underground Railroad could use the stars to help them navigate. The North Star was used to find north. Repeat activity 1, but instead of jumping station-to-station, cut out stars from card and paper, decorate or colour them and place them on the floor. Move between the stars and follow them on your journey across your room in the direction of the biggest star at the end, the North star.

The North Star can be found in the sky by looking for the constellation (group of stars) known as the Big and Little Dippers. The North Star is the star at the end of the “handle” of the Little Dipper (also referred to as a ‘Ladle’). Play a game of ‘This Is Not A Ladle’ with a ladle or big spoon as a prop to act out your suggestion. This is not a ladle, it’s an arrow pointing my way home. This is not a ladel, it’s a microphone! This is not a ladle it’s an oar to paddle my boat to India.

Try and learn the directions on a compass: north, south, east, and west? Typically these have been remembered by saying ‘Never Eat Shredded Wheat’ – can you come up with your own Mnemonics (using the first letter of each word)? Write them down, illustrate them and share them with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

The journeys that the slaves took were difficult, and Harriet’s great task to guide people to freedom was a huge and brave challenge.

Create a lantern like Harriet’s which she used to guide people along their path to freedom. You could either make a  paper lantern using this template and cutting along the lines. Or shine a torch under a jar or bottle filled with water and glitter.

Have somebody hide a big star in your house; with your lantern, walk a path through your house holding your lantern up to find the North Star. Listen to the song, ‘Follow the Drinking Gourd’ here as you walk your path, the “drinking gourd” alludes to the hollowed out vegetable used by slaves (and other rural Americans) as a water dipper. Used here it is a code name for the Big Dipper star formation, which points to the North as a reminder that if people ever got lost they should walk in the direction of the North Star.

Activity 4:

Cut out lots of stars (from paper, card, or magazines), and attaching them to string, make a garland of stars to stretch across your room to represent the route of the Underground Railroad. i.e. the distance between were the slaves were escaping in the South, to where Harriet successfully transported them to, e.g. Pennsylvania in the North, which was a free state.

Activity 5:

Harriet Tubman used disguises to avoid getting caught on her journeys. She dressed as a man, old woman or middle class free African American. Make your own disguise by wearing unusual clothing, or making yourself a mask.

Activity 6:

Songs were used in everyday life by slaves. Singing served many purposes such as providing rhythm for repetitive manual work, inspiration and motivation. Songs were used as tools to remember and communicate since the majority of slaves could not read. Make repetitive rhythms with your body (clapping, tapping, stomping) in time to this song.

Harriet Tubman and other slaves also used songs as a strategy to communicate. Coded songs contained words giving directions on how to escape also known as ‘signal songs’ or where to meet known as ‘map songs’. For example, if a slave heard ‘Sweet Chariot’ they would know they had to get ready to escape as a band of people were coming to take him to freedom…i.e. The Underground Railroad (sweet chariot) is coming south (swing low) to take the slave to the north or freedom (carry me home). This was one of Tubman’s favorite songs. Listen to the song here and join in singing, or do actions every time you hear ‘Coming for to carry me home’.

Activity 7:

One of the reasons Harriet is special is due to how she repeatedly risked her own life to rescue and help many other people. Her story is an inspiring message of hope, strength, and generosity. Harriet has been compared to a bird soaring across the night sky, fluttering back down to the ground to help others fly too. Make a bird from a bun case like this, soaring in the sky.

Activity 8:

To make sure they didn’t get lost on their journey to freedom, people kept an eye out for freedom quilts on their routes. These quilts were made by kind people who wanted to help others escape, and the quilts contained secret codes and symbols, such as specific patterns that meant ‘you should begin to pack for the journey’ and ‘you should get ready to escape’, or used as ways to alert people towards food, the way north, and danger. Because quilts were such an American tradition, they could be hung on porches or displayed on fences without attracting attention.

Draw a large grid and in each square draw a different pattern or symbol, what would your patterns and symbols mean?

Cut squares and triangles from different coloured or textured materials; glue them down in your own quilt pattern. Share your quilts with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Add on Activity:

Like other enslaved African American children, young Harriet Tubman had to work hard, one of Harriet’s job as a small girl on a plantation was to pick apples. However, as a slave, she wasn’t allowed to eat the apples. Harriet vowed to one day be free and to grow apple trees of her own. When she was grown, she made her escape to the North and gained her freedom, later, when she moved to New York, she finally planted her own apple orchard. If you have the ingredients you could make apple crisps by coring apples, slice them into circles, toss with cinnamon and sugar; then bake until quite dry.

Daily activity 45: Five Ways to Wellbeing – Take Notice

This week’s theme:

Mental Health Awareness Week

Fact of the day:

Studies have shown that being aware of what is taking place around you and savouring ‘the moment’ directly enhances your well-being.

Resources list:

Window Bingo download; paper, watercolour paints, newspaper; tray or plate, sand/gravel or salt/sugar/soil/coffee; peg/pipe cleaner/sticks/lolly stick and wool; colouring in print out; Youtube; shells, beach towel, bowl of water.

Activity 1:

Open the window and take the time to really listen to what you can see or hear both near and far away – tick off anything on our Window Bingo sheet. A winning score is 4 in a row (horizontal, diagonal, or vertical), or 4 or more in total. Try again at a different time of the day and see if you score differently.

Activity 2:

Notice if you’re feeling tense, anxious, or angry. You can take these emotions out and release frustrations on a piece of paper and then create art work from it. Scrunch up a piece of paper tight into a ball, catching all of your emotions in it. Watercolour paint this scrunched ball with lots of different colours (you can open it up and scrunch it again to make sure you’ve covered the white space). When it’s all painted, open up the ball to release the crumpled page and notice how our sadness, frustration and bad thoughts have been turned around, and how you’ve turned them into a beautiful artwork.

Or, focus your frustration into scrunching up pages of newspaper. Use this newspaper ball instead of a brush, and see what beautiful paint patterns you can dab and create.

Activity 3:

A Japanese rock garden (sometimes called a “dry landscape” garden or a ‘zen garden’) has carefully placed arrangements of rocks, water features, moss, pruned trees and bushes, and uses gravel or sand that is raked to represent ripples in water.

In a tray or on a plate, try making your own miniature tabletop zen garden. If you don’t have sand, you could use soil, sugar, coffee, or salt. Using a fork, rake the sand into different wave or ripple patterns in slow, controlled motions – these motions can become meditative and relaxing. Try listening to this ‘zen’ music and notice the slow fluid patterns that you’re making in the sand and the calm actions that you’re using to create them.

You could also create a similar effect with your fingertip in a plate of uncooked rice or cous cous grains.

Activity 4:

It’s important to notice and recognise our worries and take them seriously. In Guatemala people create ‘worry dolls’ in the image of a Mayan princess who was gifted the power to solve any problem a human could worry about. Worry dolls are used by people who are feeling fear or worry. People tell their doll about the things that are bothering them, then hide the doll under their pillow during the night. In the morning when they wake some of the worry is said to have been taken away by the worry doll. Worry dolls can be used to ease the mind or make wishes on too, or can be used as an imaginary, but trustworthy “listener” or “contact person”.

Make a worry doll who you could talk to from a peg wound with wool, pipe cleaners wound with wool, small bits of twigs, or a lolly stick. Who else can you talk to if you have any worries?

Activity 5:

It’s important to think positively, talk about how we feel, and to remind ourselves of things that we know are good about ourselves. Try some mindful colouring in with this colouring in sheet that you can download and print out. Take your time and slowly colour in the positive words that you think apply to you.

Activity 6:

Doing gentle, peaceful activities can help us be ‘in the moment’, enjoying what we’re quietly engaging with.

Try listening to a gentle storytelling visualisation such as this one about a walk on the beach. Try and imagine you’re really there, if you have any seashells you can hold on to them, or hold them to your ear as you listen, or you could wrap a beach towel around you, or you could put your feet in a bowl of ‘sea’ water or a bucket of sand as you listen.

Try some calm Tai Chi exercises (from 1.28minutes)

Add on Activity:

If you have plant at home, take notice of them. Do they look like they need watering or looking after?

We refer to being Zen as a way to calm down or relax through chaotic times; to be Zen is to embrace simplicity. Try having a de-clutter – are your drawers a mess, take the time to sort, fold, and organise them to help you feel on-top of things. Is your desk messy, take the time to clear it and feel calmer.

Daily activity 44: Five Ways to Wellbeing – Give

This week’s theme:

Mental Health Awareness Week

Fact of the day:

Individuals who report a greater interest in helping others are more likely to rate themselves as happy.

Resources list:

Paper, pens, stapler; card, paper, paints, chalk; camera/video camera/mobile phone; lotion; paper.

Activity 1:

Make a kindness journal to record the things you do, such as the people that you help, the things you have done to make them laugh, or draw the people have been kind to each day. Also, record your gratitude and write about or draw pictures of the people that help and are kind to you. You could also note the things, foods, places and people that you are thankful for and that make you happy. You could celebrate your own successes – what have you done well this week, what are you proud of? You can write or draw anything at all in your journal – it’s yours.

Your journal can be as simple as pieces of A4 paper folded in half to form a book and stapled together – but give it a fancy front cover! On the cover you could do a mindful doodle and then colour in the spaces and shapes you have created.

Activity 2:

Make thank you cards, or display a thank you poster for those visiting your door, window, drive, or path (family, postmen and women, volunteers, refuse workers, delivery people, support staff, milkman, etc). They can look any way you like, but here are some ideas: poster, signs, or poster.

Activity 3:

Make a silly video to send to somebody to cheer them up – act out your best silly walks from last week (#38), or your best silly jokes, or sing a silly song, draw yourself a funny mask to wear! Or take some silly photos to send to somebody – what’s the silliest face you can make, and what’s the silliest costume you can wear? We could share them for you too, put them on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 4:

Learn how to give someone a hand massage, once you’ve taught others how relaxing it is they may be able to give one back. Or, you could give yourself a hand massage. You could try listening to some relaxing sounds as you do it.

Activity 5:

Act out some random acts of kindness. For example: Smile at everybody you see today. Give compliments. Leave a secret kind note for somebody. Make today a no-complaining day. Cheer up a friend, in person or over the phone by talking to them. Help somebody before they ask you. There’s more ideas here too.

Make a ‘fortune teller’, like here or here to decide which random act of kindness to do next! Write each kind act under a different flap!

Daily activity 43: Five Ways to Wellbeing – Keep Learning

This week’s theme:

Mental Health Awareness Week

Fact of the day:

Continued learning through life enhances self-esteem.

Resources list:

Paper, pens, paints; bananas, food processor, freezer; Youtube; paper, scissors, paper clip; paper or card, decorating bits-and-bobs; fruit and veg.

Activity 1:

Let’s try learning something new today!

Did you know… Bananas grow upside-down, or technically, we peel them upside-down. Naturally, they grow outward from their stems, but that means their bottoms actually face the sky. As they get bigger, the fruits turn toward the sun, forming that distinctive curve. Try doing things upside down – can you write your name so that it’s upside down – this is tricky – spin your paper the right way round to see how you did! If it’s safe to do so, can you stick a piece of paper under your table, lie on your back and draw or paint a picture upside down?

Did you know if you freeze a banana until solid, then whiz it up in a blender or food processor, it gets creamy and a little gooey, just like ice cream? Try making your own banana icecream!

Learn the actions to the ‘Go Bananas’ song?

Activity 2:

Did you know… there are there are 620 different species of birds in the UK?

Can you learn to identify any of the birds that you can see or hear from your window? You can identify them by sight and watching their behaviour, and by the sounds they make. Try an online bird identifier or a birdsong identifier here or here. There’s even a fancy birdsong app  if you’re techy.

Make a whirly bird to drop and see fall through the air like a bird coming in to land.

Activity 3:

We can challenge ourselves to try or learn new things, if we do them slowly and gradually we can build our confidence in doing things that may have seemed scary or impossible at first.

Set yourself some goals during lockdown. Can you learn 5 words from another language? Can you learn the words to 3 songs? Can you learn how to make a couple of new recipes? Can you learn some of the flags of the world? Can you learn something new everyday about the people you live with?

Can you set yourself a goal that is to do with looking after yourself… Can you practice your calm breathing techniques twice a week? Can you search for 3 songs that you find relaxing that you can keep for times when you might need them? Will you get some fresh air every single day? Will you set a goal of stretching or exercising every day? Will you eat 5 pieces of fruit or vegetables everyday? Can you celebrate one thing every single day that you’re proud of yourself for doing? Can you do something kind everyday for somebody else?

Activity 4:

Can you write out and decorate a ‘Wellbeing Action Plan’ poster for yourself, perhaps using your small challenges and goals that you’ve set? e.g. Once a week I will … e.g. If I get stressed I will … e.g. If I feel sad I will …

Activity 5:

Did you know… it is recommended that we should aim to drink for 6-8 glasses of water each day – around 1.5 litres (water, lower fat milk and sugar-free drinks, including tea and coffee, all count). And that we should eat 5 portions of fruit and veg every day. This will help keep us healthy and alert.

Make yourself a wall chart or poster for you to mark off and record how many glasses of water and how many fruit and veg portions you have today or this week, so that you can keep a tally. Decorate it with lots of fruit and vegetable drawings or images from magazines collaged.

You could come up with a slogan to shout every time you add something to the tally. Take a listen to and have a dance to this Tutti Fruitti song – you could try ‘A-Wop-Bop-A-Loo-Bop-A-Lop-Bam-Boom’ as your celebratory slogan, if you can wrap your tongue around saying it first – give it a practice! Or, you could do some celebratory ‘Mashed Potato’ dance moves!

Explore fruit and veg with all of your senses. Ask somebody to put some fruit or veg in a bag or box, then blindfolded can you touch the fruit to identify them – are they smooth? Bumpy? Soft? Hard? Long? Round? Can you work out what they are? Still blindfolded can you smell each one – can you work out what they are, unpeeled? Or then peeled? Do they sound like anything when they’re tapped or shaken gently? Finally, what do they taste and look like – by this point you’ve probably worked out what they all are! Draw a picture of all of the fruit and veg you’ve identified!

Daily activity 42: Five Ways to Wellbeing – Be Active

Fact of the day:

Regular physical activity is associated with a higher rate of wellbeing across all age groups.

Resources list:

Paperback book, stones, chair; Youtube; Paper, pens or paints; bubbles, feather; newspaper, bowls/baskets/tubs.

Activity 1:

The art of ‘Zen’ is all about creating balance so that we feel in control of our lives. Practice balancing your body, can you stand on one foot and then change over, can you sit balancing one elbow on the chair arm, can you balance stood on your tip toes?

Can you balance different objects, such as making a pile of stones one on top of the other to create a tower – how tall can you make it before it loses balance and tipples over?

Can you balance different objects on yourself  – can you balance a book on your head; can you balance a book on your head while you’re balancing on one leg; can you balance a book on your head while you walk around the room or crouching and standing up, or dancing to a song; how long can you keep it on there – time yourself!

What’s the strangest object in your house that you can *safely* balance on your head – send us photos! You can share them on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

To help build confidence and self-esteem and to make us feel powerful and in control try changing your posture and do some Power Poses. Try holding your hands on your hips with your head held high and your chest out like Wonderwoman or Superman for 2 minutes. How does it make you feel?

What poses of your own can you do that make you feel brave, unique, confident, strong or kind? Try saying ‘I am … [brave/unique/etc]’ out loud when you hold your pose to remind yourself of how great you are. Or you could have a pose that says ‘I try my best’, ‘when I’m stressed I remember to breathe’ or ‘it will be OK’ – say these words out loud and be proud of yourself.

Have a dance to this song and every time she says ‘Roar’, show your power pose! Or, this song and whenever he says ‘I won’t back down’ show your power pose!

Activity 3:

Try doing some exercise that gets your blood pumping a little bit, getting oxygen all around your body and to your brain. Try this workout to music, or there’s a 10 minute workout you could follow here. Or you could jog on the spot, or step up and down on your bottom couple of steps of your staircase.

Try dressing up for your workout, like in this superhero inspired workout! Kapow!

Try seated, lower intensity ‘Love To Move’ workouts here, here, and here.

If you’re feeling up to it, have a more strenuous Baked Beans workout here.

Try some stretching exercises here. Or chair Pilates here.

Activity 4:

It’s been said that if ever you feel ‘stuck’ you should draw spirals as it keeps you moving forwards. On a piece of paper draw or paint different coloured and sized spirals. Can you also draw imaginary spirals in the air with your nose, toes, fingers, elbows and tongue?

Activity 5:

Try some physical relaxation techniques. You might not need to use these techniques today, but learning them today means you may remember them for when you need them in the future.

If you have a bubble wand practice slow controlled breathing by slowly blowing bubbles. Blow too hard and the mixture will not form bubbles; blow too gently and the bubble will not leave the wand; blowing bubbles well uses the same sort of controlled breathing that we need to do when we feel angry, scared, worried, or upset. It will help calm us down. If our worries were bubbles they would float away and pop, we don’t always need to carry our worries around, we can think about them lifting away from us into the air as we slowly breathe.

Choose a feather you really like. This feather can help us practice breathing techniques too and can help calm us down. Slowly blow on a feather calmly from one side then the other and see how it moves and wafts. Try making slow and gently patterns in the feather with your controlled breath.

After you’ve created a slow breath, keep it up and listen to relaxation music. Close your eyes, focus on your breath and practice deeply listening, filling your mind with the sounds and feel how relaxing they are. Stay quiet like this for as long as you like.

Activity 6:

Make yourself a scrunched up newspaper ball. Create target zones by placing pans, bins, baskets, bowls, tubs, trugs, bags for life, etc on the floor, each target is worth different points – decide what these are. See how high a score you can get by throwing your ball for 10 minutes into the target zones. If it’s too easy, move the target zones further away from you or use smaller targets. Can you throw two balls at the same time? If you’re really good, try throwing the balls over your shoulder while you face in the opposite direction!!

Add on Activity:

Throw yourself a feel good bedroom disco! Put on your favourite songs and let your hair down with a good dance. Listening to things that make us happy, and moving about can help to cheer us up. See if anybody else you live with wants to join you!

Daily activity 41: Five Ways to Wellbeing – Connect

This week’s theme:

Mental Health Awareness Week

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

Feeling close to, and valued by, other people is a fundamental human need.

Resources list:

Youtube; sticks, leaves, petals, paper, colouring or paining materials; radio website.

Activity 1:

‘Being Zen’ is something that people say to describe peacefulness, but it’s also about simplicity. Such as looking at simple things we can do to change things in our lives, or thinking about what simple things can we do to help and connect with other people. One way that we can do this is to learn some Makaton that may make communication between people easier. Try learning these signs for simple communication.

Can you learn a couple of the signs to this song have a good dance while you’re at it!

Activity 2:

Being outdoors in a garden, an outside area, or on a short walk for exercise can be really good for our well-being and can help us connect with nature. If you don’t have the opportunity to do any gardening you can still get creative, you could compose a collage of natural items you may find in your garden or walk, or try leaf rubbing or flower pressing.

Head outside to collect some bits of nature (leaves, feathers, twigs, stones, petals) and try out some Nature Doodling, leaves make excellent hairdos! Share them with us to make others smile, you can share on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Head outside to collect materials for a game of Nature Naughts & Crosses maybe with leaves versus stones (you’ll need 5 of each), or petals versus berries.

Make a nature rainbow by drawing or painting a rainbow, take it outside, or hold it up at the window, to match the colours with natural objects (such as flowers, trees, animals and rocks). Try to find natural objects for all the colours in your rainbow.

Activity 3:

Sometimes, if we feel lonely listening to the radio and hearing voices can help us feel more connected to the world. On this website you can spin the globe and see loads of dots. Each of these dots represents a different radio station from all over the world. If you centre the circle over a dot you can hear what that station are playing or saying. You can hear voices in all different languages and some weird and wonderful songs and music! Spend some time zipping across the world one radio station at a time. Can you find any stations that are playing songs you know? Have a dance or a sing if you come across something familiar or something you like, and think about all of the different people in the world and how someone else is at home listening to the exact same thing as you right now.

Activity 4:

Connect with your Purple Patch group – Make a poster saying ‘hello’ to your whole group. Take a photo of it, share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you! Some of your friends and purple staff will be able to see it from their homes, and might even send you a message back.

Activity 5:

Write and decorate a letter, or make a card for somebody you know. Post it to let them know you’re thinking of them. You might even get one back!

Add on Activity:

Connect with others’ voices by listening to three free meditations here.

Daily activity 40: Van Gogh, Jimi Hendrix, Eurovision, & Florence Nightingale

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News… This Week In History

Fact of the day:

The week starting 11th May has been a very eventful one in history.

Resources list:

Paper, paint or felt tips; Youtube; Tea towel, thin card, cape, sunglasses, tin foil, mirror; triangular bandage or tablecloth or piece of fabric; poster download.

Activity 1:

On 15th May 1990 ‘Portrait of Doctor Gachet’, painted in 1890 by artist Vincent van Gogh, sold for $82.5 million.

Draw a portrait of somebody in your house, or look in a mirror and draw a self portrait. Try colouring it in a Van Gogh style, i.e. with a series of dots or dashes of his paintbrush rather than full colouring in.

Activity 2:

On 12th May 1967 the “Are You Experienced” album by the Jimi Hendrix Experience was first released; it became one of the most influential debut albums ever made.

Have a listen and a dance to some of the songs, like The Wind Cries Mary or Hey Joe. How do they make you feel?

Make a gig poster featuring either yours or Jimi Hendrix’s name; incorporate bright bright colours, and 60s psychedelic swirls, rays and patterns like these backgrounds here, here, or here.

Activity 3:

Jimi Hendrix famously played guitar with his left hand; he modified right-handed guitars or played a right-handed guitar simply flipped over (treble E at the top). Try doing things with your non-dominant hand; can you brush your hair, brush your teeth, write your name, draw a picture?

Activity 4:

Eurovision ordinarily happens this week in May (this year the final was due to be on Saturday 16th May). Have a listen to some of these past smash hits and have a Eurovision dance party! [Warning: some of these performances contain flashing lights] Bobbysocks (Norway, 1985), Måns Zelmerlöw (Sweden, 2015), Jedward (Ireland, 2011), Loreen (Sweden, 2012), Dana International (Israel, 1998), Lulu (UK, 1969), Lordi (Finland, 2006), Conchita Wurst (Austria, 2014), Scooch (UK, 2007) and ABBA (Sweden, 1974). Do you recognise any of the songs?

Can you find the above countries on a map?

Can you do the Brotherhood of Man dance?

Can you copy any of the moves to ‘Making Your Mind Up’? Try tucking a teatowel into your waistband to whip off in time with Bucks Fizz!

Activity 5:

As well as it being a song contest, there have been some magnificent costumes on Eurovision over the years. Make yourself a tall cone hat to rival Moldova’s outstanding entry from 2011!  Wear a cape (or a towel, blanket or sheet cape) and join in with the Czech Republic’s 2009 entry. Or wear some sunglasses, make a tinfoil star for your head, and grab a mirror to move to the beat of Ukraine’s utterly glorious 2007 entry!

Activity 6:

On 12th May 1820 Florence Nightingale was born. She became a famous nurse who spent her life improving the standard of healthcare in Britain and beyond. She became famous during the Crimean War when she worked abroad at a British army hospital. The soldiers called her ‘the lady with the lamp’ because she would work all night, comforting those in need. Florence helped to save many lives.

Practice putting a sling on the arm of somebody that you live with. If you don’t have a triangular bandage try using a table cloth or piece of fabric. Or, ask somebody to put a sling on you!

You could download and colour in a rainbow poster here or here or make one of your own to put in your window to say thank you to nurses, carers, and healthcare workers like Florence who are working today.

Add on Activity:

If you have the ingredients try some euro party snacks, such as cheese, sausage, olives, dips, pastries, pizza and pasta from around Europe.

Daily activity 39: George Lucas

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News… This Week In History

Fact of the day:

On 14th May 1944 George Lucas was born In California, USA.

Resources list:

Newspaper or tinfoil, cups, beakers, tubs or bins; Youtube; cardboard, scissors, glue, pattern; card or paper plats, paints or felt tips, scissors, string or thread; newspaper and selotape; red carpet outfit!

Activity 1:

George Lucas is a film producer and director, his best known films include the Indiana Jones movies.

In ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’ Indiana Jones is chased by a rolling boulder. Practice rolling your own boulders into targets. Roll up large ‘boulders’ of newspaper or tinfoil. Make some targets, such as beakers or bins on their sides. Can you roll your boulders into the targets? If you find this easy, move your targets further away.

The first Indiana Jones films were released in the 1980s. Try this 1980s music quiz – do you recognise any of the songs? Have a dance to any that you like!

Activity 2:

Indiana Jones’s biggest fear is snakes. Make a Twirling Snake – on a paper plate or circle of card, draw a spiral that forms the snake. Hang your snake with string or cotton from its tail, but don’t get it anywhere near Indiana Jones!

Activity 3:

George Lucas created the two Star Wars trilogies. Try doing Yoda, Darth Vader, R2D2, or Chewbacca impressions! Try marching around your house like a Stormtrooper in time to their marching music.

Activity 4:

Make a paper lightsaber from newspaper, see here. But don’t make any scissor cuts into your lightsaber.

With your lightsabre, try some slow and steady Tai Chi moves.

Activity 5:

In the Empire Strikes back, Han Solo is frozen in Carbonite.. Have a boogie to this song but can you strike a pose, and freeze as if frozen in Carbonite everytime you hear the word ‘Star’. Or, can you remain frozen in your pose for the entire duration of this disco Star Wars song  – it’ll be tricky to keep still, you could time how long you last!

Activity 6:

George Lucas has been nominated for hundreds of awards over the years and has won four Academy Awards, or Oscars! Make a cardboard Oscars award (it could look something like the real thing or could be an awards statue of your own design). What would you award people in your house for, or yourself for? Best use of vegetables in a meal? Best singer in a lockdown musical? Best costume for a weekday? Best hairdo given the circumstances? Or just best friend, biggest smile, loudest laugh, or best listener?

Dress up in your fanciest clothes and have a red carpet event to award the awards. Walk the red carpet, people are going to be taking your photos so pose, pose, pose! Send us your photos from the red carpet! You can share them on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Add on Activity:

It looks a bit tricky, but if you’re up to the challenge, make yourself an Indiana Jones hat with these instructions. Or make a Star Wars X Wing.

Daily activity 38: Monty Python

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News… This Week In History

Fact of the day:

On this week in May 1969 British comedy troupe Monty Python formed.

Resources list:

Youtube; riddles download; 2 plastic plant pots/beakers/bowls; paper and pens; stop motion app; old magazines, scissors and glue; cardboard and pens, stick.

Activity 1:

On the 11th May 1969 British comedy troupe Monty Python formed, made up of Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin.

In their honour, it’s time to practice your Ministry Of Silly Walks walks! What’s the silliest walk you can do? What other daft ministries could you create? Ministry of silly waves? Ministry of silly noises? Ministry of silly faces?

Activity 2:

In the film, ‘Monty Python and the Holy Grail’, the bridgekeeper asks the characters to answer riddles to get over a bridge. Have a go at solving these Riddles. Can you come up with any riddles of your own? Share them with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

Whenever there was a horse in Monty Python they used coconut shells to mimic its hooves. See from 1.15minutes here. Try and find something in your house that would make the sound of horses hooves – two plastic bowls, plant pots, or tumblers clapped together, maybe? Trot around your house in ‘full equine motion’!!

Activity 4:

Have a sing along to Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life and practice your whistling skills!

What things make you feel happy and hopeful? Make a list and decorate them with happy faces.

Is laughter important to help you feel good? Do you know any jokes that you could tell? Share them with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Try a spot of laughter yoga.

Activity 5:

Monty Python featured some surreal stop-motion animations. – you could make some of these of your own if you have the stop-motion technology such as such as free software such as this (for Android) or this (for Apple).

You could create some collaged scenes using magazine images to create mash-up characters, or you could play with perspective creating collages such as extra large cats stood on top of tiny cars, or whatever you want in your surreal collage artwork!

Or, you could create a giant foot from carboard to attach to a stick and play with perspective to squish distant objects with it! (See here! ) If you get any good photos or videos of your squishings share them with us! You can put them our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Add on Activity:

Check out this news article about people posting a sign asking their neighbours to commence silly walking past their house! Could you put up something similar to bring a bit of joy to your street or neighbours?

How many times can you say ‘Spam’?

Daily activity 37: Cats the musical

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News… This Week In History

Fact of the day:

On this week in May 1981 Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical “Cats” (based on poetry by T. S. Eliot) first premiered on the West End.

Resources list:

Poem; Card, pens, glue/tape, paper plate; Youtube; Paper and pens.

Activity 1:

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical ‘Cats’ (based on poetry by T. S. Eliot) tells the story of a tribe of cats called the Jellicles.

Can you do any actions or act like any of the characters from ‘Cats’ based on their descriptions?

Activity 2:

Make a cat headband. It could look like this or this. Or you could make a cat mask like this. Wearing it, practice acting like a cat; you could try out your cat purrs, tiptoe or prowl like a cat, swish your tail, wash your face with your paws, Miaow, get low before jumping high. Act out all your graceful cat moves listening to this song.

Activity 3:

Try some ‘Cats’ yoga poses. Letters A-L can be seen here and M-Z here. Try spelling with your body using the ‘Cats’ alphabet moves – can you spell your name? Can you spell Purple?

Activity 4:

The musical is based in the poems of T.S Elliott. In the poem ‘The Naming of Cats’, Elliott writes that a cat must have three different names. Read, or ask someone to read about these 3 names here.

What 3 cat names do you have? 1. What is your sensible, normal, everyday name? 2. What is your fancy over-the-top name? You could try using a name generator for this. 3. What is the secret name you belive you should be called, perhaps a name you’ve always liked, or your nickname, or a name that somebody special calls you?

Draw these cats, complete with names and share them with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you! Or you could write out your fancy cat name and decorate it!

What actions would all 3 of your cat aliases do? How would they move? How would they talk?

Activity 5:

Bustopher Jones is described as wearing a “fastidious black coat and white spats”. Spats are shoes often worn by tap dancers. Try out some simple tap dancing moves here. Or try tapping out the beat of this song from Cats on different parts of your body.

Add on Activity:

Lots of snippets from the musical can be viewed on Youtube here.

Daily activity 36: Amy Johnson

This week’s theme:

Mysterious News… This Week In History

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

On 11th May 1930 Amy Johnson started on her attempted solo flight from England to Australia, some 10,000 miles away, in her ‘Gipsy Moth’ plane.

Resources list:

Youtube; paper and pens; moth template, coloured paper or paints/felt tips, string, stapler or tape; drinking straw, paper, scissors, tape; water in a bowl or bottle, dried rice or lentils in a tub.

Activity 1:

Amy Johnson was a 22 year old aviatrix (a female pilot) from England, she was the first woman to fly to Australia. Her flight took 19 days and although she failed to beat the previous record that had been set for this journey, her time for a portion of her trip (Croyden to India) set a new record in the history of aviation.

There was a song specially composed to commemorate her flight. Hear it here!

Can you sing along to the lyrics?

Try out some Charleston dance moves from the era along to the music.

Or, can you zoom around your room with arms outstretched like a plane? You can hear plane noises at the start of the recording, what plane noises can you make?

Activity 2:

Amy took an Emergency Kit with her on her journey. In it was: Flask of tea, Gun, First aid kit, Hip flask, Boiled sweets, Matches, Spanner.

What would you take as your emergency kit on a solo flight to Australia? Draw your supplies and share with us what your essentials would be, you can share on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

Amy’s plane was called the Gipsy Moth. The manufacturer of the plane, Geoffrey de Havilland was a lepidopterist (which means he was fascinated by moths!) In tribute he named many of his planes after them, such as the Puss, Tiger, Hawk and Gipsy.

Can you make a garland of flying moths to track Amy’s journey from the UK at one side of your room to Australia on the other side? You can use this moth image as a template to copy, trace, or to cut out multiple moth shapes from coloured card around. Or you could print out some moths and colour them in. Staple or tape your moths onto a piece of string to stretch the distance of your journey.

Activity 4:

How did science and engineering keep Amy’s plane in the air? Try throwing an ordinary straw through the air and measure how far it travels. Now have a go at adapting your straw to make it glide in the air for as long as possible! Just like Amy you’ll need to get your engineering head on for this one! See these instructions for all of the science!

Activity 5:

When Amy set off on her flight to Australia in 1930 nobody knew who she was. By the time she returned she was a celebrity across the world! The media were fascinated by her incredible achievements, especially by the fact that she was a woman. In the 1930s men dominated the fields of aviation and exploration and attitudes towards women such as what they should do with their lives, even how they should dress, were very strict and often decided for them by other people. Amy was a powerful striking figure for the age, standing up for her beliefs, following her own path, and rebelling against the attitudes of the time.

Make a magazine front cover featuring yourself as the celebrity. Draw yourself as the cover star. What would your celebrity magazine be called – write it large at the top. What would the headline about yourself be? For inspiration you could look at some of the covers of TIME magazine here!

Activity 6:

Amy had to land mid-way as her plane had been badly damaged from facing a monsoon! Teachers and pupils from a local school repaired her plane by sewing twenty men’s shirts to cover the wing!

Recreate a monsoon soundscape soundscape. In a washing-up bowl create water sounds splashing, pouring and swishing. Use liquid in a bottle to make rain noises. Put some rice or lentils in a Tupperware box and rattle it so sound like the rain dashing onto the plane.

Add on Activity:

This menu was taken from a souvenir booklet made for a luncheon held at the Savoy Hotel in London in 1930 to commemorate and celebrate Amy’s famous flight to Australia. If you have the ingredients could you recreate any of the meals? Could you create a posh meal for yourself?

Daily Activity 35: Cleopatra

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – Ancient Egypt

Fact of the day:

Cleopatra was the last pharaoh of Ancient Egypt

Resources list:

Card or paper plate, paints/pens/crayons, toilet roll tube; large cardigan/pillow cases/fabric/sheet; card; grapes, you tube.

Activity 1:

Cleopatra has a very distinctive style. Dress as her for the day! Create a Collar for around your neck, decorate an Armlet for your forearm, and a Circlet for around your head; the ones worn by royalty tend to have snakes or animals at the front. You could also download this template to colour in strips to piece together to make a Circlet.

Activity 2:

Cleopatra knew how to make an entrance. She was dramatic and often used clever stagecraft; she once wrapped herself in a carpet to sneak herself into a private room! She is said to have arrived once on a golden barge adorned with purple sails and rowed by oars made of silver; she had been made up to look like the goddess Aphrodite, and she sat beneath a gilded canopy while attendants dressed as cupids fanned her and burned sweet-smelling incense!

Try making a dramatic entrance – what would you wear, what would you arrive with, what music would you play, what would you say if you were making a surprise entrance into a room?

Activity 3:

Cleopatra identified with the mythological Egyptian goddess, Isis. As goddess of life and magic, Isis protected women and children, and healed the sick. Her symbols were the ankh, her wings, and her throne headdress.

Make yourself some ‘Isis wings’ – these could be made by wearing a big baggy cardigan, a sheet, putting your arms in pillow cases, or attaching some fabric to wooden spoons. Have a dance along to this video or do your own wing dance to this song.

Activity 4:

Cleopatra put her face on Egypt’s coins to assert her authority and show she was in charge.

Make a coin cut-out with your own face on it. What message or catch-phrase would your coin have written on it about you or how great a ruler you are?

Activity 5:

Cleopatra was known for her beauty in the ancient world, it is said that took baths in donkey milk to preserve the beauty and youth of her skin. The legend says that 700 donkeys were needed to provide the quantity of milk necessary for her daily bath!! Cleopatra is also said to have had grape facials to keep her skin beautiful – if you have them, crush up some grapes and put them on your cheeks, close your eyes and relax to some Egyptian music.

Add on Activity:

If you have the ingredients, try making these sweet treats that would have satisfied Cleopatra’s reported sweet tooth.

Daily Activity 34: Egyptian deities and legends

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – Ancient Egypt

Fact of the day:

Ancient Egyptians believed in more than 2,000 deities! They had gods for everything, from dangers to chores!

Resources list:

Paper and pens; card; Youtube; green clothing; card, tinfoil, string, glue, biros, paint; card, wire or pipe cleaners, buttons/bells/metal washers/ring pulls, Y twig.

Activity 1:

Ancient Egyptians had gods for everything, each had different responsibilities and needed to be worshipped so that life could be kept in balance. As you can see here many deities had the head of one animal and the body of another. Draw some mixed-up deities of your own by swapping different creatures about, maybe draw a bears head with frogs legs, a dog’s body with a cat’s face, a cow’s face with spiders legs, or any combination of your own! If you have any old magazines, cut out one person’s or animal’s head and glue it on somebody else’s body. Take a picture and share with us your weird and wonderful deities; you can share them on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Make yourself an animal mask to give yourself the face of a deity.

Activity 2:

Ra, the Sun God was the most important God to the Egyptians. Egyptians believed Ra created all forms of life, and he was the supreme ruler of all Gods. Ra is depicted as a man with a hawk’s head and headdress.

Try move No.1 of the Sun Salutation yoga poses here or try the seated Sun Salutations here.

Activity 3:

Sobek was the Crocodile God of power and strength, he was one of the most prominent Gods of Egyptian mythology. Sobek is depicted an ordinary man with the head of a crocodile and he wears a crown with ram horns. Egyptians kept live crocodiles in temples and pools to honor Sobek.

Dress in any crocodile-green clothes you have and have a crocodile rock-out to this song; you could snap your crocodile jaw shut by clapping your extended hand and arms together, or build up your power and strength by dancing whilst holding cans of beans!

Activity 4:

Thoth was popular as the Egyptian God of wisdom, knowledge, moon, and magic. Thoth was the inventor of hieroglyphics and patron of science, scribes, and writing. Thoth is depicted in ancient Egyptian art as a human with the head of an Ibis.

Practice slow moon-walking to this song.

Activity 5:

An amulet is an object believed to have certain positive properties, like a good luck charm. They were worn a lot in Ancient Egypt to transfer their powers directly to the owner. Often amulets were pierced or featured a loop, which allowed their use as pendants on a necklace, for example.

Make your own good luck pendent using string glued into a pattern on a card disc, with tin foil to cover it over, see here. A particular good-luck symbol in ancient Egypt was the Scarab beetle. The rich colors used in the scarab design had meaning: Red signified the god, Ra, Touches of yellow were used to symbolize the sun and the desert, Blue symbolized the Nile, Green was the symbol for growth. You could make a beetle design on your amulet, and colour the foil using these colours of biro. If you don’t cover the amulet with foil, you could pain the string and cardboard in these special colours.

Activity 6:

In Ancient Egyptian art, goddesses were depicted playing the ‘Sistrum’, an ancient instrument.

Make your own version of this instrument (similar to a rattle) it could look like thisthis, or this, using anything like buttons, jingle bells, beads, rig pulls, or metal washers.

Daily Activity 33: Pyramids & Hieroglyphics

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – Ancient Egypt

Fact of the day:

Most Ancient Egyptian pyramids were built as tombs for pharaohs (rulers of Ancient Egypt) and their families. To date, over 130 pyramids have been discovered in Egypt.

Resources list:

Print out of pyramid model, scissors, glue; household objects to build with; squares of different textures; cucumber or apple, salt, sugar, baking powder; paper and pens.

Activity 1:

Pharaohs built great tombs for themselves in pyramids so they could live well in the afterlife. The Pyramid of Khufu at Giza is the largest Egyptian pyramid. This incredible structure weighs as much as 16 Empire State buildings!

Make a model pyramid of your own.

See here for some crazy home built pyramids; can you build a pyramid structure out of unexpected things you have at  your home? Share your photos with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

A pyramid is a 3D shape made up of 4 triangles and a square base. It has 5 faces and 8 edges. Can you count them on the model you made? How many triangles can you spot in your house/garden?

Cut out a bunch of right-angle triangles, all the same size as each other (any square piece of paper cut in two diagonally will make a right angle triangle; try 10cm squares, or post it notes cut diagonally). You can cut these out from different textured materials (e.g. card, foil, kitchen roll, sand paper, coloured plastic bags, fabric). Put the  triangles together (tesselate) and see what other shapes you can make. Rule: Sides touching each other must be the same length! Can you slide, flip and rotate your pieces to make a square from 4 triangles? A triangle from 4 triangles? See here and here for other shapes ideas.

Activity 3:

Pyramids are tombs where Egyptian Pharaohs were laid to rest after they had died. The afterlife was incredibly important to the Egyptians. They believed that by preserving a dead person’s body and organs (which were preserved in separate special ‘canopic’ jars buried beside the body) then their soul would live on in the after-life forever. This process of preservation was called mummification. Part of the mummification process involved taking the moisture from the bodies before they were wrapped. Try an Experiment to see how different substances can dry things out.

Activity 4:

Tutankhamun had 5,398 different objects buried with him to ensure that he remained strong, wealthy, and well fed in the afterlife. These objects included a leopard-skin cloak, four game boards, six chariots, 30 wine jars, and 46 bows.

Gather together or draw a picture of your most favourite precious things that you always like to pack with you wherever you go.

Activity 5:

Tombs and pyramids were lined with mysterious engravings called hieroglyphs, each hieroglyph was a character of the ancient Egyptian writing system. The Egyptian alphabet contained more than 700 hieroglyphs!

Can you spell your name by drawing it in hieroglyphs? Use this alphabet to help distinguish the correct letters and symbols.

Can you use the alphabet to crack this Hieroglyphic message?

Hieroglyphs were often written top-to-bottom on a ‘cartouche’ (an ornament bearing an inscription). Make your own cartouche bookmark.

Add on Activity:

If you have the ingredients, make a rice crispie pyramid, see here!

Daily Activity 32: Pharaohs

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – Ancient Egypt

Fact of the day:

Pharaoh is the common title of the monarchs of ancient Egypt

Resources list:

Paper and pens; paper, tin foil, biros, soft book, glue; card, perfume, cotton wool; you tube; salt/sweet/sour/bitter food or drink to taste.

Activity 1:

If you were a Pharaoh and a leader of a country, what would your rules be? Write them down on a ‘Papyrus Scroll’ and read them to your subjects!

How strict can you look? Try pulling some strict and stern facial expressions. You could download and print this Pharaoh colouring page and add in what you think a strict and commanding Pharaoh’s facial expressions would be like

Activity 2:

Gold was a very important material and colour to Pharaohs. It was used a lot in their art, tombs, rituals and costumes.

The tomb of the Pharaoh, Tutankhamun, contained all the jewellery that he wore during his life. A huge number of artefacts were retrieved from his tomb and they show the fine craftsmanship during that period in Egypt. He was buried inside a sarcophagus which fitted inside three coffins. The innermost coffin was made of solid gold while the other two were covered with gold leaves. The head was covered with a beautiful mask of pure solid gold which had been beautifully beaten and polished, and the body was decorated with over one hundred and forty pieces of jewellery.

Try making some metallic art work of your own using tin foil: Draw a design onto paper; it could be an Egyptian pattern like The Eye of Horus, another pattern, or a drawing of your own. Then place a piece of foil under your paper (resting on a soft book, polystyrene plate or soft cardboard would work best), trace over your design with a ball point pen to transfer the image onto the foil. Flip the foil over so that the raised side is the front! (You could use coloured Sharpies or biros to colour the foil too, see here.)

Alternatively, you could cut out a cardboard shape and glue it to a piece of card, cover this with a glued sheet of foil and gently rub over the shape to create a relief of your shape. This again could be coloured with biros and patterns imprinted with the pressure of the pen. See here.

To get even fancier, you could use PVA glue which when dried creates a relief to cover with foil. See here for instructions.

Activity 3:

In Pharaoh’s tombs, paintings have shown strange cones on people’s heads, see here. Supposedly these cones were made of perfumed wax, oils or fat, which people would wear on top of their wigs to parties and feasts, in the heat of the night the wax or fat would melt releasing wonderful smells and moisturising oils.

Make your own cardboard cone hat, this can either be spritzed with perfume/aftershave, or you could stuff it with cotton wool scented with essential oils, or lemon/orange zest. Party like an Egyptian and have a good old boogie to this song.

Activity 4:

The Pharaohs wore a crown that had an image of the cobra goddess, Wadjet. Only the Pharaoh was allowed to wear the cobra goddess. It was said that she would protect them by spitting flames at their enemies.

Slink, shimmy and slither like a snake, try hissing and sticking your tongue out as far as it can go. Try a Cobra stretch or ‘Snake Arm’ dance moves. You could even craft your own Cobra.

Since snakes don’t have taste buds, they don’t “taste” things like we do. But they have a sensory organ on the roof of their mouth, which is what the tip of their tongue flicks sends the “scent-taste” signals to. In a way, they can taste and smell at the same time. Try tasting sweet, salt, sour and bitter things with just the tip of your tongue; which things can the tip of your tongue taste?

To learn more about snakes you could take an online snakes quiz.

Activity 5:

Listen to ‘Song of the Pharaoh’ here and try dancing and making facial expressions like Elvis (see here).

Daily Activity 31: The ancient civilisation of Egypt

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places – Ancient Egypt

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

The river Nile provided the Ancient Egyptians with food, transportation, building materials, and more. The Ancient Egyptians called the Nile the “Aur”, which means “black” like the rich soil.

Resources list:

Poem; Yellow household items; Paper and colours; toilet roll tube, cardboard. Youtube; Bells, teatowels or pillowcases.

Activity 1:

‘The Gift Of The Nile’ is a poem is about the river Nile and how its yearly flooding was thought to be a gift or blessing to the Egyptian people from their God Aten. The floods helped the people irrigate their land and grow fertile crops. The Ancient Egyptians called the rich black soil from the floods the “Gift of the Nile”. Read, or ask somebody to read to you the poem, and come up with actions or sounds for words mentioned in it. You could also create a river soundscape with water sounds splashing, pouring and swishing.

The God Aten was a sun god who was depicted as a disk with rays reaching to the earth. At the end of the rays were human hands which often extended to the pharaoh – see here. How many yellow items you can find in your house? Recreate Aten’s disc and long reaching rays on a tabletop with your golden items. You can take a photo of your sun disc to share on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

Both ancient Egyptian men and women wore make-up. See here and here. The eye-paint was usually green (made from copper) or black (made from lead). As well as offering protection from the sun, the Egyptians believed make-up had magical healing powers, too!) Create your own Egyptian make-up look on this blank face (download and print out), or on a blank face you can draw yourself.

Activity 3:

Cats were considered to be a sacred animal by the Ancient Egyptians. It’s thought that most families kept a cat as a pet, which they believed would bring the household good luck! Egyptians did not worship cats, but believed that domestic cats carried the essence of Bastet the cat-headed goddess who represented domesticity, music, dance and pleasure. For that reason, cats were to be protected. Charms and amulets depicting cats were worn by men and women to protect the home and jewellery fashioned into cats and kittens were popular gifts.

You could make a toilet tube cat statue like this to protect your home.

Make a cat mask, (or print one from here), make some cat ears, or draw on some cat whiskers, and dress up in your favourite outfits to walk your own fashion catwalk like a fancy regal cat.

Can you make any cat sounds like these; imitate the sounds a cat makes when happy, contented, angry, frightened, hungry.

Try stretching like a cat.

Activity 4:

Listen to ‘Walk like an Egyptian’ here. Try dancing with some of the poses, stretches and moves painted by Ancient Egyptians on the ‘Tomb of the Dancers’.

In Ancient Egypt dance rhythms were also provided by hand clapping, finger snapping, tambourines, drums and body slapping. Vocalizations included songs, cries, choruses and rhythmic noises. Dancers often wore bells on their fingers and performed in flowing transparent robes and skirts. Listen to /watch the Egypt themed videos for these 2 songs here and here, can you clap your hands and click your fingers, and pat your lap, and join in with your own rhythmical noises? If you have any bells at home, you can tinkle them in time. You can make a flowing skirt by tucking teatowels or pillow cases into your waistband that swish as you move to the songs.

You could also tie a scarf around your waist and try some belly dancing moves shown here and here.

Activity 5:

Try speaking some basic Egyptian Arabic. Can you say ‘Afwan’ (you are welcome), ‘Ana Kwaies’ (I am fine), ‘Shokran’ (Thanks), ‘Ahlan’ (Welcome), ‘Ezayak?’ (How are you?), ‘Salam’ (Bye) and ‘Ma’a Salama’ (goodbye)? You can hear them being pronounced here.

Add on Activities:

The Ancient Egyptians loved playing board games, one popular game was Senet, which was played for over 2,000 years! The movement of the Senet counters was decided by throwing four two-sided sticks (in the same way we throw dice). Next time you play a board game, use sticks rather than a dice; if the sticks land with a painted side up that’s the amount of steps you could move.

Historians believe that Egyptians started using a form of toothpaste over 7,000 years ago, long before the toothbrush was invented. Having a healthy smile, white teeth, and fresh breath has been important to Egyptians for thousands of years! Have you done your teeth today?! If not, make like an Egyptian and do them pronto!

If you have the ingredients, make some Egyptian food like Egyptian Kahk Cookies see here or Baba Ghanoush see here.

Daily activity 30: Pirates of the Caribbean

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – The Life of a Pirate

Fact of the day:

The Pirates of the Caribbean film series is based on the Pirates of the Caribbean ride at Disney World. The series surrounds the adventures of the eccentric pirate, Captain Jack Sparrow.

Resources list:

Magazines/paper, straw, glue; Youtube, pan lids; water, lemon juice and sugar.

Activity 1:

Captain Jack Sparrow wears beads in his hair. You can make some paper beads of your own from old magazines to put in your hair, beard, or make a necklace with!

Activity 2:

Steel drums are a traditionally Caribbean instrument. Have a listen to them being played here. See if you can find, in your house, and objects that might make a similar noise or tone to a steel drum (pan lid, pen rattled in a cup, tin tray, empty fizzy drink can, tin of beans, frying pan, for a drum beater a spoon in a sock could work), and see if you can play along with the musician.

Try some basic calypso dance moves.

Activity 3:

Can you learn any of the Makaton signs to this reggae song?

Activity 4:

Try some pirate yoga moves?

Activity 5:

Grog was a pirate’s favourite drink, it was a mixture of rum, water, lemon juice, and sugar. Can you make an alcohol-free version to drink as you do today’s activities?

Add on Activity:

If you have the ingredients, try tasting some Caribbean food such as the fruits Guava and Mango.

Daily activity 29: Pirate Ships

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – The Life of a Pirate

Fact of the day:

A good pirate ship needed three things: it needed to be seaworthy, fast, and well-armed in order to win fights.

Resources list:

Pirate ship materials from your recycling, washing up bowl/sink/bath, kitchen foil cannon balls, 6 marbles/pebbles/grapes/bottle caps/cotton reels/cherry tomatoes/whatever you have; Paper and pens; watercolour paints, brushes, salt; Youtube.

Activity 1:

Try your hand at engineering and make your own pirate ship. It could be made from a plastic milk bottle cut lengthways; a margarine tub, an egg box; a juice carton; a plastic bottle; a dish sponge; styrofoam packaging, a plastic vegetable tray, or anything else you can find that looks suitable. It doesn’t have to be really fancy looking, you can keep it very simple.

Now you’ve made your pirate ship, let’s see how seaworthy it is, and let’s test it for buoyancy… place your boat on water in the sink/a washing up bowl/the bath. Does it float? Does it sink? Does it tip over? How does it cope if there’s a slight ripple in the water? Would it made a good seaworthy ship for a gang of pirates to use? What would happen if your pirate ship was attacked by cannonballs – would it stay afloat? Try throwing tinfoil balls at your ship, when you make a strike does your ship cope well?

When pirates got a new ship, (usually by stealing one) they usually made some changes; they would mount as many cannons on the new ship as they could without significantly slowing her down or making her sink. Six cannons was the minimum that pirates liked to have on board. Let’s see how heavy we can make your ship before it sinks. Can you place six ‘cannons’ (such as 6 marbles/6 pebbles/6 grapes/6 bottle caps/6 cotton reels/6 cherry tomatoes/6 whatever you have!) on board your pirate ship and still stay afloat? Send us photos of your ships with their heavy loads, you can share them on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

The skull and crossbones flag at the top of a pirate ship is called a Jolly Roger. This flag was not the only flag used by pirates but was the most effective in scaring people into surrender without a battle. Many pirates also simply used a black flag. Some other pirate flags can be seen here.

Draw your own fearsome pirate flag – what seafaring design will yours have?

Activity 3:

Aboard their ships and galleons, pirates would use nautical terms for navigation and direction. Learn what these directions mean and point in the direction of each: Starboard (right), Port (left), Stern (back), Bow (front). Read, or have somebody read to you this series of navigation commands; how quickly can you point in the directions?

Activity 4:

There would be lots of salty seaspray aboard a pirate ship. Try watercolour painting using salt and see what effects you can create, like this.

Activity 5:

Listen to these pirate sea shanties and practice your rowing action, reaching forwards and backwards in time with the beat of the songs.

You could even try some ‘party’ rowing dance moves to Upside Your Head!

Activity 6:

A common pirate fact for all sailors: whistling on a ship is thought to bring bad fortune, especially if you whistle into the wind. Since we’re on dry ground, practice your whistling in time to this sea shanty.

Add on Activity:

Try this online pirate flag generator here (it uses quite out-of-date graphics, but is still fun!)

Daily activity 28: Treasure Island

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – The Life of a Pirate

Fact of the day:

Robert Louis Stevenson wrote Treasure Island in 1881. It is set in the days of sailing ships and pirates and tells of the adventures of Jim Hawkins and his search for the buried treasure of an evil pirate.

Resources list:

Paper, card, pens, glue, toilet roll tube, feathers, string, stick, youtube; Brown paper, teabag, pens; Coins, paper, coloured pencils; White wax crayon, water colour paint; Printer; Bottles, a ball.

Activity 1:

Captain Flint is the name of the parrot in the book. The parrot belongs to Long John Silver and it has travelled all around the world with the pirates. In the book, the parrot is perched on the shoulder of Long John Silver and serves as a means of alerting Jim Hawkins and his friends to the presence of Long John Silver, as Captain Flint constantly squawks, “Pieces of eight!” and other pirate phrases!

Make a parrot companion of your own, like this. Or make a Twirling Parrot by doing this. Or make this parrot bookmark using this template and these instructions. Or download and print a parrot to colour in that can be cut out to perch on your shoulder.

Practice saying ‘Pieces of Eight’ in your best parrot voice! Check out this clever talking parrot!

Activity 2:

Jim Hawkins finds a map in Billy Bones’s sea chest, Jim takes the map to Squire Trelawney and Doctor Livesey who realise that it shows where Captain Flint, an evil and heartless pirate, has buried his stolen treasure.

Make a treasure map of your own, depicting a treasure island filled with paths, landmarks, trees,  plants, buildings, mountains or hills, rivers and lakes, sea serpents, some ships, a castle, skull and crossbones and anything else you fancy. You could get fancy and add a compass in the corner. Don’t forget to add an ‘x’ that marks the spot of the treasure. You could use any paper, but brown parchment (or a brown paper grocery bag) looks particularly authentic. You could also scrunch the paper up and rip along the edges to make it look aged; using a tea-bag to stain the map can also add an aged effect.

Your map can look however you want, but there are some ideas for inspiration here, here, here, and here.

You could roll the map into a scroll and tie it with a piece of string for somebody to hide in your house or garden for you to discover!

Activity 3:

Try out some map-reading co-ordinates with this online game. To read co-ordinates you read across, then up. So, (3,2) would be 3 steps across, 2 steps up.

Activity 4:

To make some treasure for a chest (you could make a chest from an egg box, perhaps), using a pencil or coloured pencils, try out some coin rubbings. Once you’ve rubbed a page full of different coins, try matching them with the real coins, like this.

Also, you could cut them out and match up all of the same coins and place them in piles in a treasure chest.

If you’re looking for hidden treasure, you could do your coin rubbings with a white wax crayon and create ‘secret’ money that you could ‘reveal’ by brushing water colors over the rubbings.

A doubloon was a Spanish gold coin often found in pirate’s treasure chest. It was called this as it was a ‘double’, and worth the amount of two. Download and print this Coin Matching Game to find two of everything by matching the doubles, and work on improving your memory of what’s in your pirate’s booty!

Activity 5:

Entertain yourself on your desert island by playing a game of coconut bowling (you can use a normal ball if you don’t have a coconut to hand!!)

Daily activity 27: Famous Pirates

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – The Life of a Pirate

Fact of the day:

Blackbeard’s real name was Edward Teach and he lived from 1680 – 1718. He was  one of the most feared pirates from what has become known as ‘The Golden Age of Pirates’.

Resources list:

Paper or card, wood/curled paper/paint; paper and pens; scarf/bandana, ball/tin foil balls; storm sounds (see activity 4).

Activity 1:

Blackbeard’s beard was legendary. Legend has it that before capturing a ship he would weave hemp into his beard and light it on fire, an intimidation tactic that made him look scary. Yikes!

Make yourself a beard or a twiddly moustache! Cut out your own beard shape on paper (or download and print to use this template) and on to it you can either glue wool, colour in the hair, paint hair strokes, or curl paper (like this ) to stick onto it.

Activity 2:

Due to the crimes Blackbeard committed, the authorities wanted to capture him and bring him to justice. ‘Wanted’ posters could be found across the Caribbean and the eastern coast of North America. Make a pirate wanted poster of your own. Which pirate are you wanting to find? What do they look like? What were their crimes? Where were they last seen? What reward are you offering for their capture? Share your posters with us on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

Make yourself an eye patch to cover one eye (or use a scarf/bandana to cover one eye). Apparently one of the reasons pirates wore eye patches was to help keep one eye adjusted to night vision for seeing below deck. With one eye covered, see if you can hit some targets above deck! Place some baskets, boxes, plastic tubs, or bins in a line. Standing in one spot can you throw a ball (or tin foil balls) into each of them with your one eye closed? If you can do this, start moving the targets further and further away, or further to the sides to make it trickier! Do you think it was easy for pirates to do things accurately when wearing an eye patch?

Activity 4:

There were women pirates, too. Being a pirate wasn’t just for men. Famous female pirates include Mary Read, Anne Bonny, Grace O’Malley, and Ching Shih. The American pirate, Rachel Wall tricked other sailors to steal from them; whenever a storm passed through the region, she would dress her boat up to look like it had been ravaged by rough seas. Rachel would then stand on the deck and plead for aid from passing ships. When the unsuspecting rescuers came near, they were promptly boarded and robbed.

Try re-enacting a storm of your own; use liquid in a bottle to make the swishing noise of the waves, howl like the wind, put some rice in a Tupperware box and rattle it so sound like the rain dashing onto the boat, try wobbling cardboard to sound like thunder, crashing some pans together, and flicking a torch on and off for lightning.

Add on Activity:

Legend has it that the first English-language recipe for what could be considered “guacamole” was recorded by in 1679 by William Dampier, a pirate. William wrote down the first recorded recipes of guacamole and mango chutney! If you have the ingredients, try tasting, or making guacamole.

Daily activity 26: Become a Pirate

This week’s theme:

Unsolved Mysteries – The Life of a Pirate

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

The English word “pirate” comes from the Latin term “pirata” which means ‘sea robber’ and from the Greek word “peirates” which means ‘one who attacks ships’.

Resources list:

Youtube; Paper and drawing materials; pirate dictionary download; pirate rhyme download; newspaper, tea towel, colouring pens.

Activity 1:

If you were a pirate, what would your pirate name be? See here for some inspiration. Draw yourself as your swashbuckling alias! Take a photos and share your art work with us! You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

Try some pirate role play and act out these pirate actions. Put all the actions together into a dance routine that can be done to this song.

Activity 3:

Mateys, to talk like a pirate, read (or ask somebody to read) this pirate lingo! Try saying the words out loud, and either come up with some actions to go with each word, or act some of them out!

Activity 4:

Come up with some actions for this pirate rhyme.

For this next rhyme can you come up with a dance that involves climbing aboard a ship, pointing ‘this way’ and ‘that way’, moving forwards and backwards, and taking a big step ‘over’? … “I climbed aboard a pirate ship and the captain said to me. I’m going this way that way, forwards and backwards, over the Irish Sea. A bottle of rum to fill my tum, now that’s the life for me.”

Activity 5:

Sing like a pirate to some buccaneering songs!  Sing or shout out ‘Yo Ho’ to this song, ‘Yo Ho Ho & A Bottle of Rum’ to this song, ‘Alley-Alley-O’ to this song, and ‘Way Hey’ to this song! You could do some body percussion to them too.

Activity 6:

Dress like a pirate! Make an origami newspaper hat; tie a tea towel for a neck bandana; and colour in a mask to wear!

Daily Activity 25: The BFG

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Roald Dahl

Fact of the day:

The Big Friendly Giant is unlike other giants. He doesn’t like to eat people, and he captures dreams and keeps them in jars for people to enjoy while they were asleep.

Resources list:

Colouring pens and decorative bits and pieces; empty jar and either tissue paper and glue, cotton wool and paint or food colouring and glitter; Youtube; paper pieces and a hat/bag/bowl to catch in; paper and pens, pencils, crayons or paints.

Activity 1:

The BFG speaks in quite a turned-around way, but we always understand him. His language is called gobblefunk. He tells Sophie: “Words…is oh such a twitch-tickling problem to me all my life. So you must simply try to be patient and stop squibbling. As I am telling you before, I know exactly what words I am wanting to say, but somehow or other they is always getting squiff-squiddled around.”

Try writing and saying some words, such as your name, backwards (‘James’ would be ‘Semaj’, ‘Lorna’ would be ‘Anrol’, ‘Bronia would be ‘Ainorb’, Lisa would be ‘Asil’).

Then try saying these tongue twisters and see how squiff-squiddled you get!

‘I wish to wash my Irish wristwatch’

‘She sells sea shells by the sea shore’

‘Unique New York, New York unique, unique New York, New York unique’.

Activity 2:

The BFG keeps dreams in jars (he has a huge collection on shelves in his cave) and uses his trumpet to blow them into bedrooms and into the heads of people who are sleeping at night. The BFG takes a deep breath and whoof, he blows the dreams through the trumpet. ‘I is a dream-blowing giant,’ the BFG said. ‘When all the other giants is galloping off every what way and which to swollop human beans, I is scuddling away to other places to blow dreams into the bedrooms of sleeping children. Nice dreams. Lovely golden dreams. Dreams that is giving the dreamers a happy time.’

Create your own dream jars! You can either download and colour this dream jar print-out or decorate it with glued shiny dream bits and bobs. Or, if you have an empty jar, create a dream jar like this one using tissue paper, this one using cotton wool, or this one using water & glitter.

As you decorate your jar think about what dreams you would like to come true. The BFG names nice dreams names like “WinkSquibblers” and Golden Fizzwiggs” and he locks away any unwanted “TroggleHumpers” or Nightmares. What name would you give the dream you want to come true?

Activity 3:

Imagine you’re a giant. Practice walking like a giant, making big steps as you try to avoid standing on the rooftops and trees below you. Make sure you don’t squash any people under your feet, tread carefully on your tip toes! Make giant strides to cross over rivers in one step. Peer out to see for miles as you’re so high up.

Listen to this giant song as you make your giant steps around your house.

Activity 4:

The BFG uses his huge ears to locate the invisible dreams and then catches them with a net at the end of a long pole. Try a dream-catching game; cut out some ‘dream’ shapes from different materials (paper, cardboard, tin foil, tissue paper) and throw them into the air like confetti. With a hat, pan, bowl or bag (unless you have a net) try catching as many dreams as you can in 30 seconds. Keep practicing until you become a master dreamcatcher.

Activity 5:

The BFG catches his dreams in Dream Country which is found on top of a mountain, hidden by fog. In Dream Country there is a mighty ‘Dream Tree’, which sits under a bright starry sky in the middle of a grassy marsh. Dream Country is accessed by jumping through a reflective pool of water at the tree’s base. The sky is full of lightning bolts creating dreams when they strike one of the Dream Tree’s leaves.

What do you imagine the dream tree looks like from this description? Draw or paint it and share a photo of it with us! You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Add-on Activity:

If you have the ingredients, you could make your own Frobscottle drink!

Daily Activity 24: The Twits

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Roald Dahl

Fact of the day:

Roald Dahl’s book ‘The Twits’ was first published in 1980. It tells the tale of a pair of horrible twits and the tricks they like to play on each other.

Resources list:

Paper, card, beard decorations; Tea towel, wooden spoon, fork, spoon; Youtube.

Activity 1:

The first sentence of the story is, “What a lot of hairy-faced men there are around nowadays!” this is referring to Mr Twit, who is a hairy-faced man, with a large wild beard and hair growing out of his nose and ears. Mr. Twit has a beard because he believes it makes him wise and grand, but he is actually only a twit who has not washed his beard in years. Mr Twit’s uncleaned beard is very dirty and it collects bits of sardines and cornflakes, and mould.  Because of this, Mr. Twit is never hungry; “By sticking out his tongue and curling it sideways to explore the hairy jungle around his mouth, he was always able to find a tasty morsel here and there to nibble on.”

Make yourself a Mr Twit beard to wear! You could make beard hair from curled paper, wool, tissue paper, or by colouring-in. What food will be hidden in your beard that you’ve saved to eat later? Some beard ideas can be found  here, here, here, or here. If you make a beard, send us a photo of you wearing it! You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

The Twits are always playing tricks on each other. For example, Mr. Twit puts a frog in Mrs. Twit’s bed, and convinces her she is shrinking by adding height to her walking stick, while Mrs. Twit serves Mr. Twit spaghetti full of worms, only telling him about the worms afterwards.

Try and play some tricks on people you live with… Learn how to make a Tea Towel appear to be haunted! And trick somebody to think that cutlery is dancing!

Activity 3:

Muggle-wump is a character in The Twits, he is a monkey and he and his family have been imprisoned by the horrible Mr and Mrs Twit and forced to stand on their heads all day as part of Mr Twit’s ‘Great Upside Down Monkey Circus’ training.

Can you move like a monkey? If you can get to the floor, try some of these moves or, monkey around your house dancing with money arms, and swinging your monkey tail to this song!

Muggle-wump is from Africa; listen to some of these sounds made by an African instrument, the Djembe drum and try and beat along, perhaps patting your palms on your thighs, a table, or a bucket, or a tub, or by tapping a pen on a table, or clapping or stomping your feet. You could then try some body percussion to try out some beats of your own here. You could even try out an African dance lesson!

Activity 4:

Each week, Mr. Twit covers the Big Dead tree with Hughtight Sticky Glue to capture birds for Bird Pie. The birds are always warned by Muggle-Wump and his African monkey family not to land on the tree, but the birds do not speak African and cannot understand them. One day, a Roly-Poly Bird from Africa vacationing in England meets the monkeys in their cage. They warn Roly-Poly about the tree, and Roly-Poly communicates this to the local birds, keeping them safe.

There are an estimated 1500-2000 African languages but Swahili is the most spoken language in Africa, with over 100 million speakers. Maybe the Roly-Poly bird spoke Swahili. Practice saying the following words in Swahili: ‘Sasa’ (Hi), ‘Jambo’ (Hello), ‘Kwa Heri’ (Goodbye), ‘Tutaonana’ (See You Later), ‘Ahsante’ (Thank You), ‘Tafadhali’ (Please), ‘Sawa’ (OK). You can hear them being pronounced here.

Daily Activity 23: James and the Giant Peach

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Roald Dahl

Fact of the day:

In this book, James drops some magical crocodile tongues near a peach tree. This makes a peach grow to be as big as a house! James goes inside the peach and meets insects that are his size. James and the group travel in the peach across the ocean and in the sky from England to New York City.

Resources list:

A ‘ramp’, different household objects, stopclock; card, scissors, penny, string; rainbow coloured objects; paint and paper; mirror, CD, torch; pens and paper; Youtube.

Activity 1:

In the story the peach rolls down the hill and breaks through fences. It goes right through fields of animals. It rolls through a chocolate factory and out the other side! Suddenly, chocolate is oozing down the streets and children are running and dancing and swimming in it! Think of a giant bowling ball knocking over pins. That was the giant peach, knocking over everything in its path. Suddenly, the peach rolls straight off a cliff and falls down, down, down right into the enormous ocean. Surprisingly, it begins floating along, as peaceful as can be.

Try rolling different sized objects down a ramp (this could be a sofa cushion placed at a slant, or an ironing board resting on the arm of a chair, or a sloping plastic box lid, etc). Do smaller objects roll slower or faster than larger objects? If the slope is steeper, do things roll faster than if the slope is shallow? Experiment with different shaped and sized objects, do round objects work best or worst? What’s the best rolling object you’ve found? Let us know! You could use a stopclock to time your rolls. You could listen to this song while you roll.

Activity 2:

The Silkworm is one of the creatures James meets aboard the Giant Peach. Although she says little, she is an invaluable member of the Peach’s crew: without her quickly-spun silk, James’s plan to rescue the Peach from the threatening sharks might never have worked. He ties one end of her spun silk to the peach and the other to 502 flying seagulls and the peach is carried away from the sharks like this.

Try making a spinning top to create a silk-spinning action. Or make a spinner like this using this template or this  colour template glued to card.

Activity 3:

When the peach was in the sky James and his friends notice creatures in the clouds. These creatures were much taller than a grown-up, ‘wispy . . . shadowy’, and looked like they were made of cotton candy and white hair. These were the Cloud-Men who are always busy with many different jobs. James sees hundreds of Cloud-Men painting a half-circle with big cans of paints and brushes. They work fast and before long the arch is full of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple paint, making a beautiful rainbow. Once Cloud-Men finish the rainbow, they lower it down from the clouds slowly on ropes.

Find objects in your house that match the colours of the rainbow: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo (dark blue), violet (purple) and lay them out on a table to make your own rainbow.

Paint a rainbow, like the Cloud-Men. Put it up in your window to bring some cheer to your neighbours. Take a photo of you next to your rainbow and share it with us! You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Try a science experiment to make a rainbow with light diffraction like this or this.

Activity 4:

In the book James, is sent to live with his mean aunts who aren’t very nice to him and don’t allow him to have friends. He is sad and lonely and would love to find a way to escape; James then goes on his journey in the peach and finds happiness and friendship. The ladybird character in the book is very kind to James, she is excited for the journey on the Peach to begin, she believes they will see ‘marvellous places’ and ‘wonderful things’. The ladybird is very optimistic (she believes good things will happen). What are you optimistic about? What are you looking forward to?

Make a colourful sign with an optimistic message for your Purple Patch friends. If you share it with us (without specific friends names mentioned on it, but you could mention which group your friends go to) we can put it online for everybody to see. You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

You could listen to a song from the film soundtrack while you make your sign.

Activity 5:

In the end, James and his insect friends make it to New York and the Peach lands on the spike of the Empire State Building! The enormous peach stone ends up being set up permanently in place of honour in Central Park and becomes a famous monument.

Have a boogie to some New York inspired songs such as this, this, or this. Come up with some of your own moves – can you reach your arms up as tall as the Empire State Building, stretch as wide as Central Park, pose like the Statue of Liberty?

Add-on Activity:

If you have the ingredients, you could try eating peaches, or making a recipe from James and The Giant Peach: Crispy Wasp Stings On A Piece Of Buttered Toast.

If you have a garden, you could look under rocks or in dark spots to see if you can spot any of the (normal sized!) insects that James shared his journey with: Spider, Ladybug, Earthworm, or Centipede.

Daily Activity 22: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Roald Dahl

Fact of the day:

In this book, 5 children find golden tickets and win a tour through the most magnificent chocolate factory in the world, led by the world’s most unusual candy maker, Willy Wonka.

Resources list:

Downloaded passage from the book; Paper and pens; Coloured card or paper (or coloured-in card), scissors, glue, stick or straw; Youtube.

Activity 1:

Willy Wonka invented lots of wonderful sweets, from Everlasting Gobstoppers to Lickable Wallpaper; Fizzy Lifting Drinks to Square Sweets that Look Round; Chocolate Rivers to Wonka’s Whipple-Scrumptious Fudgemallow Delight; The Chewing Gum Meal to Hair Toffee (“You eat just one tiny bit of that, and in exactly half an hour a brand-new luscious thick silky beautiful crop of hair will start growing all over the top of your head! And a moustache! And a beard!”). Read, or ask somebody to ready to you, about some other Wonka sweets in this passage from the book.

Think of your own wonderful sweet; what is it called, what is it made of, what colour is it? Does it make the eater do anything? Design your own chocolate wrapper for this wonderful bar of your own invention!

Make a paper lollypop, for instructions see here. What wild and wonderful flavour does your lolly taste like?

Activity 2:

Listen to ‘The Candy Man’ and come up with your own actions for the lyrics written in purple.

Activity 3:

In the 2005 version of the film, the Oompa Loompas have some very catchy songs, like this one about Augustus Gloop! Learn some of the dance moves to the song here!

Activity 4:

How many of the signs can you remember from when ‘Pure Imagination’ was our cool-down song? Have a listen to the song here – how many of the signs can you do? Watch Bronia’s Cool Down video to double check you got it all right!

Activity 5:

When the Oompa Loompas meet the character Mike Teavee they say this rhyme about watching too much TV, “In almost every house we’ve been, We’ve watched them gaping at the screen. They loll and slop and lounge about, And stare until their eyes pop out.” If you’ve had lots of screen-time recently, try some Eye Yoga.

Add-on Activity:

A portion of the book is read with BSL signs for you to watch here.

Daily Activity 21: Roald Dahl

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Roald Dahl

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here. This week Lorna has drawn a Giant Peach with room to add yourself to the picture. Can you spot these insects: earthworm, grasshopper, centipede, silk worm, glow worm, spider and ladybird?

Fact of the day:

Roald Dahl was a spy, an ace fighter pilot, a chocolate historian and a medical inventor. As a writer his extraordinary mission is to amaze, thrill and inspire.

Resources list:

Bits and bobs and recycling; paper/card, sticks/straws, selotape, Youtube; Paper, pens; mirror.

Activity 1:

Roald Dahl was an inventor as well as a writer, and he also wrote the screenplay for Chitty Bang Bang that featured the inventor ‘Caractacus Pott’.

Watch this animation about the inventor of ‘The Shirt Machine’; at about 1:07 minutes you can see all the bits and pieces that go into making an inventing machine. Using objects and bits collected from around your house and from your recycling, can you stick together a weird and wonderful inventing machine of your own? What will the machine create? Hot ice-cream for cold days? Never-ending coffee?

When the machine is working, what noises and actions does it make? Try clicking your tongue and swirling your hands to start it up, then chug and clap while it’s working, for example. What noise does the machine make if you raise your arms into the air or sit on the floor; what action does the machine make if you whisper or whistle?

Have a sing-&-dance-along to Chitty Chitty Bang Bang!

Activity 2:

Roald Dahl once worked as a spy, and also write the screenplay for the James Bond film ‘You Only Live Twice’. From cardboard or paper, try creating a disguise such as eyebrows and a moustache to create your secret identity (or you could print some out to stick onto sticks here, or here). Wearing your disguise can you quietly and stealthily walk through your house, ducking behind sofas and doorways to avoid being detected? Try doing it to a Bond theme song.

Activity 3:

Roald Dahl wrote about some wild and crazy characters with wonderful names. Check here to find out what your Roald Dahl name would be, using your initials. What does your new character look like? How do they behave? What are their habits? What would they wear? What would they say? How would they act? Draw, or create a simple hand puppet, stick puppet, finger puppet, or tube puppet of your character and share a photo of it with us! You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

You could even write a story about your character that you could act out using props!

Activity 4:

Dahl was famous for his inventive, playful use of language in his writing. He would invent new words by scribbling down words before swapping letters around. He didn’t always explain what his words meant, but people can work them out because they often sound like a word we know. For example, you know that something lickswishy and delumptious is good to eat, whereas something uckyslush, disgusterous or rotsome is most definitely not! Try saying all of these words out loud and come up with an action for each one.

Can you find any objects in your house that make the sounds of, or feels like something squishous, or something that squizzles, fizzlecrumps or fizzwiggles?

Try coming up with some of your own imaginary words and definitions; you could even put them into a song or come up with rhyming words!

Add-on Activity:

Roald Dahl once said, “If you have good thoughts they will shine out of your face like sunbeams and you will always look lovely.” What good things could you do today for yourself and for the people you live with? Try and spread some goodness by being helpful, saying kind words and showing people that you care. How do other people’s smiling faces make you feel? Look in the mirror and compliment yourself on something you see in yourself, do sunbeams start to shine from your face?

Daily Activity 20: Hives

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Animal Habitats

Fact of the day:

A honeybee hive can contain up to 50,000 bees.

Resources list:

Youtube; straight everyday household objects in sets of 6; sugar and water, paper or card, scissors; A4 paper, stapler or glue.

Activity 1:

Bees return to their hives to communicate to the other bees in their colony about the location of new food sources. Watch this video to see the Waggle Dance that the bees use to communicate this information. Try creating your own waggle dance by shaking your bum in the direction of your food source – this may be your kitchen!. If your food is far away you’ll have to waggle for longer, but if you’re nearer the kitchen you’ll waggle less.

Activity 2:

Within the hive is one queen bee, thousands of female worker bees and hundreds of male drone bees. A honeybee hive is like a busy city always full of activity and work. Listen to ‘Flight of the Bumblebees’. How does the music make you feel? From the music do you think bees go about their work slowly, or quickly? Are the bees busy or lazy? Does it sound like one bee, or a swarm of bees?

Activity 3:

Within the hive, bees make honeycomb which is formed from hundreds of hexagons packed neatly together like this. Perfectly packed hexagons hold the most amount of honey using the smallest amount of building materials (wax) and the least amount of effort from the bees. Honeycomb cells store honey and are also used to store nectar, pollen, and water, as well as a nursery for larvae. Hexagons are a 6 sided shape; find 6 objects of the same size (6 teaspoons, 6 felt tips, 6 book spines, 6 lollypop sticks, 6 cotton buds, 6 toothpicks, 6 socks, etc) and make some different sized hexagons. What’s the largest hexagon you can make, what’s the smallest?

Activity 4:

Bees make honey (which is their food) by visiting flowers and collecting nectar from the blossom, they suck it out with their tongues. When they have a full load, they fly back to the hive. The nectar is passed from bee to bee, each bee chewing the nectar until it gradually turns into honey. Then the bees store it in honeycomb cells. The honey is still a bit wet, so the bees fan it with their wings to make it dry out and become more sticky. When it’s ready, they seal the cell with a wax lid to keep it clean. You can see the process here.

Try lapping up nectar (made from sugar dissolved in water) using only your tongue. You could make a flower for your nectar to go in the center of like this, or this.

Have a honey taste-test if you have some at home. Do you like the taste? Make 2 paper fans to fan or waft your honey with first!

Add-on Activity:

If you have any toilet roll tubes left, you could make a honeycomb game, scoring different points (secretly written inside the tops of the tubes) whenever your tinfoil ‘bee’ ball enters the tube.

Daily Activity 19: Woodland Floors

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Animal Habitats

Fact of the day:

The woodland floor has habitats hidden underground. Badgers are in their setts, rabbits in their holes, and foxes in their dens.

Resources list:

A messy bed!; badger poem; Youtube; tubes, cardboard boxes, sellotape, tinfoil ball, yoghurt pots.

Activity 1:

Badgers live in a network of underground burrows and tunnels know as a sett. Each badger territory will include a main sett and several smaller outlying setts. Setts tend to be located in the shelter of woodland, with the badgers emerging at night to forage in fields and meadows. Badgers clean out their sleeping areas, dragging out old hay, bracken, grass and anything they’ve used as bedding by carrying it under their chin. This prevents a build-up of fleas and lice. Can you clean out your sleeping space by making your bed today using only your chin? Give it a go!

Activity 2:

Explore this badger poem and add actions and movements for certain words.

Try acting the poem out, can you lay like a docile badger; shimmer and shimmy like the moonlight; snuffle like a badger’s snout; waddle with your tummy close to the ground; watch and be aware of dangers, and other things mentioned in the poem?

Activity 3:

Learn the Makaton signs for Woodland animals, see here.

Activity 4:

A Fox makes its home by digging an underground burrow called a ‘Den’ or an ‘Earth’. These Dens are dug-out tunnels that have rooms for the fox and its family to live in, they provide a cool area to sleep, a good location to store food and a safe place to have their pups. With toilet and kitchen roll tubes and cardboard boxes you could make your own tunnel system for a paper or foil ‘fox’ ball to travel down to its bed. See here  for an example. You could time how long it takes to reach each bed, do more joined tubes make it a longer journey to bed?

Activity 5:

A fox’s Den has several exits so that they can flee if a predator enters the burrow. Try finding the exit in a maze game (to play online, or to download & print off) here.

Activity 6:

Try tip-toeing and slinking slyly like a lithe fox, swishing your brush-like tail, or burrowing with your paws in time to a song from Fantastic Mr Fox.

Daily Activity 18: Treetops

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Animal Habitats

Fact of the day:

Some animals make their homes in trees. Wasps and birds live up high in nests, and squirrels live up high in dreys.

Resources list:

Paper strips; cardboard, string or wool, leaves and twigs; paper bag, printed squirrel image; blankets and cushions; brown paper, scissors, Sellotape.

Activity 1:

Squirrels live in holes in trees – they weave strips of bark, twigs and leaves into tight bundles to make a nest called a drey, and line it with moss and grass. Try some paper weaving or some nature weaving.  Or, make a paper bag drey for your own squirrel (you could download and print a squirrel here). If you make a drey you can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 2:

To make the drey, squirrels carry material to the site with their mouth and front paws; they bend stiffer twigs with their head and face; push other material into place with their legs; shred lining materials by holding them with their front paws and chewing; and shape the inner cavity by lying in it and turning around. Act like a squirrel to build a pillow drey – carry blankets, cushions, pillows, quilts and other soft things using your mouth and paws; move and bend it all into position onto a sofa using your head and cheeks, and shape it into a comfortable habitat by lying and rolling in it. Fingers crossed there’s no moss, twigs, bark or grass in your drey!

Activity 3:

Squirrels curl up tight in their dreys when they’re sleeping, like this. Try curling up tight – curl your chin down to touch your chest; curl your chin to touch your knees; screw your eyes up small; curl your fingers one by one to make a fist with both hands; curl your back to touch your toes with your finger tips; curl your toes; lift your right hand up into the air and curl it over your head to touch your left ear; do the same with your left hand to touch your right ear. Can you curl up into a ball?

Activity 4:

Wasp nests are very beautiful, see here. The Queen wasp chews up wood to make paper and then makes that into the beautiful layered nest. You could layer some paper and create a wasp nest inspired bowl, such as the brown paper ones here.

Add-on Activity:

Try an online squirrel jigsaw.

Daily Activity 17: Riverbanks

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Animal Habitats

Fact of the day:

The riverbank is home to birds, mammals and insects including Kingfishers, Frogs, Newts, Voles, Shrews, Dragonfly, Otters, Herons, Toads and Beavers.

Resources list:

Tin foil, sheet /large towel, mittens; green (or coloured-in green) paper, plates or bun cases, or paper; you tube; boxes, tubes, construction materials.

Activity 1:

Otters live in homes on the riverbank called ‘holts’. Otters eat a lot and spend up to five hours a day finding food (that’s almost the whole of a Purple Patch day!) Otters love eating fish and they also love playing, so why not try a fishing game… Make some 3D scrunched up tin toil fish and then get a sheet or large towel for somebody to ‘bounce’ the fish on for you. Wearing mittens (to pretend that you have otter paws), try and catch as many fish as you can in 30 seconds when they come close to you on the sheet!

Activity 2:

Frogs need a habitat with lots of insects buzzing about, and areas for them to get out of the water easily, such as onto lily pads. Try playing a game using your own jumping frog (see here for how to make your own paper frog). Jump your frog from a starting line into the air to catch some ‘flies’, then using plates, bun cases, or green paper cut outs as lily pads count up how many lily pad targets your jumping frog lands onto after 10 goes (see here.)

Activity 3:

Can you ribbit just like this frog? Hop around your room (or bend your knees and arms) making your own croaks and ribbits in time with the Frog Chorus.

Activity 4:

Beavers make their own homes called ‘lodges’, many can be found in Scotland. Beavers are excellent construction workers and gnaw, carry, and assemble their wooden homes from scratch; see them in this film. A lodge can be 3 meters high – using recycled items such as toilet roll tubes or cardboard boxes or anything else you have in your house, see how tall you can construct your own building. You can share photos of your lodges on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Add-on Activity:

If you have a garden, make a frog hidey-hole!

Daily Activity 16: Hedgerows

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Animal Habitats

This week’s colouring in sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here.

Fact of the day:

There are over 500,000 kilometres of hedgerow in Britain. That is a very large habitat for butterflies, mice and birds, spiders, and hedgehogs.

Resources list:

Paper/card, drawing pens/pencils, high-vis vest; green, brown and colourful household items; youtube; bug hotel materials; Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland story download, paper, pens.

Activity 1:

Hedgerows can also be thought of as ‘wildlife roads’ along which animals and birds can travel safely between other habitats. On paper or card, make some of your own road signs like this, this, or this for the butterflies, mice, birds, spiders and hedgehogs that live in hedgerows. If you can find a high-vis jacket you could even dress as a Lollypop man/woman and invite some of the creatures to cross your wildlife road!

Activity 2:

Thick, flora-rich hedges provide valuable nesting and foraging opportunities for a huge range of wildlife. Have a forage around your house or garden for items that are green and brown like a hedge or have pops of colour like berries and flowers. Use these materials to create a hedgerow ‘art attack’ on a table or on the floor. Draw some animals to nest in your hedge, peeping out from the foliage (or download, print and colour ones from here, here, and  here.

Activity 3:

Hedgehogs communicate through a combination of snuffles, grunts and squeals; try making some snuffling noises of your own! Hedgehogs have weak eyesight but a strong sense of hearing and smell; test your sense of hearing by trying this sounds quiz!

Activity 4:

Hedgerow habitats are under threat as many hedges are being destroyed. To create alternative habitats for some of the bugs that would have lived in hedges, you could try making a simple bug hotel using things in your recycling like  this hotel, this bug hotel, this hotel, this one, or this one.

Activity 5:

Dormice make their nests in hedgerows. A dormouse is one of the characters at the Mad Hatters Tea Party in ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’. Download and read part of the story here and create some drawings/paintings, or make or list of things, or forage around your house for objects that start with the letter ‘M’.

Add-on Activity:

You could make a simple hedgehog house or make your own binoculars to imagine viewing nature up close.

Daily Activity 15: Spring Traditions

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Spring & Easter

Fact of the day:

Across the world spring is seen as a time for new beginnings, happiness and growth. Many countries have their own unique spring traditions and celebrations.

Resources list:

Youtube, socks; ball, bowl, tape/wool/string; paper/card and colouring materials

Activity 1:

An egg dance is a traditional Easter game in which eggs are laid on the ground and the goal is to dance among them damaging as few as possible. Try this game, but instead of eggs, try dancing to this song whilst not stepping on paired-up sock balls scattered on the floor.

Activity 2:

Another form of egg dancing was a 16th and 17th century springtime game depicted in the painting ‘The Egg Dance’ by Pieter Aertsen (see it here.) The goal was to roll an egg out of a bowl while keeping within a circle drawn by chalk and then flip the bowl to cover the egg. This had to be done with the feet and without touching the other objects placed on the floor.

Try your own version of this game using a ball, (or ball of foil, ball of paper) rather than an egg. Mark out a circular area on the floor to stay within using tape or wool or ribbon rather than chalk. You can use your feet, or your hands to tip up a plastic bowl to try and cover the ball whilst staying inside the circle!

Activity 3:

Cimburijada, which translates to “Festival of Scrambled Eggs,” celebrates the first day of spring in the Bosnian town of Zenica. At the crack of dawn, people gather by the banks of the Bosna river, where a communal meal of scrambled eggs is prepared. Try eating scrambled eggs for lunch!

Decorate some paper or cardboard egg shapes (or download and print out some pre-drawn eggs for colouring in here), cut your eggs out and then cut the egg shapes into large solid pieces. ‘Scramble’ the pieces up to create a jigsaw for you to solve! The more eggs you work on at once, the trickier it will be to solve the puzzle!

Activity 4:

In Mexico, people gather at the enormous Teotihuacán Pyramid to celebrate the spring equinox. People use the morning to climb the 360 steps to the top of the Pyramid. By raising their arms towards the sky and basking in the sun’s warmth, they “soak up” energy for the year. Try counting your steps as you walk around this morning, can you get anything close to 360 footsteps? Try move No.1 of the Sun Salutation yoga poses here or try the seated Sun Salutations here; you could do the stretches to this relaxing Mexican music.

Daily Activity 14: Spring Blossom

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Spring & Easter

Fact of the day:

Hanami is the Japanese tradition of celebrating blossom as the first sign of Spring.

Resources list:

Youtube; blanket, picnic, strawberries/orange/kiwi; paper, scissors, stapler or glue; plastic bottle, paint, paper.

Activity 1:

In Japan as the trees become alive with the color of cherry blossom (which they call ‘Sakura’) the local people all head to their closest park with food and drinks such as tea, they find a perfect spot for sitting down and enjoy a long picnic under the blossom trees. This is called ‘hanami’. Strawberries are the seasonal spring fruit in Japan, making them a popular hanami dessert. Other fruits like oranges and kiwi fruit are also popular in Japan. Once the sun goes down everybody is in for a cherry blossom viewing treat as Sakura are often illuminated with hanging lanterns.

Put down a blanket in your house or garden and have a picnic for your lunch! Eat strawberries, oranges or kiwi if you have them! Watch this video all about Hanami; at 2:30 into the video practice pronouncing the Japanese words for ‘cherry blossom, full bloom, cherry blossom viewing, spring, pink, park, picnic, and flower. Try making this lantern too!

Activity 2:

Blossom has been nicknamed ‘Natures confetti’ – cut out paper petal shapes to throw into the air like confetti. See how many you can catch in a hat, bowl or net. Repeat until you’re a pro catcher!

You could also try making some blossom art work like this using objects found in your recycling.

Activity 3:

In the UK, on social media people are sharing pictures of the spring blossom they can see from their homes under the hashtag #BlossomWatch – take a look at what’s out there on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and see if you can spot any blossom next time you’re outside.

Daily Activity 13: Daffodils

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Spring & Easter

Fact of the day:

Daffodils announce the beginning of the Spring and the waking of nature.

Resources list:

Worthsworth’s poem; youtube; yellow household objects.

Activity 1:

Read Wordsworth’s poem about Daffodils here.  In the poem he describes that Daffodils move by ‘Fluttering and dancing in the breeze’, ‘Tossing their heads in sprightly dance’ and ‘They stretched in never-ending line’. Dance like a daffodil to this very yellow song while fluttering your arms, tossing your head, and stretching your limbs as far as you can.

Activity 2:

In your garden, or out on a walk, see if you can spot any Spring flowers, take a smell and see if the smell reminds you of anything.

Activity 3:

Try some Spring yoga moves such as Flower Pose, Tree Pose, or Butterfly Pose.  If these are tricky, try some Chair Yoga and when you stretch up your arms imagine you’re growing and blooming like a flower. Try stretching whilst enjoying this seasonal song.

Activity 4:

A field full of thousands of Daffodils looks so beautiful, like a huge blanket of yellow, see here. Find as many yellow items as you can in your house to make your own tabletop ‘daffodil field’.

Daily Activity 12: Spring Poems

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Spring & Easter

Fact of the day:

William Blake wrote ‘Songs of Innocence’ in 1789; several of the poems from this collection were written to welcome the Spring.

Resources list:

‘Spring’ poem; Youtube; bag with hidden textured household objects, blindfold; paper, art materials; ‘Ecchoing Green’ poem; metal cutlery.

Activity 1:

Read the poem ‘Spring’ by William Blake here or ask someone to read it out to you. Can you make some actions and sounds to go with the different lines?

The poem mentions ‘bird’s delight’, ‘nightingales’, ‘larks’ and a ‘cock crowing’. Open a window, or an outside door and quietly listen to the birds that you can hear. Count how many different birds you hear. Can you identify any of the birdsong, try watching this video.

Activity 2:

The poem mentions ‘Little Lamb Here I am’; practice calling out to let people know where you are – try Baaing and Bleating like the sheep heard here.

In the poem, the author can feel the soft wool of the sheep. Have somebody hide some textured objects in a bag for you; without looking (you can wear a blindfold) can you identify what the objects are just by feeling them – no peeking!

Activity 3:

Read the poem ‘Ecchoing Green’ by William Blake here or ask someone to read it out to you. Can you make some actions and sounds to go with the different words in bold?

The poem says ‘The sun does arise, And make happy the skies’; create your own ‘Sunrise’ artwork in the ‘pop art’ style of Roy Lichtenstein, using dots, bright colours, and cotton wool for clouds. Or, print out a version to colour in here.

Activity 4:

The poem says ‘The merry bells ring To welcome the Spring’; stretch up and pull down an imaginary bell rope in time with the bell ringing here, or, listen to ‘Ring My Bell’, have a dance and ding metal cutlery together in time with the song here.

Add-on Activity:

Both poems mention the birds of Spring; watch live video streams of birds feeding here, here, and here. Watch a live stream of goats, lambs and sheep here.

Join the Self Isolating Bird Club on Facebook or Twitter.

Daily Activity 11: Spring Animals

This week’s theme:

The Mysteries of Spring & Easter

This week’s colouring sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here. The spring flowers (clockwise from the top) are Narcissus, Anemone, Forget-Me-Not, Wild Garlic, Hyacinth and Iris.

Fact of the day:

There are about 5,000 different species of ladybirds in the world.

Resources list:

Internet; printer and red colouring in pens/pencils/paints; paper, pens, glue; pegs and crafty bits & pieces; youtube

Activity 1:

Play an online game to count and match Ladybird spots here

Activity 2:

Download and print a set of dominoes here. Colour them in to look like ladybirds before having a game!

Activity 3:

Make your own paper ladybirds or twirling ladybirds or peg insects. Peg or hang up the ladybirds up in your house or garden, what unusual places can you hide them in? Send us photos of where you find your sneaky insects! You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 4:

Try the ‘Little Lady Bug’ line dancing steps here or, come up with your own Ladybird inspired dance moves along with the country music.

Daily Activity 10: Orbiting

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places: Stars & Planets

Fact of the day:

An orbit is a repeating path that one object in space takes around another. The moon orbits the earth, and the earth orbits the sun.

Resources list:

Ball; round tray, tin, or bowl; youtube

Activity 1:

Try out this orbiting activity, getting a ball (could be a ball of tin toil, ball of paper) to ‘orbit’ around a dot drawn or stuck in a round bowl, tin or tray. Imagine the dot is the Sun and your ball is Earth, where we live.

Activity 2:

Listen to ‘You Spin me Round’ here. Try and ‘orbit’ something in your room by moving around it in a circle everytime you hear the word ‘spin’ – try not to get too dizzy!

Activity 3:

Venus spins in the opposite direction to all the other planets. Try walking backwards, saying your name backwards, or writing your name backwards. What does ‘elprup’ mean in the opposite direction? Have an ‘Opposite Day’ – say ‘yes’ when you mean ‘no’, wear your clothes back-to-front, eat your pudding first!

Daily Activity 9: Life on the Surface of a Planet

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places: Stars & The Planets

Fact of the day:

Some planets have rings, some have red spots, some are dusty, some have water and life.

Resources list:

Table, bits & bobs to create textures and height; Paper, pens, scissors; Youtube; Stop-motion app.

Activity 1:

Create a miniature planet display on a table; think about its colour and terrain – does it have mountains, lakes, water, ice, sand? Add anything you’d like to find on a new planet. Draw some creatures to cut out to live on your planet. Use things you can find in your home to create the different terrain and textures on your planet.

Activity 2:

Using your new planet as a set, make some cut out astronauts or aliens and create a music video for David Bowie’s ‘Space Oddity’  (or Ash ‘Girl From Mars’ or Beastie Boys ‘Intergalactic’, or Babylon Zoo ‘Spaceman’ etc). If you’re feeling techy, try filming your video as a stop-motion animation using free software such as this (for Android) or this (for Apple).

Activity 3:

Try walking slowly with big steps like an astronaut moon-walking in zero gravity.

Add-on Activity:

If you make a music video you can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Daily Activity 8: The Planets

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places: Stars & The Planets

Fact of the day:

There are 8 main planets in our solar system – Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus & Neptune.

Resources list:

Youtube; pen and paper.

Activity 1:

Listen to ‘The Planets Suite’ by Holtz; how does it make you feel, can you feel and hear what each planet might be like? Would you like to visit any of them after hearing this music?

Activity 2:

Listen to ‘How Many Planets’ by They Might be Giant How many of the planets they mentioned can you remember? Can you come up with your own way to remember the order of the planets (Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto) by making a snappy mnemonic; it could be ‘My Very Excellent Mother Just Served Us Nine Pizzas’ – share yours with us! You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Activity 3:

Try closing your eyes and relaxing or meditating to the sounds of the NASA Voyager recordings here.

Add-on Activity:

Look at the solar system on Google Sky here. Search NASA’s free collection of images, sounds and videos here to see planets up close.

Daily Activity 7: Ursa Major & Minor

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places: Stars & The Planets

Fact of the day:

The constellation Ursa Major is also known as the Great Bear, Ursa Minor is known as the Smaller Bear.

Resources list:

Paper/card, pens, scissors; You tube; Toilet roll tubes and pens/crayons/paint to decorate.

Activity 1:

Impersonate some bears – Growl like an angry Grizzly or Polar bear, say ‘Waka Waka’ like Fozzy Bear, and ‘Smarter Than The Average Bear’ like Yogi. Can you move like a hunting bear and catch a fish with your claws or jaws? Draw and design lots of your own colourful fish; cut them out and see how many can you catch if you throw them into the air.

Activity 2:

Listen to The Bear Necessities and have sing and dance along.

Activity 3:

Make some (great and small) toilet roll tube bears like these for a game of skittles.

Daily Activity 6: Constellations of Stars

This week’s theme:

Mysterious Places: Stars and The Planets

This week’s colouring sheet:

Download and print this week’s colouring sheet here

Fact of the day:

A constellation is a group of visible stars that form a pattern in the sky when viewed from Earth

Resources list:

Ladle or big spoon; pen; paper; crafty bits & bobs

Activity 1:

There are constellations called Orion (the hunter with a shining belt), Libra ‘the scales’, and The Ladle.

‘Orion: The Hunter’ – have somebody hide some objects in a room; can you hunt them down?

‘Libra: The Scales’ – Can you balance on one leg – how long can you do it for? Can you balance a book on your head and move around the room without dropping it – how far can you get before it falls?

‘The Ladle’ – Can you play a game of ‘This Is Not A Ladle’ with a ladle or big spoon as a prop. This is not a ladle, it’s a microphone! This is not a ladle it’s an oar to paddle my boat to India.

Activity 2:

The pattern that stars form may take the shape of an animal, a mythological creature, a person, or an object such as a microscope, a compass, or a crown. Draw some dots for ‘stars’ on a page, connect them together with pen lines – what animal/person/creature/object do you think the shape you’ve created looks like? What would you name your newly discovered constellation?

Activity 3:

This time use other objects; use cotton wool balls, raisins, popcorn, blue-tac,  smarties, marbles, beads, pompoms for stars, and connect them with shoe laces, ribbon, wool, string, straws. Why not take a photo of your constellation and share it with us? You can share it on our FacebookInstagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Add-on Activity:

When it gets dark, take a look out of the window and see how many night stars you can see. Look at the stars live from different planetariums from around the world here. Watch a film about stars that can be seen at this time of year here.

Daily Activities 5: A Super Poem!

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Heroes and Villains.

Fact of the day:

Many Superheroes have superpowers, from being able to travel through time, to having superhuman strength, to having supersenses.

Resources list:

Poem – here, paper, felt tips, household items

Activity 1:

Read the poem or ask someone to read it out to you. Can you make some actions and sounds to go with the different lines?

Activity 2:

Have a look for some household items to make the mountains or towers (cardboard boxes?), find some fabric to be the oceans and use water and food colouring to make your ‘cleaning up potions’!

Activity 3:

Make some colourful craft birds to ‘race through the sky’. Instructions here. Can you find something blue to put them on (towel/shirt/sheet) and take a picture like they are flying round? You could add some cotton wool clouds!

 

Daily Activities 4: Superman

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Heroes and Villains.

Fact of the day:

Superman is famous for his blue and red suit, which features the letter S on his chest.

Resources list:

Red and blue items of clothing; youtube; towel or sheets

Activity 1:

Do you have any red and/or blue clothes that you could wear, like Superman? link.

Activity 2:

Listen to ‘Superman’ by Black Lace here – can you do the actions along with the music?

Activity 3:

Make a cape using a towel or sheet. Can you pose to make it look like you’re flying?

Activity 4:

Make a symbol for your chest featuring your initial, like the one Superman has.

Add-on activity:

Send us a photo of you flying in your cape! You can share it on our Facebook, Instagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!

Daily Activities 3: The Joker

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Heroes and Villains.

Fact of the day:

The Joker is one of Batman’s oldest enemies, and is known for his iconic laugh.

Resources list:

Paper/card and pens, or a printer; Youtube

Activity 1:

Make some Joker masks with a big red smile and a shock of green hair. Printable version here

Activity 2:

Have a laughing contest – here. Can you laugh loudly and quietly? Can you laugh with a deep voice and high voice? Can you laugh in a funny or wacky way?

Activity 3:

Try some laughter yoga: here and here.  Or try some laughter yoga Bollywood dancing: here

Add-on Activity:

Do you know any jokes that might make your friends & family laugh. Let us know if you hear any good ones!

Daily Activities 2: Batman

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Heroes and Villains.

Fact of the day:

Batman is also known as the ‘Caped Crusader’, the ‘World’s Greatest Detective’, and the ‘Dark Knight’.

Resources list:

Towels/sheets; Paper/card and pens; Youtube

Activity 1:

Make some bat capes from towels or sheets and swoop around the room helping people. Does somebody need their coffee topping up? Does somebody need something from another room? Batman to the rescue!

Activity 2:

Pow! Kapow! Bof! Zwap! Whack! Thwack! Make some signs to hold up as you copy some of the acting from some classic 1960s comedy Batman duels – link (some sign ideas are here)

Activity 3:

The signs can also be seen during the credits to the show – link. Listen to the song and come up with an action or make a noise with your mouth or with an instrument everytime you hear the word ‘Batman’.

Add-on Activities:

  • Come up with some of your own signs for words and actions that you commonly hear in your house.
  • Batman has Robin and Batgirl as his sidekicks. Who in your house could be your sidekick? Can you work together all day to do nice things for each other and be helpful to everybody you live with?

Daily Activities 1: Superheroes

This week’s theme:

Mysterious People: Heroes and Villains.

Fact of the day:

Superheroes are dedicated to fighting the evil of their universe, protecting the public, and battling super-villains.

Resources list:

Paper, pens, decorative bits and bobs.

Activity 1:

What would your superhero name be? Write it down and decorate it with different colours and textures. There’s some ideas here

Activity 2:

What power poses would your superhero make? Why not try some of these poses?

Add-on Activity:

Why not take a photo of your decorated superhero name and share it with us? You can share it on our Facebook, Instagram or Twitter or send it to melanie@purplepatcharts.org and we’ll put it online for you!